Courses

ACC-100 Introduction to Accounting

This course explores the need and use of accounting information in the business world, as well as provides an overview of accounting careers. The course is designed to give students a user's perspective of accounting and also to provide them with the necessary communication and analytical skills needed to succeed in future accounting courses. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2. 00].

Credits

3

ACC-107 Federal Taxation

This course reviews the history and background of federal taxation. Students learn the tax definitions of gross income, deductions, and gains and losses, and they examine accounting methods approved by the IRS. The preparation of federal income tax returns is also covered. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

ACC-110 Financial Accounting

This course is an introduction to the theory of accounting and the procedures necessary to produce financial statements. This course focuses on the classification, valuation and communication of financial information. An emphasis will be placed on the usefulness of financial accounting concepts. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

ACC-115 Government and Not-for-Profit Accounting

This course provides the student with the foundations of accounting for governmental and not-for-profit organizations. It introduces students to accounting standards and those applications germane to governmental and not-for- profit entities. Emphasis is placed on fund accounting, budgeting, financial reporting, and accounting procedures. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

ACC-120 Computerized Accounting

This course provides the student with the skills necessary to use popular computerized accounting packages such as QuickBooks or Peachtree for Windows. The student will obtain a theoretical accounting background. The student, using basic accounting concepts, will prepare and analyze various accounting documents, reports and statements. It is recommended that this course be takenconcurrently with ACC-110 Financial Accounting. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

ACC-202 Intermediate Accounting I

This course is an in-depth study of accounting principles and their application to the preparation of financial statements. Students participate in a detailed study of current assets and current liabilities. The analysis and preparation of cash flow statement is also taught. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ACC-210; minimum grade C

ACC-203 Intermediate Accounting II

This course is an in-depth study of accounting principles as they relate to non-current assets, long-term liabilities, paid-in capital, retained earnings, accounting changes, and error analysis. Earnings per share and financial statement analysis are also covered in this course. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ACC-202

ACC-206 Hospitality Accounting

This course is an introduction to basic accounting principles and procedures, which includes the preparation of financial statements, specifically designed for the hospitality industry. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HRM-101

ACC-210 Managerial Accounting

This course explores accounting information as a tool used in decision making by management. Emphasis will be placed on cost behaviors as they relate to the planning, control and evaluation of a business entity. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ACC-110

ACC-215 Topics in Accounting

This course is a study of current issues in the accounting profession and specialized areas of accounting. Topics will be varied and based upon an examination of recent cases and issues. Coverage will include new developments in accounting theory and practice and the pronouncements of various accounting bodies. The student will examine individual topics in greater depth than possible in traditional accounting courses. This course is not intended for students enrolled in an A.S. transfer program. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ACC-202

ACC-292 Co-Op Work Experience [Accounting]

This course requires part-time student employment in a business organization in order to permit the student to gain knowledge of accounting practices. Co-Op job placement assistance is available through the Co-Op Office. 1 lecture, 2 credits; plus 179 minimum hours work experience distributed over the semester. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [12.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

ACC-210

ACC-293 Co-Op Work Experience [Accounting] [3.00 cr.]

This course provides the student with practical, supervised experience in accounting. Through on-the-job experience, students acquire some of the practical expertise and knowledge needed to pursue a career in these fields. Students are supervised by a faculty member and job placement assistance is available through the Co-Op Office. 1 lecture, 3 credits; plus 225 minimum hourswork experience distributed over the semester. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [12.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ACC-210

ALP-004 American Language Foundations Grammar A

This course is a course for international students with little or no exposure to English. It introduces students to the most basic grammar of English with emphasis on the simplest tenses, structures, and forms. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

ALP-005 American Language Foundations Grammar B

This course provides students with continued work on the most basic structures of English. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

ALP-006 American Language Foundations Reading

This course is a course for international students with little or no exposure to English. It provides them with instruction in pronouncing written words and understanding simple written texts. It also introduces students to the most common vocabulary of English and develops their ability to use this vocabulary in basic structures. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

ALP-007 American Language Foundations Writing

This course is a course for international students with little or no exposure to English. It provides students with instruction in the spelling of English and in writing simple sentences using the structures and vocabulary learned in American Language Foundations: Grammar and Reading. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

ALP-041 American Language I: Grammar A

This course introduces students to the basic grammar of the English simple sentence, with emphasis on verb tenses. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ALP-004, ALP-005

ALP-042 American Language I: Grammar B

This course provides students with continued work on the basic grammar of the English simple sentence, with emphasis on nouns, adjectives, and adverbs. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ALP-004, ALP-005

ALP-043 American Language I: Writing

This course provides students with carefully guided exercises in the writing of English sentences and paragraphs. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ALP-004, ALP-005, ALP-007

ALP-044 American Language I: Reading

This course helps students with their vocabulary development and gives them practice in reading for comprehension with material up to the 1,000 word vocabulary level. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ALP-004, ALP-005, ALP-006

ALP-051 American Language II: Grammar A

This course continues the study of the English simple sentence begun in American Language I and introduces the compound sentence. The emphasis is on infinitives, modal verbs, and adverbs and students are introduced to dependent clauses. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ALP-006, ALP-007, ALP-041, ALP-042

ALP-052 American Language II: Grammar B

This course gives students work on perfect tenses and compound sentences, provides an introduction to the passive voice and to participial forms, and continues the study of dependent clauses. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ALP-006, ALP-007, ALP-041, ALP-042

ALP-053 American Language II: Writing

This course gives students work on both guided and free writing exercises at the paragraph level. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ALP-041, ALP-042, ALP-043

ALP-054 American Language II: Reading

This course emphasizes reading for content and helps students develop their inferential skills on reading material up to the 3,000 word vocabulary level. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ALP-041, ALP-042, ALP-044

ALP-055 Direct Studies American Language II

This course is for students in the American Language Program who need intensive, supplemental instruction in grammar and writing skills. This computer-assisted learning program is provided on an individual, prescriptive basis. Lecture [1.00].

Credits

1

ALP-061 American Language III: Grammar A

This course completes the study of the passive voice, of modal verbs, and compound sentences and begins a complete survey of dependent clauses in the English sentence. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ALP-043, ALP-044, ALP-051, ALP-052

ALP-062 American Language III: Grammar B

This course completes the study of all the phrasal and clausal structures normally used in English sentences. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ALP-043, ALP-044, ALP-051, ALP-052

ALP-063 American Language III: Writing

This course provides students with intensive practice in the writing of paragraphs and provides a transition to college-level writing with an introduction to the essay. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ALP-051, ALP-052, ALP-053

ALP-064 American Language III: Reading

This course emphasizes reading for content, making inferences, distinguishing main and subordinate points, and evaluating the ideas and presentation of reading material at and beyond the 4,000 word vocabulary level. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ALP-051, ALP-052, ALP-054

ALP-065 Direct Studies American Language III

This course is for students in the American Language Program who need intensive, supplemental instruction in grammar and writing skills. This computer-assisted learning program is provided on an individual, prescriptive basis. Lecture [1.00].

Credits

1

ALP-068 Advanced Academic English Skills

This course develops and enhances the ability of students to read, wirte, speak and listen to the academic English that is needed for college success. Students will be taught to apply techniques and strategies so that they can use academic discourse more effectively. Students will read and discuss materials from a wide=range of academic disciplines, increase listening comprehension for academic lectures, practice expressing themselves orally on a variety of academic topics and continue to build their fluency and accuracy in their use of written English. This course will also benefit students who plan to apply to colleges or universities that require the TOEFL, IELTS or any other standardized test of English. Lecture [3.00]

Credits

3

ANT-100 Introduction to Anthropology

This course offers a comprehensive approach to the study of cultural diversity. The course introduces students to the four fields of anthropology: socio/cultural anthropology, archaeology, linguistics, and physical/biological anthropology. Introduction to Anthropology emphasizes behaviors, similarities and differences in adaptations, and variations in current and past human populations. >General Education Course. >Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

ANT-101 Cultural Anthropology

This course is a comparative study of human cultures. Attention is given to the various ways in which people cope with their natural settings and their social environments and to the ways in which customs are learned and handed down from one generation to the next. Topics of discussion include the family, social change, religion and magic, economic and political systems, the arts, and urban anthropology. >General Education Course. >Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

ANT-102 Introduction to Archaeology

This course will study past human cultures and societies as evidenced by material remains. This course provides information on the basic theories, methods, and techniques used in archaeology. Important topics include archaeological survey and excavation, artifact analysis, dating techniques, conservation and display of artifacts, dietary reconstruction, the analysis of prehistoric social and political organization, and the evolution of cities and ancient civilizations. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

