LIT - LITERATURE

LIT-201 American Literature to 1880

This course is a study of representative American literature from its origins to the late nineteenth century. Students read selections from such areas as exploration narratives and Native American poetry, and from such authors as Bradstreet, Edwards, Douglass, Emerson, Hawthorne, Melville, Dickinson, and Whitman. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00]. 1

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

LIT-202 American Literature 1880 to Present

This course is a study of representative American literature from the late nineteenth century to the present. Students read works by such authors as Twain, O'Neill, Hurston, Hemingway, Faulkner, Frost, Wright, Ginsberg, and Rich. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

LIT-203 World Literature to 1650

This course is a study of world authors to the sixteenth century. Students read works such as Gilgamesh; selections from the Old and New Testaments, the Ramayana; and writings of such authors as Homer, Aeschylus, Li Po, Dante, Shakespeare, and Sor Juana. > General Education Course. >Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

LIT-204 World Literature 1650 to Present

This course is a study of world authors from the sixteenth century to the present. Students read works by such authors as Wu Ch'Eng-En, Racine, Goethe, Flaubert, Tolstoy, Eliot, Mahfouz, and Achebe. >General Education Course. >Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

LIT-205 English Literature to 1800

This course is a study of British literature from Anglo-Saxon times to the late eighteenth century. Students read works such as Beowulf and such authors as Chaucer, Kempe, Shakespeare, Milton, Dryden, Pope, and Swift. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

LIT-206 English Literature 1800 to Present

This course is a study of British literature from the Romantic period to the present. Students read works by such authors as Blake, Wordsworth, Austen, Hardy, Dickens, Yeats, Lawrence, Woolf, and Thomas. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

LIT-210 Introduction to the Short Story

This course is a study of short fiction: the stylistic and technical qualities of the genre, its kinship with narrative forms that stretch to the earliest literatures of diverse cultures, and the range of themes expressed in short stories, by authors writing in English and a variety of other languages. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

LIT-215 Black Literature in America

This course is a study of major African-American authors. The course provides a literary, historical, and sociological survey of the African-American experience. Students read works by such authors as Wheatley, Douglass, Ellison, Hurston, Baldwin, Malcolm X, Morrison, and Walker. >General Education Course. >Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

LIT-216 European Literature to 1650

This course is a study of European authors from Greco-Roman times to the Renaissance. Representative works are studied in their historical context. The course includes selections from such works as the Bible, ancient Greek tragedies and comedies, medieval epics and dramas, and such authors as Sappho, Plato, Virgil, Dante, Marie de France, Shakespeare, and Milton. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

LIT-218 American Ethnic Literature

This course examines the literature of America's ethnic groups. The course draws upon significant works of fiction, poetry, drama, and autobiography written by representatives of such groups as Native Americans, Hispanics, Irish, Jews, Asians, Blacks, and Italians. >General Education Course. >Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

LIT-220 Social Aspects of Literature

This course examines various concerns and issues that exist within human communities. The course allows students to explore social structures and the role of the individual within a larger social context, with the aim of developing a greater understanding of the interaction of self and society. Literary texts provide the foundation for discussion and analysis. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

LIT-221 Shakespeare

This course is an introduction to the works of William Shakespeare. Students will read several plays and sonnets. The variety of Shakespeare's themes, such as the nature of love, betrayal, leadership, and the power of art, will be examined. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

LIT-223 Contemporary Latin American Literature

In this course, students will read poetry, essays, short prose, and novels from several Latin American nations including Colombia, Peru, Cuba, Argentina, Mexico, Brazil, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, and Chile. We will also examine Latin American literature from various critical perspectives. >Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

LIT-226 Introduction to the Novel

This course is an introduction to the novel as a literary genre from its beginnings to the present. Authors to be studied may include, but are not limited to, Lady Murasaki, Cervantes, Richardson, Fielding, Voltaire, Austen, Melville, Dickens, Eliot, Flaubert, Dostoevsky, James, Joyce, Garcia Marquez, Achebe, Mahfouz, and Bolano. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

LIT-227 Introduction to Poetry

This course is a representative study of poetic forms and poetry from around the world. Through a close examination of the poetry, students will explore the evolution of poetic form, literary movements and a wide range of themes addressed through poetry. Topics for discussion and analysis will include historical, cultural, and social influences. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

LIT-228 Women in Literature

This course is a study of representative works by women writers in a variety of forms. The course provides a literary, historical, and sociological context for the study of this literature. Students read works by such authors as Julian of Norwich, Dickinson, Chopin, Woolf, Emecheta, Morrison, and Tan. >General Education Course. >Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

LIT-229 Myth and Literature

This course gives students an overview of the mythology of various selected cultures and shows the relation of mythology to our everyday lives. Works ranges from antiquity to the present. After taking this course, students will be able to analyze and understand mythic symbols in literature [poetry, short stories, or novels.] Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

LIT-230 Psychological Ideas in Literature

This is a course in which students read and study psychological ideas in literature. Themes such as exile, the unconscious, psychosis, and dreams will be addressed. Works range from antiquity to the present. The basic objective of the course is to raise provoking questions about psychological ideas in literature and to draw out the many ways in which psychology informs and offsets a literary perspective. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

LIT-231 Literature & Environmental Issues

This course traces the evolution of literary responses to our natural environment. Students will engage with a range of literary forms including (but not limited to) pastoral verse, Transcendentalist prose, Romantic lyric, post-industrial parody, postcolonial poetics, and climate fiction (or "cli-fi"). Students will likewise study corresponding critical methodologies, including, postcolonial criticism and ecocriticism, in addition to a range of global environmental histories. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101