PHY - PHYSICS

PHY-100 Energy and Society

This course provides an overview of the nature of energy, its uses, and its effect on the individual, society and the environment. The course explores the use of energy in contemporary society and the development of renewable energy technologies. Emphasis is placed on conservation, energy efficiency, renewable energy sources and technologies that can be utilized to create a sustainable energy society. The laboratory part of the course involves service learning projects. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

MAT-011

Corequisites

MAT-011

PHY-111 Astronomy

This course is a survey of the universe, light, astronomical instruments and the historical development of Astronomy. Topics to be studied are the heavens, which include the Earth as a planet, the Moon, the Solar System, stars, galaxies, quasars, black holes, and scientific theories of the creation of the universe. The possibility of life elsewhere is discussed throughout. Labs supplement the course material and include an evening at our observatory. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

PHY-112 Climatology

This course is a study of the Earth's climate. Climate elements and atmospheric heat transfer processes will be studied and applied to climate classification schemes. The effects of climate on human activities will be considered. Special attention will be given to the greenhouse effect, El Nino, Ice Age theories, climate explanations for the extinction of the dinosaurs, and past and future climates. Laboratory work features simple analytical and statistical analysis of climate data. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

PHY-113 Geology

This course is a study of the solid Earth. Topics include minerals and rocks, weathering and soils, groundwater, glaciers, deserts, earthquakes, and volcanism. Special attention will be given to mining and oil prospecting and their environmental effects, fossils and rocks, plate tectonics, analysis of the structure of the Earth's interior, and geologic time and Earth history. Laboratory work includes mineral and rock analysis, soil and vegetation studies, topographic mapping, and review of the geologic calendar. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

PHY-114 Meteorology

This course studies the physics of weather. All concepts are taught from their appropriate Physics principles. Our atmosphere's composition is studied along with those heat transfer mechanisms that lead to its thermal structure. Weather elements - temperature, humidity, clouds, pressure, winds, and precipitation - and their physical interactions are analyzed. The equations of motion are applied to the dynamics of hurricanes, cyclones, and anticyclones. Labs emphasize the Physics of sun-weather relationships, weather maps, and forecasting. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

PHY-185 Introduction to Physics

This course covers a series of topics selected from the following: Newton's Laws of Motion, mechanical energy, work and power, heat and heat transfer, electricity and magnetism, light, sound, atomic structure, and radioactivity and relativity. Conceptual principles are emphasized without dwelling on the rigorous mathematical aspects of the topics studied. Application of principles to environmental and health problems is included. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

PHY-186 General Physics I

This course is the first half of a two-semester, algebra-based physics sequence, and is a study of mechanics [motion, forces, and the conservation laws], waves, sound, and fluids. It covers kinematics, dynamics, energy, momentum, rotation, and the mechanical properties of matter. The laws of physics are investigated and applied to problem solving. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

MAT-160; minimum grade C

PHY-280 Physics I

This course is the first semester of a three-semester, calculus-based physics sequence, and is a study of mechanics [motion, forces, and the conservation laws]. It covers kinematics, dynamics, statics, energy, momentum, oscillations, gravity, and the properties of solid matter. The laws of physics are investigated and applied to problem solving. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

MAT-180; minimum grade C

Corequisites

MAT-280

PHY-286 General Physics II

This course is the continuation of PHY-186 General Physics I, and is a study of heat, electricity and magnetism, light, and modern physics. It covers thermodynamics, electrostatics, magnetic fields and forces, capacitance and inductance, electrical and electronic circuits, geometrical and physical optics, relativity, and quantum theory. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

PHY-186; minimum grade C

PHY-290 Physics II

This course is the continuation of PHY-280 Physics I, and is primarily a study of electricity and magnetism. It covers electrostatics, electrical circuits, magnetic fields and forces, capacitance and inductance, Maxwell?s equations, and the properties of fluids. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

MAT-280, PHY-280; minimum grade C

Corequisites

MAT-281

PHY-291 Physics III

This course is the continuation of PHY-290 Physics II, and is a study of waves, heat, and modern physics. It covers sound and light, geometrical and physical optics, thermodynamics, relativity, and quantum theory. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

MAT-281, PHY-290; minimum grade C

PHY-294 Engineering Mechanics: Statics

Engineering Mechanics - Statics is a study of the state of rest of bodies under the action of forces. This course builds a foundation of analytic capability for the solution of a great variety of engineering problems. Topics covered include the statics of particles and rigid bodies. Lecture [4.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

MAT-282, PHY-280; minimum grade C