ART-101 Introduction to Art and Visual Culture

This course trains students in the analysis of images and aesthetic objects and considers issues regarding art production, viewer response, and art in society. A spectrum of fine art, decorative arts, and commercial design from diverse cultures is presented in a non-chronological format through illustrated lectures, discussions, and independent visits to exhibitions. Techniquesof visual and thematic analysis are applied to exemplary works from world cultural history and contemporary life. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

ART-102 History of Art and Visual Culture to 1400

This course is a chronological survey of art and visual culture, western and non-western, from the Mesopotamian period through the Middle Ages. In a lecture and discussion format, selected works of sculpture, architecture, and painting, as well as decorative utilitarian objects made by peoples in Europe, the Middle East, India, Asia, and Africa are studied both for their stylesand materials and their relation to politics, religion and patronage. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

ART-103 History of Art and Visual Culture 1400-1900

This course is a chronological survey of art and visual culture, western, and non-western. Selected works of painting, sculpture, architecture, drawing, printmaking, and decorative utilitarian objects made by peoples in Europe [Renaissance to Post-Impressionism], Asia, North and South America, India and Africa are studied both for their styles, materials, and techniques and their relation to history, society, religion, patronage, politics and modernity. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

ART-104 Modern Art 1890-1940

This course is a chronological survey of selected works of European and American painting, sculpture and architecture. These demonstrate both individual artists? innovative thinking and visual art?s prominent role in the formation of culture, society, and the idea of modernity in relation to historical art, urbanism, spiritualism and war. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

ART-105 History of Animation

This course focuses on the history and development of animation as an art form, with particular attention to works of significant innovation and expression. Topics include: the earliest cinematic practices; the first animated films, 1898-1928; sociological trends such as censorship and blacklisting of American animators; Japanese animation; the commerce of animation, including discussion of the studio system; involvement of the avant-garde with animation; animation from Europe; and the development of computer animation techniques. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

ART-106 History of Graphic Design

This course covers the history of communication from its origins through the industrial revolution, the invention of the printing press, major European and Asian movements, contemporary graphic design, and advertising. Computer and Internet - driven influences are addressed. This course acquaints students who are considering the graphic design field as to the depth, influence, and impact of graphic design on culture and vice versa. Lecture [3.00]

Credits

3

ART-107 History of Photography

This course is a chronological survey of the aesthetic, historical and technical development of still photography as a major medium of artistic expression from its invention in the early 19th century to its present prominence in contemporary art. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

ART-110 Contemporary Art 1940-Present

This course is a chronological survey of the expansion of forms, media, issues, and participants in the art made in industrial nations since World War II. Selected works of painting, sculpture, photography, architecture, performance, and video are examined as stylistic and historical objects addressing art history and theory, popular culture, politics, gender, race, and a trulyglobal culture. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

ART-122 Two-Dimensional Design

This course is an introduction to the studio skills, concepts, and language applicable to the problems of two-dimensional design as related to the visual arts. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

ART-123 Life Drawing I

This course is an intensive study of the anatomy and structure of the human figure as rendered in pencil, brush, charcoal, and ink. Emphasis is placed upon line perspective, form, value, and space relationships. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

ART-124 Drawing Fundamentals

This course teaches free and schematic drawing skills necessary for advanced studio applications in the visual arts. Lecture [2. 00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

ART-125 Illustration

This course is designed to develop skills in illustration based in drawing, painting, and digital media in order to create visual interpretations of a text or idea. Different media, styles, and creative solutions are explored along with strategies for visual problem solving. Examples of projects are editorial illustration, comics, and illustrations for objects and clothing. Lectures 2.00], Laboratory [2.00]

Credits

3

ART-126 Introduction Computer Graphic

This course is a class in the use of the computer as a visual tool. Emphasis is placed on creative visual output. No knowledge of mathematics or programming is required. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

ART-127 Painting I

This course is an introduction to the techniques and aesthetic considerations of painting. The thread of study is two-fold: a. traditional oil painting: formal, academic study of structure, spatial relationships, value, composition, color, temperature, and texture; b. contemporary: unique, creative expression in oil and/or other media in pursuit of contemporary approaches grounded in sound design and concept. In both threads, student painting may include portraiture/life model, still life, interiors/exteriors, landscapes, and/or non-objective. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

ART-128 Watercolor

This course is an introduction to the techniques and aesthetic considerations of watercolor media. This course addresses a formal, academic study of structure, spatial relationships,value, composition, color, temperature, and texture as well as contemporary approaches unique to watercolor. Subjects might include portraiture/life model, still life, interiors, landscapes, and abstract and nonobjective subject matter. Outside assignments required. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00]

Credits

3

ART-129 Collage: Materials and Techniques

This studio course takes a hands-on approach to exploring the techniques, materials, and history of collage through in-class exercises and lectures. Students will examine the role of collage in a variety of art movements, including Cubism, Surrealism, and Pop Art. Students will explore the profound impact of collage on modern and contemporary design culture. Lecture [3.00]

Credits

3

ART-160 Sound for Visual Media

Sound for Visual Media ia a hands-on course exploring the ways dialogue, sound effects and music intertwine with various forms of visual media including film, video, and multimedia content. Topics include diegetic vs. non-diegetic sound, Foley, location sound, automated dialogue replacement, voiceover recording, recording techniques, mixing, and signal processing. Students will study how sound has been used historically in visual media, as well as create their own soundscapes. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00]

Credits

3

Cross Listed Courses

COM-160, MUS-160

ART-181 Photography I

This course introduces camera handling and basic black and white darkroom techniques. Topics covered include camera operations, principles of exposures, basic understanding of light, film development, printing, picture content and compositional design. Technical and aesthetic possibilities of photography are explored through hands-on visual shooting assignments, photo exhibitions, slide presentations and critiques. A 35mm SLR camera with manual override is required. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

ART-184 Digital Photography

This course is designed for students with a basic understanding of computer graphics to gain knowledge of digital photography and photographic manipulation. Students will create art using a variety of photographic processes. Through hands-on assignments, slide presentations, critiques, readings, and exhibitions, students will engage with and build upon the artistic and technicalpossibilities created by extending photography into the digital realm. Scanners, printers, and computers will be available for classroom use. Digital SLR camera required for the course. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

ART-189 Computer 2D Illustration

This course explores the essential techniques for creating two-dimensional illustrations, logos and charts using the drawing tools and functions. This course emphasizes the basic operations and functions of object-oriented computer graphics using both spot and process color on the computer. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

ART-192 Computer 3D Animation I

This course concentrates on the use of state-of the-art 3D animation software. Students become familiar with animation in a 3D environment using proper lighting, camera setup, and design and rendering capabilities. Recording peripherals are also introduced. Class discussion and direct application of techniques focus on the use of desktop animation workstations in today's workingenvironment. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

ART-197 Computer Imaging

This course teaches the basic principles of digital image processing and manipulation, including scanning, editing, color correction, color separations, special effects and transformation techniques. This course emphasizes the methods used to scan images from photographs, to retouch and alter these images, and to create bit-mapped illustrations. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

ART-220 Computer Layout

This course is designed for students knowledgeable in typography wishing to expand their skills in a hands - on creative manner. Students design and set type for advertising, publishing and corporate business problems. This course familiarizes students with the basics of layout and design including various implications of two - dimensional designs in print layout software such as In Design is used to develop basic skills in creating layout and design on Macintosh computers. Lectures,[2.00], Laboratory [2.00 ]

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART-226

ART-223 Life Drawing II

This course further advances the study of the human figure by refining the studio skills and ideas explored in Life Drawing I.Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART-123

ART-226 Letterform and Type

This course is the study of typographic design, history, and function, and appropriate usage. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART-122

ART-228 Painting II

This course continues the studio practice introduced in ART-127 in which students explore and develop technical and aesthetic considerations in painting. The thread of study is two-fold: a. traditional, academic study in oil painting; and b. contemporary painting experimentation and exploration in oil and/or other media. As in ART-127, student painting may include portraiture/life model, still life, interiors/exteriors, landscapes, and/or non-objective work. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART-127

ART-229 Painting III

This course continues the studio experience introduced in ART-127 and further explored in ART-228. Students develop more advanced technical competencies, and more refined personal, aesthetic considerations, than in the previous two courses. The thread of study is two-fold: a. traditional, academic study in oil painting; and b. contemporary painting experimentation and exploration in oil and/or other media. Student painting may include portraiture/life model, still life, interiors/exteriors, landscapes, and/or non-objective work. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART-228

