PHR - PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION

PHR-100 Reasoning

This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of critical thinking. Topics covered may include the qualities and attitudes of the critical thinker; the nature and importance of rationality; the weighing of evidence and the rationality of belief; common errors in reasoning [e.g., fallacies]; the evaluation of concepts and definitions; the analysis and evaluation of arguments in ordinary language; argument diagramming; and reasoning about causes and probability. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

PHR-101 Introduction to Philosophy

This course is a study of the basic problems and methods of philosophical inquiry, concentrating on the work of such major thinkers as Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Descartes, Hume, Kant, Hegel, Marx, Kierkegaard, and Sartre. Topics of discussion include the nature and limits of human knowledge, the existence of God, the differences between right and wrong conduct, thenature of the good life, and the meaning and value of human existence. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

PHR-102 Contemporary Moral Issues

This course is an introduction to applied or practical ethics. This involves discussions of specific moral problems, issues, controversies, and questions. Topics may include abortion; euthanasia; the death penalty and other punishments; sexual morality; pornography and censorship; discrimination on the basis of race, gender, or sexual orientation; drugs; environmental ethics; the moral status of animals; and the meaning of virtue and vice. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

PHR-103 Introduction to Logic

This course is an introduction to the principles and methods of correct reasoning. Topics of discussion include the relationship between logic and language; the distinction between formal and informal logic; the detection and avoidance of formal and informal fallacies; the formulation and evaluation of deductive arguments; the differences between traditional and modern [symbolic] logic; and the nature, scope, and limits of inductive reasoning. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

PHR-106 Eastern Philosophy

This course is an introduction to the major philosophical traditions of China and India, concentrating on the work of such major thinkers as Lao Tzu, Confucius, Nagarjuna, Vasubandhu, Shankara, and Ramanuja. Topics of discussion include the nature, problems, and methods of Eastern philosophy; the nature of ultimate reality; the nature of the self; the nature and existence of God; the nature and limits of human knowledge; human nature and the human condition; the meaning and value of life and death; the nature of the good life; and the search for enlightenment. >General Education Course. >Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

PHR-107 Introduction to the Philosophy of Art

This course is a study of the basic problems, issues, and questions with respect to the understanding, interpretation, and evaluation of art and beauty. Readings may include philosophers such as Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Kant, Nietzsche, Beardsley, and representation in the arts; environmental aesthetics; the connections between art and ethics and politics; and the nature of aesthetic value. >General Education Course. Lecture: [3.00].

Credits

3

PHR-110 Introduction to Ethics

This course is a study of the basic theories, methods, and problems of moral philosophy. Topics may include the study of the moral theories of Aristotle, Aquinas, Hobbes, Kant, Mill, and Rawls; the relationship of ethics and morality to religious belief; morality and evolution; the nature and meaning of moral terms; moral absolutism and relativism; egoism and altruism; the nature of moral reasoning; conceptions of the good life; free will and moral responsibility. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

PHR-111 Social and Political Philosophy

This course is a general introduction to the broad themes of political philosophy and social theory. Discussions will include: how human life is and should be organized into societies; the nature of political systems and different forms of government; the relationship between the individual and the state; the nature of justice; the influence of economy on society; how human nature influences social nature; and the meaning of freedom and democracy. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

PHR-120 Introduction to Religion

This course is a study of major themes in religious and theological thought. Topics of discussion include the nature and existence of God; the relationship between God, humanity, and the universe; human nature and the human condition; religious responses to the problems of human existence; and the relationship between religion and society. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

PHR-121 Religions of the World

This course is a comparative study of the history, basic beliefs, and characteristic practices of such major religious systems as Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Some attention is also given to the religions of ancient Middle Eastern and Mediterranean peoples, to ancient and modern tribal religions, and to contemporary sectarian and cultic movements. >General Education Course. >Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

PHR-122 Women and Religion

This course analyzes the relationship of women to the major religious traditions of the world, including Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and others. The course examines such issues as religious statements about the nature of women, religious codes of behavior for women, and the extent and nature of women's religious participation within the various traditions.>Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

PHR-124 The Christian Scriptures

This course is an introductory study of traditional and modern perspectives on the Old and New Testaments, with primary emphasis on the New Testament. >Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

PHR-125 The Hebrew Scriptures

This course is an introductory study of traditional and modern perspectives on the Hebrew Bible. The relationship between the Bible and the Talmud will also be discussed. >Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

PHR-126 The Islamic Scriptures

This course is an introductory study of the origins, content, and meaning of the primary sacred text of Islam, the Koran [Qur'an]. The relationship between the Koran and the Hadith [a record of sayings and actions of Muhammed] will also be discussed. >Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

PHR-127 The Buddhist Scriptures

This course is an introductory study of the origins, content, and meaning of the primary texts of Buddhism. In addition to its origins in India and the development of the Theravada and Mahayana schools, the course will also examine the development of Buddhism in Tibet and East Asia, including Pure Land and Zen Buddhism, and in the contemporary West. >Diversity Course. Lecture[3.00].

Credits

3