ART-230 Painting IV

This course furthers the studio experience of the previous courses. The thread of study is two-fold: a. traditional, academic study in oil painting; and b. contemporary experimentation and exploration in oil and/or other media. In this advanced course, students work toward greater technical competency than achieved in ART-229, and an increasingly refined personal aesthetic thatincludes both their work and a written statement. Painting may include portraiture/life model, still life, interiors/exteriors, landscapes, and/or non-objective work. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART-229

ART-259 Computer Graphics Web Developer

This course is an introduction to select software packages that increase a Web developer's ability to refine electronic images and text. Areas covered include aesthetic application; creating graphics in JPEG and GIF formats; using fonts; working with animations and video for the Web utilizing GIF, QuickTime and Flash animations; and troubleshooting technical problems. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART-189 or ART-197

ART-260 Graphic Design I

This course enables students to develop proficiency in the graphic communication processes. Emphasis is on creative design solutions for commercial art problems. Students apply their knowledge in preparing graphics for publication and sales promotion. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART-226

ART-261 Graphic Design II

This course is a continuation of the problem solving approach to design previously explored in Graphic Design I. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART-260, ART-287

ART-271 Portfolio Presentation

This course is a class in the selection, arrangement, and presentation of visual communication material. From designing a how to get your foot in the door resume/cover letter to a how-to in visual arts business practices., this class is a must for freelancers and transfer/graduate aspirants alike. Topics covered include: current portfolio and presentation types, interview techniques, writing resume and cover letters, how artwork is priced, business and legal practices for commissioned artwork, employment issues, salaries and freelance prices. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

ART-122, ART-189, ART-197, and any 3 courses from the following: ART-127, ART-260, ART-226, ART-192, ART-287, ART-290, ART-298, MUS-151

ART-272 Co-Op Work Experience [Visual Art]

This course places students as assistants in commercial art establishments. Students must work a minimum number of hours for the semester and will also attend a weekly one-hour seminar at Bergen. Student's work experiences are supervised by Bergen faculty members. Co-Op job-placement assistance is available through the Co-Op Office. 1 lecture, plus 120 minimum hours work experience distributed over the semester. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [8.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

ART-260

ART-273 Co-Op Work Experience [Visual Art]

This course places students as assistants in commercial art establishments. Students must work a minimum number of hours for the semester and will also attend a weekly one-hour seminar at Bergen. Student's work experiences are supervised by Bergen faculty members. Co-Op job-placement assistance is available through the Co-Op Office. 1 lecture, plus 180 minimum hours work experience distributed over the semester. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [12.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART-260

ART-281 Photography II

This course refines and further explores techniques and ideas presented in Photography I. Emphasis is on the relationship between exposure, film development and the finished print. Course work focuses on enhanced darkroom skills and experimentation with toners, different photographic papers, advanced lighting situations, and exposure techniques. A 35mm SLR camera with manual override is required. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART-181

ART-287 Computer Layout I

This course is designed for students knowledgeable in typography wishing to expand their skills in a hands-on creative manner. Students design and set type for advertising, publishing and corporate business problems. Lecture [2.00] Laboratory [2.00]

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART-226 and ART-189 or ART-197

ART-290 Computer 2D Animation I

This course introduces the fundamental skills and concepts of 2D computer animation, motion graphics, and digital video. The focus is twofold: technical and aesthetic. Technical study is comprehensive, from operating systems and software interface, to audio/video capture, to special effects, editing, and output. Aesthetic issues emphasize innovative approaches to sequential organization of thematic materials. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART-189 or ART-197

ART-291 Computer 2D Animation II

This course is an advanced level studio experience in computer animation design and production. Technical and aesthetic issues in masking, keyframing, interlacing, and compression are explored. Students learn to incorporate illustrations, photographs, video, and audio into their animations, as works progress from storyboard to completion. For students familiar with 3D animationtechniques explored in ART-292 and/or ART-293, the possibilities for incorporating 3D animations into their projects are presented. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART-290

ART-293 Computer 3D Animation II

This course continues the study of state-of-the-art 3D animation, while concentrating on advanced technique and the integration of other computer graphic hardware/software in producing student work. Course work emphasizes the development of realistic and/or stylized visuals, as well as eye-catching special effects. Demo reels and business practices are included in the class workand discussion. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART-192

ART-298 Interactive Multimedia

This course teaches the principles of building illustrations and photographs into time-based computer visuals with sound. Students will create, assemble, and animate interactive media for distribution on CD-ROM and the Web. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART-189 or ART-197

AVT-100 Introduction to Aeronautics

This course is a study of the science, theory, and practice of designing, building, and operating aircraft. Topics considered include a brief history of the evolution of aviation and aircraft, basic aircraft design and flight controls, aircraft systems, navigation, air law, airport operations, and weather. Aeronautical decision-making, concept application, and practical applications will be stressed. Credits [4]. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

AVT-115 Aviation Meteorology

This course is a study of current aviation weather concepts and modeling as applied to the aviation industry. Topics considered include a brief history of the evolution of weather theory, the impact of computer modeling systems, and advances in weather data collection. Weather Systems concept application and practical Aviation Weather as used in an operational environment will be stressed. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

AVT-210 Introduction to Aircraft Avionics I

This course is the first in a two course sequence. It is a study of the electronics and computer technologies that have revolutionized the aircraft industry. Topics considered include; avionics bus systems used for fly-by-wire intra-aircraft communications, types of digital communications signals used, basic digital logic, various valid input and output levels, and digital states. Avionics system architectures, concept applications, and practical aircraft usage will be stressed. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00]

Credits

4

AVT-240 Introduction to Aviation Safety

This course is a study of the developments in Human Factors, Accident Investigations and Risk Management as applied to the aviation industry. The impact of automation systems and practical Aircraft Accident Investigation will be studied. Familiarity with aviation safety regulations and best practices will be stressed. Students will gain factual and conceptual knowledge which will help them conduct current and future aviation operation in a professional and safe manner. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

AVT-100

BIO-101 General Biology I

This is the first course in a two-semester sequence in general biology. It is designed to explain the fundamental principles of biology and to promote an awareness of their significance to society. Lecture topics include: Introduction to biology, review of basic chemistry, cell biology, genetics, and a survey of Kingdoms Monera, Protista, and Fungi. Laboratory exercises developproficiency in the use of laboratory equipment and guide students in investigations of cell biology, genetics, and microbiology. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

BIO-103 The Human Body

This is a one-semester course that is concerned with basic chemistry, the human cell, tissues, and the musculoskeletal, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. The course includes a survey of metabolism and fluid/electrolyte balance. Lectures are supplemented by writing assignments and discussions. Laboratory exercises include microscopy, dissection, and anatomical and physiological experiments that complement the lecture. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

BIO-104 Microbiology

This is a laboratory science course that emphasizes the principles of biology as they apply to microorganisms. The morphology, anatomy, physiology, growth, metabolism, nutrition, control, and identification of the various microbes, genetics including recombination technology, industrial and clinical case studies in microbiology are discussed. Representative laboratory exercisesinclude staining procedures, media preparation, pure culture techniques, culture identification, and serology. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

BIO-107 Introduction to Human Biology

This course is a human anatomy and physiology course intended for the non-biology major. Biological principles are taught by examining human body systems, homeostasis, and disease. This information, relevant because it applies to their own bodies, will help students understand medical issues, appreciate the importance of exercise and nutrition in maintaining health, and consider environmental concerns including the health effects of pollution and overpopulation. Laboratory exercises include experimentation, microscopy, and dissection. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

BIO-108 Introduction to Environmental Biology

This deals with humans and their interactions with the environment. Topics covered include fundamental aquatic and terrestrial ecology, air and water pollution, world population problems, loss of biodiversity, pesticides, solid waste problems and an extensive review of energy problems and their solutions. Laboratories include measurements of various environmental pollutants, analysis of environmental parameters and descriptive and practical reinforcement of lecture material. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

BIO-109 Anatomy and Physiology I

This course is an introduction to the basic principles of human anatomy and physiology that emphasizes some common diseases in relation to the various body systems. Among the topics considered is the basic plan of the body, tissues, the skeletal system, the muscular system, articulations, cardiovascular system, and the respiratory system. Lectures are supplemented by writing assignments, discussion, and laboratory sessions that include dissection and elementary physiology experiments. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

BIO-119 Intense Wolf Study

This course deals with an organism that represents the conflicts between humans and wildlife management issues. Taught at the International Wolf Center in Ely, Minnesota, during the winter semester break, students will study captive wolves as well as wolves in their natural habitat. Lecture topics include the biology and ecology of the gray wolf, Canis lupus. Afternoon and evening sessions involve field work and independent study. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [6.00].

Credits

3

BIO-130 People-Plant Relationships

This course explores the effects of plants on biological organisms that influence human economic, social and psychological behavior. The course will focus on two major themes: 1] plants as sources of food, shelter, clothing, drugs, and industrial raw material; and 2] the influence of plant life on human cultural diversity, biotechnology, medicine, and conservation efforts. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

BIO-131 General Botany

This course is an introduction to the biology of plants. The course includes an analysis of plant structure and function, an explanation of the principles of plant genetics, an exploration of plant evolution, and an examination of plant ecology. The importance of plants to people will be illustrated through discussions of people's ecological and economic dependence upon plants.The course content will be presented through lectures, demonstrations, and laboratory exercises. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

BIO-203 General Biology II

This course explores the evolution and biodiversity of representative organisms in the plant and animal kingdoms. Studies of plants investigate diversity, structure, and the physiology of absorption, transport, and photosynthesis. Students will examine the structure and life cycles of invertebrate and vertebrate animals. In a unit on Ecology, students will learn how living organisms interact with their environment. Laboratory exercises utilizing observation, experimentation, microscopy, and dissections provide practical demonstrations of the topics covered in lecture. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

BIO-101

BIO-209 Anatomy and Physiology II

This course continues the study of human anatomy and physiology. Among the topics considered are the digestive system, metabolism, urinary system, fluid and electrolyte balance, the nervous system, the endocrine system, and the reproductive system. Lectures are supplemented by writing assignments, discussion and laboratory sessions that include dissection and elementary physiology experiments. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

BIO-109; minimum grade C

BIO-210 Introduction to Biotechnology

This course is designed to give students both a theoretical background and a working knowledge of the instrumentation and techniques employed in a biotechnology laboratory. Emphasis will be placed on the introduction of foreign DNA into bacterial cells, as well as the analysis of nucleic acids [DNA and RNA] and proteins. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00]. 1

Credits

4

Prerequisites

BIO-101

BIO-211 Introduction to Bioinformatics

This course is designed to give students both a theoretical background and a working knowledge of the techniques employed in bioinformatics. Emphasis will be placed on biological sequence [DNA, RNA, protein] analysis and its applications. Lecture [2. 00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BIO-101, BIO-210

BIO-217 Sustainability in Nature

Our Earth's systems, natural and human, are experiencing sudden and dramatic changes that challenge their sustainability. The principles and practices of sustainability need to be interdisciplinary so that current needs are met without compromising the needs of future generations. This course provides a fundamental knowledge of these topics and the balance of the multiple interactions. Discussions will include responsible environmental stewardship through the actions of individuals and of private &public sectors. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00] . General Education Course:

Credits

4

Prerequisites

BIO 108; BIO 130; or, BIO 131

BIO-221 Comparative Anatomy

This course is a study of the body structures of some representative vertebrate animals and of their functional and evolutionary relationships. Laboratory exercises include detailed dissection of the Lamprey eel, the dogfish shark, the mud puppy, the cat and other animals. Lecture [3.00]; laboratory [3.00] 3

Credits

4

Prerequisites

BIO-101, BIO-203

BIO-222 Embryology

This course is the study of vertebrate embryonic development from gametogenesis and fertilization to the development of the body organs. Laboratory exercises include experiments with living sea urchins, Japanese madeka fish, frogs, and chick embryos, as well as microscopic examination of the various sections of the embryos. Lecture [3.00]; Laboratory [3.00]3

Credits

4

Prerequisites

BIO-101; BIO-203

BIO-224 Environmental Microbiology

This is a course concerning bacteria and other microorganisms and their role in the environment. Topics will include an introduction to the main groups of microorganisms and their physiology, soil microbiology, cycles of elements, aquatic microbiology, sewage treatment, bioremediation, and applied microbiology encompassing food microbiology, industrial microbiology, and biotechnology. Lecture [3.00]; Laboratory [3.00] 3

Credits

4

Prerequisites

BIO 101; BIO 203

BIO-225 Invertebrate Zoology

This is a survey of the organisms without backbones, the invertebrates. Topics include the taxonomic concepts of cladistics versus the Linnaean phylogenetic study of these organisms. Concepts such as prostomates vs. deuterostomates, the development of the coelom, metamorphosis, etc., will be discussed. Laboratory sessions include external and internal examinations [dissections]of these organisms and descriptive and practical reinforcement of lecture materials. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

BIO-101, BIO-203

BIO-227 Principles of Ecology

This course deals with terrestrial and aquatic ecology. Topics covered include abiotic characteristics of ecosystems as well as detailed discussions of populations, communities, ecosystems and biomes. Discussions also include such topics as ecological succession and paleoecology. Qualitative and quantitative data of ecosystems is gathered during the early part of the semester inwhich ecological data will be collected during field experiences. These data will be analyzed during the second half of the semester in the laboratory. Statistical analysis and report writing will also be stressed. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

BIO-101, BIO-203

BIO-228 Introduction to Marine Biology

This course deals with a basic introduction to marine environments, emphasizing ecological principles governing marine life throughout the world. Topics include basic oceanography, marine ecological systems, planktonic communities, deep-sea biology, subtidal and intertidal ecology, estuarine and coral reef communities, human impact, mariculture and pollution. Lab sessions will include in-house lab exercises, field experiences, analysis of data, group projects and report writing. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

BIO-101, BIO-203

BIO-229 Tropical Marine Ecology

This course covers characteristics of populations, communities, and ecosystems found in tropical regions. Taught at the Keys Marine Laboratory in Long Key, Florida, during the summer semester, students study coral reef structure and ecology, the intertidal zone, mangrove and terrestrial communities, interstitial organisms, and atrophic relationships. Lab sessions include field experiences, group projects and report writing. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

BIO-101, BIO-203

BNF-101 Principles of Banking

This course presents the fundamentals of bank and financial services functions in a descriptive fashion so that the beginner banker may acquire a broad and operational perspective. Topics considered include fundamentals of negotiable instruments, contemporary banking issues, and developments within the banking industry. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

BNF-102 Personal Finance and Money Management

This course provides students with a basic understanding of personal finance so that they may properly manage their own financial affairs. Topics include: financial planning, budgeting and income taxes; managing savings plans, credit cards and debt problems; renting vs. buying; health, disability and life insurance; investing in stocks, bonds and mutual funds; and retirement planning, wills and estate planning. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

BNF-103 Sports Finance

This course provides students with a foundation of financial practices associated with the sports industry. Analysis of financial statements, risk, time value of money, financial ratios, budgeting, debt and equity financing, facility financing, park and recreation agencies, feasibility studies, and other relevant financial matters associated with college athletics and professional sports. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

BNF-201 Principles of Finance

This course provides the beginning student with awareness and a basic conceptual understanding of financial theory and practice. Topics considered include financial analysis and control, working capital management, capital budgeting, long term financing, financial leverage, and financial ratios. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ACC-110, BUS-101

BNF-202 Asset Management

This course provides an overview of the asset management industry, the products and services it provides, and how assets management professionals can help potential and existing customers. Principal topics covered are: types of assets, investment vehicles, agencies, wills and the probate process, customer relationships, guardianships and Powers of Attorney, personal trusts andselling, hedge funds, marketing and competition. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BNF-101 or BUS-101

BNF-203 Cash Management

This course introduces the student to the importance of cash management in business and the basic concepts of cash, credit and collection. Topics include cash management tools, the payments system, international cash management, general uses of credit, use of financial statements and financial ratios to make credit-related decisions, and policies and procedures for handling collections. Other topics, such as technology, customer relationship, banking relationship, and finance companies, may be included. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ACC-110, BUS-101

BNF-207 Principles of Investment and Portfolio Management

This course examines investment instruments, the investment process and markets and investment strategies. Students will explore the characteristics of stocks, bonds, options, futures, and other investment vehicles. Portfolio theory will be studied. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ACC-110, BUS-101

BNF-208 International Finance

This course provides students with an understanding of international financial transactions. Topics covered included balance of payment problems with their attendant trade barriers and restrictions, methods of payment and their inherent risks, and strategies to optimize export financing and foreign capital investment yields. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

[BUS-201 or BUS-262], ACC-110

BNF-292 Co-Op Work Experience [Banking and Finance]

This course is a recommended elective for all students who are pursuing an Associate in Applied Science degree in the Banking, Credit and Finance curriculum. It is designed to provide practical banking and/or credit management experience in a college-approved work environment. All job situations are monitored by the college for their conformity to established guidelines for suchcourses. Job placement assistance is available through the Co-Op Office. 1 lecture, 2 credits plus 120 minimum hours work experience distributed over the semester. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [8.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

BNF-101

BNF-293 Co-Op Work Experience [Banking and Finance]

This course provides the student with practical, supervised experience in various areas of finance and banking. Through on-the-job experience, students acquire some of the practical expertise and knowledge needed to pursue a career in these fields. Students are supervised by a faculty member and job placement assistance is available through the Co-Op Office. 1 lecture, 3 credits plus 225 minimum hours work experience distributed over the semester. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [12.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BNF-101, BNF-102, BNF-203

BUS-101 Introduction to Business

This course is a study of the activities that make up the field of business. Some of the topics covered are the ownership, organization, and management of business; finance; marketing; unions; and government regulations. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

BUS-102 Retailing

This course provides the student with the fundamental principles of retailing and their application in small, medium-sized, and large stores. Topics include store location, layout, and organization; consumer behavior and customer relationships; employee training and motivation; sales forecasting, and inventory management; information flow; merchandising; and strategies to gain acompetitive edge in the local and global marketplace. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

BUS-103 Business Mathematics

This course provides a background in the principles and problems related to banking, interest, depreciation, and the pricing of merchandise. Attention is also given to commercial paper, consumer credit, and various taxes. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

MAT-011

BUS-104 Customer Service

Customer Service emphasizes the relevance of customer service in all types of businesses. Topics include: importance of customer service, external and internal customers, cost of poor customer service, challenges of customer service, ethics in customer service, problem solving, empowerment, effective communication, dealing with difficult customers, motivation and leadership, customer retention and measurements of customer satisfaction. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

BUS-105 Business Communications

This course covers the communications skills of writing, speaking and listening, with particular application to the field of business. Emphasis is placed on effective techniques to be used in interviews and meetings. Students learn how to prepare business letters, memos, and reports. Oral presentations are included. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

BUS-106 Effective Selling

Effective Selling presents current theories and practices for salespersons of consumer and industrial goods and services. Topics include: evaluation of customer needs, importance of product data, buying motives, the development of sales presentations, personal qualifications of the salesperson and career opportunities. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

BUS-107 e-Tailing

This course covers the key critical success factors and business concepts serving as the foundation of the fastest growing segment of the overall total retailing area. The course covers the unique approaches of B2B, B2C, and C2B organizations. Web hosting alternatives, search engine optimization, legal/ethical considerations, and supply chain factors are emphasized for their importance. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

BUS-110 Transportation Logistics and Supply Chain Management

This course covers the basic concepts and processes in distributing goods and services within a supply chain environment. The course covers trends in globalization, technology, and supply/demand planning. Specific topics include demand forecasting, collaborative planning procurement, inventory fundamentals, transportation alternatives, warehousing logistics, materials handling,and packaging. The course also addresses strategic and operational aspects of transport management, information systems architecture, e-Commerce, and third party logistics. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

BUS-111 Introduction to Healthcare Administration

This course is designed to introduce the student to health care delivery systems around the world and to apply management principles to the medical industry. Topics covered in this course are health care delivery systems, finance, management models, collective bargaining, budgets, marketing strategies, and leadership. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Cross Listed Courses

HSC-101

BUS-115 Introduction to Nonprofit Organizations

This course examines the principles, techniques, and administration of the not-for-profit sector. Topics include the history, missions, and distinctions of nonprofits, as well as their governance, funding and development, financial framework, accountability, management, marketing, as well as their relationships with government and profit sectors. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

BUS-116 Funding and Grant Management

This course examines the requirements to launch and conduct a viable fundraising program for a nonprofit organization. Emphasis is placed on matching organizational needs and programs to available funding resources. Topics include the search for funding, writing effective funding proposals and solicitation letters, the nature and requirements of grant writing for nonprofits, andgrant management. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

BUS-117 Fundraising for Nonprofit Organizations

This course is a study that examines the principles, techniques, and art of fundraising within the not-for-profit sector. Topics include the funding and development, technology choices, legal and ethical issues of nonprofits, financial framework, accountability, and relationships with donors. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

BUS-118 Principles of Publishing Operations

This course provides the student with the fundamental principles of the publishing industry. Topics include the industry's organizational structure and subdivisions, operations management, the economics of publishing, technological impacts on publishing, global publishing using electronic resources, legal considerations and standardization, producers, suppliers, and transportation logistics. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

BUS-120 Social Networking for Business

This course is designed to provide the student with both the theory and application of social networking as it relates to the field of business. Topics include the social media as a marketing tool, using social networking for customer tracking and data analysis, establishing media entries and presence for effective advertising, gauging customer satisfaction by surveys, pages andBLOGs, establishing and maintaining customer loyalty, and building an electronic newsletter. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

BUS-129 Event Planning and Management I

This course will provide the information and tools needed to meet the needs and expectations of meeting and event participants in an ever-changing profession and conceptual age, with content relevant to the required daily activities and decisions. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Cross Listed Courses

HRM-129

BUS-150 Sport and Team Branding

This course examines brand management as it applies to sports and sport merchandising. Study includes the impact, desire, and profitability of branding; developing and executing a successful brand strategy; building, measuring, and managing brand equity; as well as leveraging the marketing mix to build a high-demand brand platform with a strong customer focus by integrating merchandise items with creative sponsorships. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

BUS-170 Small Business Management

This course introduces the student to the basic knowledge and skills necessary for managing or owning a small business. Topics include getting started, planning and managerial skills, inventory, finance, risk management, marketing, taxation, and community responsibility. Students will analyze a variety of cases. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

BUS-201 Marketing Principles

This course introduces the student to the principles, functions, and tools of modern marketing practices. The interrelationship among product, price, promotion, and distribution decisions on the success of an organization is emphasized. The impact of the economic, competitive, socio-cultural, technological, and legal-regulatory forces in the marketing environment are explored. The similarities and differences in the marketing of goods, services, and ideas are considered. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BUS-101 or BUS-115

BUS-202 International Marketing

This course introduces the student to the global marketing environment and to the diverse factors which shape it. Topics of discussion include product, pricing, promotion, and distribution decisions as they relate to the international marketplace for goods and services. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BUS-101

BUS-203 Sports Marketing

This course applies a marketing focus on the sports industry. Study includes target marketing and segmentation, sponsorship, promotions, events, and the creation of an optimum marketing mix for sport products. This course also examines the pricing dynamics of sport, sports franchising and managing controversial issues, for example, those surrounding celebrities. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BUS-101

BUS-205 Entrepreneurship

This course is an overview of the concepts and principles of business development and management. The use of case study analysis facilitates practical understanding and appreciation of business concepts. In addition, students gain further practical knowledge through the use of the Internet. The course provides a comprehensive perspective of ownership and management of a small business or new venture. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BUS-101

BUS-207 Principles of Business Management

This course introduces the student to the management process through which an organization utilizes human, financial, physical, information and entrepreneurial resources effectively and efficiently to accomplish the organization's objectives. The managerial functions of planning, organizing, staffing, communicating, leading, and controlling are explored within the context of a rapidly changing and increasingly diverse global society. The ethical implications of management decisions are emphasized. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BUS-101 or BUS-115

BUS-208 Human Resources Management

This course examines procedures to be followed in supervising workers under applicable legal and contractual agreements. Techniques of hiring, training, evaluation, promotion, remedial action, and dismissal are examined. Special attention is devoted to relations with unions. Case studies are emphasized, and student participation is encouraged through role playing, visual aids, and personal projects. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BUS-101 or BUS-115

BUS-210 e-Marketing

This course explores the use of the Internet, World Wide Web, and online social networking on the marketing of goods, services, and ideas. Topics include identification of web-based marketing goals; selection of the appropriate Web-based marketing strategy; conducting primary and secondary marketing research; Web-design criteria; Web-based advertising techniques; and revenue streams. Students will develop and integrated Internet marketing plan, including development of a Web presence, for an organization. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BUS-101 or BUS-115 or BUS-170 or BUS-201

BUS-211 Internet Law

This course introduces the student to the complexities of the legal environment in the information age with a special focus on E-commerce. Topics covered include: basic contract law; current and future contract law for E-commerce; contracting and licensing software; torts and cybertorts; privacy and government regulations; intellectual property laws including patents, trade secrets, copyrights and trademarks; and Internet agreements. Students will review and analyze actual cases. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

[BUS-101 or BUS-170] and INF-163

BUS-229 Event Planning and Management II

This course will provide the information and tools needed to meet the needs and expectations of participants of meeting and event participants in an ever-changing profession and conceptual age, with content relevant to the required daily activities and decisions. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BUS-129 or HRM-129

Cross Listed Courses

HRM-229

BUS-233 Business Law I

This course is a survey of the law as it applies to business. It covers the law of contracts, torts, crimes, and commercial paper and analyzes the New Jersey Court System. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BUS-101

BUS-234 Business Law II

This course continues the survey of business law and covers sales, consumers? rights, bailments, insurance, partnerships, and corporations. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BUS-233

BUS-250 Advertising

This course is designed to give the student a broad view of advertising principles and their relationship to marketing. The student will select and use different media, conduct market research, write copy, and prepare advertising layouts. An advertising campaign will be completed as a term project. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BUS-201

BUS-251 Sports Merchandising and Promotion

This course examines merchandising management as it relates to the sports industry. Study includes theories of successful sport merchandising; examination of the planning, implementation and control of sport sales and promotion; use of technology, such as holograms, to protect brand validity; licensing; outlet venues for merchandise; organizing a sports promotion and sales campaign; as well as e-commerce merchandising as a strategic resource of a sports team website. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BUS-101 or BUS-150 or WEX-127 or PSY-111 or BUS-203

BUS-262 Fundamentals of International Business

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the institutional and practical aspects of international business. Principal topics presented include global business environments, strategies for international management, marketing, finance, and relevant legal and political considerations. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BUS-101

BUS-271 e-Commerce

This course explores how small and large businesses use the Internet to increase or create their market presence. Students will design and develop a prototype of an electronic enterprise suitable for the Web. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BUS-101

BUS-283 Co-Op Work Experience [Food Marketing]

This course enables the student to learn and practice food marketing skills under professional guidance in a college approved work environment. The student's work is supervised by a trained faculty member. Students must work a minimum number of hours for the semester and attend the weekly seminar. Plus 180 minimum hours work experience distributed over the semester. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [11.00].

Credits

3

Corequisites

BUS-268

BUS-284 Co-Op Work Experience [Food Marketing]

This course enables the student to learn and practice food marketing skills under professional guidance in a college approved work environment. The student's work is supervised by a trained faculty member. Students must work a minimum number of hours for the semester and attend the weekly seminar. 1 lecture, 4 credits plus 240 minimum hours work experience distributed over thesemester. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [15.00].

Credits

4

Corequisites

BUS-268

BUS-293 Co-Op Work Experience [Business Administration]

This course provides the student with practical, supervised experience in various areas of business management, marketing, or international business. Through on the job experience, students acquire some of the practical expertise and knowledge needed to pursue a career in these fields. Students are supervised by a faculty member and job placement assistance is available through the Co-Op Office. 1 lecture, 3 credits plus 225 minimum hours work experience distributed over the semester. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [14.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BUS-201 or BUS-202 or BUS-207 or BUS-208

CHM-100 Introduction to Chemistry

This course is designed to give non-science majors awareness and an understanding of the fundamental concepts of modern chemistry. Topics covered include measurement, atomic theory, chemical bonding, the periodic table, chemical reactions, and stoichiometry. The course includes a writing and communications requirement that relates the topics covered to a broad historical, social, and cultural context. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

MAT-011

CHM-102 Chemistry in Context

This course is a student-centered approach for non-science majors to learn fundamental chemistry and its linkage to consumer issues, public policy, business and international affairs. Core topics taught include chemistry terminology, formulas, reactions, scientific measurements, shapes of molecules, chemical toxicity, green chemistry, consumer chemistry and energy sources. Laboratory activities emphasize fundamental concepts and measurements. Use of scientific and governmental Web sites, papers, presentations and discussion groups draw on students' major fields of study. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

MAT-011

CHM-110 Basic Biochemistry

This course is a course for Dental Hygiene students. Principles of atomic theory, chemical bonding, and chemical reactions are studied with an emphasis on acids and bases. The structure and function of the major groups of organic compounds are studied in order to provide a basis for understanding the nature and role of the major classes of biochemical compounds such as carbohydrates and proteins. The study of enzymes is also presented. This course does not substitute for CHM-112. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

MAT-011

CHM-112 College Chemistry

This course is a survey of the fundamentals of inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, and biochemistry. Topics taught in inorganic chemistry include atomic theory, chemical bonding, chemical reactions, nomenclature, gas laws, and acid-base buffers. The structure and function of the major classes of organic compounds are studied. Topics in biochemistry covered include proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids, and enzymes. The course includes a writing and communications requirement that relates the topics covered to a broad historical, social, and cultural context. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

MAT-011; minimum grade C

CHM-140 General Chemistry I

This course is a study of the fundamental laws and theories of chemistry. Topics covered include units of measurement, dimensional analysis, stoichiometry, aqueous reactions, thermochemistry, electronic structure of the atom, periodicity, chemical bonding, molecular geometry and properties of gases. >General Education Course. lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CHM-100

Corequisites

CHM-141

CHM-141 General Chemistry - Lab

This course is designed to familiarize the student with chemical laboratory techniques through problem solving experiments. It complements material covered in CHM-140. Written lab reports are required. >General Education Course. Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

1

Corequisites

CHM-140

CHM-212 Organic and Biochemistry [Spring Only]

This course is designed to give students an understanding of the principles of Organic Chemistry and of Biochemistry. The study of Organic Chemistry will emphasize a functional group approach. Topics studied will include hydrocarbons, alcohols, carbonyl compounds, and amines. Topics taught in Biochemistry will include carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, bioenergetics, enzymes, and biosynthetic pathways. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

[CHM-140 or CHM-112], MAT-011

CHM-240 General Chemistry II

This is the second course of a two-semester sequence of general chemistry. Topics covered include intermolecular forces, properties of solutions, chemical kinetics, equilibrium, thermodynamics, acids and bases, and electrochemistry. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00]. 1

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CHM-140; MAT-160; minimum grade C

Corequisites

CHM-241

CHM-241 General Chemistry II - Lab

This course is a continuation of CHM-141, with greater emphasis on more sophisticated experiments and equipment. It complements the material covered in CHM-240. Written lab reports are required. >General Education Course. Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

CHM-140, CHM-141; minimum grade C

Corequisites

CHM-240

CHM-260 Organic Chemistry I

This course is a study of the fundamental classes of organic compounds, with emphasis on the relationship of structure and reactivity. Electronic theory, energy relationships, stereochemistry, and reaction mechanisms are used to explain reactivity. Molecular modeling is emphasized, particularly with respect to electrostatic potential maps. Practical applications, including syntheses, are studied and carried out in the laboratory. Instrumentation such as UV, IR, NMR, HPLC, and GC/MS are routinely used as qualitative and quantitative tools. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

CHM-240, CHM-241

CHM-262 Organic Chemistry II

This course is a continuation of CHM-260 and includes the study of aromatic and organometallic compounds, spectroscopy, and the chemistry of carbonyl compounds. Topics presented include the theoretical basis for molecular reactivity, molecular modeling, determination of structure with emphasis on spectroscopic methods, mechanisms of chemical reactions, and synthesis of organic compounds. The microscale laboratory emphasizes preparation, purification, and identification of organic compounds. Analysis by IR, GC, GC/MS, NMR, and UV/VIS are integral to experiments. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

CHM-260

CIN-140 Introduction to Cinema

This course is a study of film as an art form. The course is designed to awaken a more sensitive and critical response to the cinema through an understanding of its form, content, development, and criticism. Films are screened to demonstrate these elements. >General Education Course. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Cross Listed Courses

THR-140

CIN-150 Special Topics in Cinema I

This course permits specialized topics in cinema to be studied as a part of more general courses. Students may repeat this course for separate credit. Topics may include, but are not limited to, Women in Cinema, History of Animation, and World Cinema. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

CIN-160 Women in Cinema

This course is a study of how the images, stories, and formal constructions in film can frame female identities. The course is not only about the representation of women in film history, it is also a study of cinema by women [such as Maya Deren, Su Friedrich, and Chantal Akerman.] Specific topics addressed over the span of the semester may include the history of the "weepies; "the biographies of certain actors and filmmakers; feminist film theory; the formal aspects of film; the depiction of women across film genres; and the role of filmmaking in the American and international feminist movements. >Diversity Course. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

CIN-170 American Cinema

This course is a study of the language, history, and cultural impact of the American Film Industry. It explores the technology and aesthetics of Hollywood and non-Hollywood films. It also deals with how these films reflect the changing images Americans have had of themselves. Through in-class screenings, students will gain an understanding of each film's form, content, development, and criticism. Some specific areas covered include film production and language, the Studio System, and film genres. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

CIN-250 Special Topics in Cinema II

This course permits specialized topics in cinema to be studied as a part of more general courses. These courses require that students have had some experience using basic cinema terminology [e.g., shot structure, camera movement] through a 100 Level Cinema course. Students may repeat this course for separate credit. Topics may include, but are not limited to, Major Filmmakers,Documentary Cinema, Avant-Garde Cinema, Classic Cinema and Film Noir. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CIN-140 or THR-140 or CIN-150 or ART-105

CIS-158 Introduction to Computer Science

This course is intended for students who are interested in an algorithmic approach to problem solving using computers and their applications. Topics presented include terminology used in the computer field, introduction to computer systems and their applications. Students will work with various software packages on a microcomputer. >General Education Course. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

MAT-040 or MAT-048 or equivalent by testing

CIS-163 Computer Programming QBasic

This course is an introduction to programming techniques using the QBASIC language. Students learn how to develop programs for various applications, and they obtain extensive hands-on experience in the operation and use of a microcomputer. The course is intended for students in the liberal arts and sciences. Students with prior programming experience should take CIS-266 ComputerProgramming: Visual BASIC. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

MAT-040 or MAT-048 or MAT-160

CIS-165 Fundamentals of Programming

This course is an introduction to computer systems and structured programming techniques. Topics considered include an introduction to the components of a computer system; problem solving and algorithm design; standard data types and declarations; input and output techniques; operators; library functions; fundamental control statements; arrays and strings; data sorting; and files. Applications are selected from various fields of study. >General Education Course. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

MAT-048 or MAT-160 or equivalent by testing

CIS-265 Advanced Programming Concepts

This course is a continuation of CIS-165 C++ Programming I. Topics considered include functions; structured programming principles; pointer arithmetic; multidimensional arrays; fundamental sorting and searching algorithms; structures; unions; sequential and random access file processing algorithms; and the run-time behavior of programs. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CIS-165

CIS-266 Computer Programming: Visual Basic

This course is an introduction to a programming tool for developing user-friendly Windows applications in the QBASIC programming language. It is intended for the student who has already learned the fundamental programming structures of a computer language. After a review of the fundamentals of QBASIC, Visual BASIC tools will be studied and incorporated into applications using modular programming techniques, arrays, sorting and searching techniques, and sequential and random access files. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CIS-163 or CIS-165

CIS-270 Programming for Science Applications

This course is a computer programming language course with emphasis on mathematical, scientific, and engineering applications using structured programming principles. Topics covered include data types, specifications, fixed and floating point arithmetic, input and output techniques, multidimensional arrays, external functions and subroutines. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

MAT-180

CIS-271 Computer Organization and Assembly Language

This course is a study of the interactions between hardware and software necessary for understanding the organization and application of computer systems. Topics to be considered include data representation, Boolean algebra and computer logic, the central processing unit and program execution, main memory, classes of machine language instructions, addressing formats, addressingmodes, and the fundamentals of assembly language programming. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CIS-165

CIS-277 Data Structures and Algorithms

This course is a study of the representation and implementation of abstract data types and related algorithms that are used in computer science. Topics considered include lists, strings, stacks, queues, trees, graphs, networks, file structures, recursive functions, sorting techniques, searching techniques, hashing, and analysis of algorithms. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CIS-265; minimum grade C

CIS-278 Database Systems

This course is an introduction to the design and implementation of database systems. Topics considered include database architecture, physical data organization, the Entity-Relationship model, the hierarchical, network, and relational models of data, normalization theory, data definition languages and query facilities, data integrity and security, and programming language interfaces. Students use a DBMS to develop an actual database. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CIS-265 or CIS-266

CIS-287 Object-Oriented Programming

This course is an introduction to the object-oriented approach to program development. Topics considered include classes and their implementation, static members, friend functions, composite classes, functions and operator overloading, inheritance, polymorphism and an introduction to object-oriented analysis and design. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CIS-265

CIS-288 Discrete Math [Computer Science]

This course is a study of the mathematical theory and techniques that underlie computer science. Topics considered include set theory, induction, counting techniques, relations and functions, recurrence relations, trees, graphs, Boolean algebra and circuits, grammars and an introduction to automata theory. Applications of these topics in computer science are included in the course. Lecture [4.00].

Credits

4

Corequisites

CIS-265

CIS-289 Systems Analysis and Design [Computer Science]

This course is an introduction to the terminology, concepts, and tools for these two phases of the system development life cycle. Topics considered include preliminary investigation, information requirements analysis, project management, data specification, data flow diagrams, logical data modeling, process specification, structure charts, design techniques, design criteria, andpackaging. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Corequisites

CIS-277

COM-100 Speech Communication

This course guides students through the methods of organizing, delivering, and evaluating the spoken word in various speech situations. Intrapersonal and interpersonal communication in conjunction with public address is studied. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

COM-101 Mass Media Communication

This course is a study of the print and broadcast media. The roles of media in society, a history of media, and the legal control of media are explored. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

COM-102 Public Speaking

This is a course in effective speaking in academic, workplace, and public environments which stresses organization, effective delivery, and critical listening skills. A strong emphasis is placed on student performance to help the student gain speaking practice and develop self-confidence in a variety of speaking situations. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

COM-103 Introduction Radio and Television Broadcasting

This course is a study of American broadcasting and its historical antecedents. This course is designed to survey the technical, economic, regulatory, aesthetic, and philosophical bases of broadcasting. Current production techniques utilized in radio and television is examined. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

COM-105 Radio Production

This hands-on course is designed to give the student experience in writing, directing and producing a variety of radio formats. Radio commercials, dramas, musical programs, and actualities are considered in this course. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

COM-106 TV Production I

This is a practical, hands-on course that is designed to give the student experience in writing, directing, and producing a variety of television programs. Students apply theories, principles and skills of TV and videotape techniques through camera usage, control room operations, and videotape editing. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

COM-110 Print Journalism Production

This is a hands-on course in which students write for, edit, and produce "The Torch," the student newspaper of Bergen Community College. This course covers such topics as reporting, news story editing, ethical and legal issues for student newspapers, news photography and photo editing, formatting, layout, and design. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

COM-111 Video Post-Production

This is a hands-on course designed to train students in advanced post-production techniques utilizing non-linear computer based editing. Audio sweetening, computer graphics, and animation will be discussed. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

COM-114 Intercultural Communication

This course provides the student with practical information regarding the problems present in communicating with people of other cultures. It also explores cross-cultural differences in the communication process in order to learn how to communicate effectively with one another across cultural boundaries. >Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

COM-116 Interpersonal Communication

This course is a study of the way people communicate in the process of developing and maintaining relationships. Class activities include the analysis of communication in dyadic and small group situations. The following topics are examined with respect to their effects on interpersonal communication: self-awareness, shyness and assertiveness, listening, attraction, conflict, loneliness, and love. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

COM-122 Argumentation and Debate

This is a course in the methods of effective argumentation, persuasion, and educational debate, with emphasis on rational decision-making. This course is designed for students who want preparation for participation in a democratic society. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

COM-140 Introduction to Multimedia

This course is a course that introduces the student to the various applications of computer-based Multimedia in industry, government, education, and entertainment. Hardware systems, videodisc design, flow charts, software tools, scripts, and production will be covered. Students will work in groups to design and prepare a multimedia presentation. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Cross Listed Courses

INF-140

COM-160 Sound for Visual Media

Sound for Visual Media ia a hands-on course exploring the ways dialogue, sound effects and music intertwine with various forms of visual media including film, video, and multimedia content. Topics include diegetic vs. non-diegetic sound, Foley, location sound, automated dialogue replacement, voiceover recording, recording techniques, mixing, and signal processing. Students will study how sound has been used historically in visual media, as well as create their own soundscapes. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00]

Credits

3

Cross Listed Courses

ART-160, MUS-160

COM-201 Introduction to Journalism

This course is a study of the fundamentals of reporting with emphasis on the modern news story. Elements of news style, structure of news stories, news sources, ethics, and the mechanics of newspaper production are considered. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101; minimum grade C

COM-205 Advanced Radio Production

This is a hands-on course designed to produce broadcast quality programs. Directing, writing, technical, editing and voice utilization skills will be emphasized. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

COM-105

COM-206 Writing for the Mass Media

This course provides a survey of provides a survey of media formats and writing techniques for print and broadcast. Students are introduced to the forms and methods used to prepare information for the various mass media including magazines, newspapers, radio, television and the Web. Public relations writing and preparing advertising copy are also covered. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

Corequisites

COM-101

COM-207 TV Production II

This is a course that provides the student with an opportunity to refine existing skills through the production of a regularly scheduled public affairs program. A functional awareness of all factors involved in the production of a series on a regular basis is developed. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

COM-106

COM-208 Directing for Television

This course is an introduction to television directing and to the pre-production steps necessary to the creation of a television program. The theoretical development of formats, lighting, set determinations, and crew selection are considered. Students are required to direct a variety of television program formats. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

COM-106

COM-210 Public Relations

This course is a study of the basic principles and practices of promotion including history, development, ethics, and media selection. Emphasis will be placed on preparing news releases, advisement for coverage, and press kits for target audiences. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

COM-212 Copy Editing

This course provides hands-on training in all phases of editing and preparing news copy for publication in various print and online media, and the writing of headlines and photo captions and cutlines. It covers local news, wire copy, assembling and shaping the various elements of news stories, the requirements of news style and safeguards against errors. Lecture: [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101; minimum grade C

COM-281 Co-Op Work Experience [Journalism]

This course gives students work experience in a newspaper office and provides the opportunity to acquire and apply skills in news writing, photojournalism, layout and/or newspaper production. Work sites must be approved by the faculty coordinator. Co-Op job placement assistance is available through the Co-Op Office. 60 minimum hours work experience distributed over the semester.Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [3.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

COM-201

COM-282 Co-Op Work Experience [Journalism]

This course gives students work experience in a newspaper office and provides the opportunity to acquire and apply skills in news writing, photojournalism, layout and/or newspaper production. Work sites must be approved by the faculty coordinator. Co-Op job placement assistance is available through the Co-Op Office. 120 minimum hours work experience distributed over the semester. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [7.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

COM-201

COM-283 Co-Op Work Experience [Journalism]

This course gives students work experience in a newspaper office and provides the opportunity to acquire and apply skills in news writing, photojournalism, layout and/or newspaper production. Work sites must be approved by the faculty coordinator. Co-Op job placement assistance is available through the Co-Op Office.180 minimum hours work experience distributed over the semester.Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

COM-201

COM-291 Co-Op Work Experience [Media]

This is a field work course in media production, planning, or programming on an individual basis. The student must attend weekly seminars and/or prepare reports or other projects as required by the departmental staff. Credit is based on work with an approved broadcast or non-broadcast organization, including television and radio stations, networks, production houses, and cableTV operations. Available for 1 to 4 credits. Job placement assistance is available through the Co-Op Office. 60 minimum hours work experience distributed over the semester. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [3.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

COM-105 or COM-106

COM-292 Co-Op Work Experience [Media]

This course is a field work course in media production, planning, or programming on an individual basis. The student must attend weekly seminars and/or prepare reports or other projects as required by the departmental staff. Credit is based on work with an approved broadcast or non-broadcast organization, including television and radio stations, networks, production houses, andcable TV operations. Available for 1 to 4 credits. Job placement assistance is available through the Co-Op Office.120 minimum hours work experience distributed over the semester. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [8.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

COM-105 or COM-106

COM-293 Co-Op Work Experience [Media]

This is a field work course in media production, planning, or programming on an individual basis. The student must attend weekly seminars and/or prepare reports or other projects as required by the departmental staff. Credit is based on work with an approved broadcast or non-broadcast organization, including television and radio stations, networks, production houses, and cableTV operations. Available for 1 to 4 credits. Job placement assistance is available through the Co-Op Office. 180 minimum hours work experience distributed over the semester. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [12.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

COM-105 or COM-106

COM-294 Co-Op Work Experience [Media]

This is a field work course in media production, planning, or programming on an individual basis. The student must attend weekly seminars and/or prepare reports or other projects as required by the departmental staff. Credit is based on work with an approved broadcast or non-broadcast organization, including television and radio stations, networks, production houses, and cableTV operations. Available for 1 to 4 credits. Job placement assistance is available through the Co-Op Office. 240 minimum hours work experience distributed over the semester. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [16.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

COM-105 or COM-106

CRJ-101 Introduction to Criminal Justice

This course analyzes the history, development, and function of the police in a free society. A primary concern in the course is the relationship between the various components of the criminal justice system and the effectiveness of the system as a mechanism for social control. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

CRJ-102 Introduction to Corrections

This course is an overview of the history and philosophical foundations of the American correctional system. This course examines the organization and operation of the correctional system and correctional treatment programs ranging from pre-trial diversion to post-incarceration procedures. The course analyzes current issues and problems in corrections such as social control within prisons, legal rights of prisoners, and alternatives to imprisonment. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

CRJ-103 Criminal Law

This course is a study of the philosophy and development of the law and development of law of criminal procedure and its constitutional provisions. Topics included in the course are principles of criminal law and the adversary system, police authority, relative to the laws of arrest, search and seizure, and a review of relevant U.S. Supreme Court decisions. CRJ-101 Introductionto Criminal Justice is highly recommended before taking this course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

CRJ-105 Police Administration

This course provides a review, analysis, and synthesis of the proactive, traditional scientific and human relations approaches to police management. The basics of administering a police organization such as recruitment and selection of personnel, training, fiscal and planning operations, and auxiliary and staff functions are reviewed. Changes relative to socioeconomic, political, and technological realities are explored. CRJ-101 Introduction to Criminal Justice is highly recommended before taking this course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

CRJ-107 Criminology

This course the criminal justice system with an emphasis on the structure and operation of its components and on the modes of societal responses to crime and criminals. It reviews the development, philosophy, and concepts of criminal law and analyzes the leading theoretical perspectives on criminal behavior and criminal typologies. SOC-101 Sociology is highly recommended beforetaking this course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

CRJ-108 Topics in Criminal Justice

This course is an introductory study of major topics in policing, corrections, and the courts, including but not limited to such topics as judicial misconduct, law enforcement stress management, terrorism, criminalistics, prison gangs, sex offenders, domestic violence, and suicide by police. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

CRJ-109 Contemporary Issues in Policing

This course explores the history and scope of the relationship between the police and the community. Community relationships are examined from psychological and sociological perspectives. The course analyzes police issues such as media relations; citizen grievances; civilian review boards; selection, training, and education of personnel; police professionalism; discretionary use of police authority; police unionism; crime prevention; and the role of women in police agencies. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

CRJ-110 Basic Supervision [Criminal Justice]

This course examines the first line supervisor as an integral part of the total management team and as one of the cornerstones upon which successful operations rest. The course analyzes the role of the supervisor as a problem solver and as a key link in the communication process. Topics explored in the course are the supervisor?s expanded responsibilities for planning, training,developing, and motivating employees; counseling, performance appraisal; decision making; and leadership. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

CRJ-111 Criminal Investigation

This course analyzes the essential elements of investigation as a science of inquiry with an emphasis on the legal significance of evidence. Methods of searching for, collecting, preserving, and evaluating physical evidence and the techniques for locating and interviewing witnesses are explored. Organizational investigative functions and the development of an understanding of the crime laboratory and its role in a criminal investigation are also discussed. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

CRJ-112 Crime Prevention

This course examines opportunity reduction strategy as a predictable and controllable variable in addressing the crime problem. The course emphasizes the role of police as community leaders and explores practical concepts and methods through which community involvement can deter crime. The limitations of the criminal justice system are analyzed and a variety of professional, occupational, and voluntary roles in crime prevention are explored. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

CRJ-113 The Juvenile Justice Process

This course examines the history, philosophy, and structure of the juvenile justice system with emphasis on changes fostered by US Supreme Court decisions. The course includes an analysis of the nature and the scope of delinquency in terms of causal theories; issues affecting dependent, neglected, and abused children; juvenile crime prevention programs; and the strategic role ofthe police in developing community resources to serve as alternatives to formal court referral. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

CRJ-114 Correctional Administration

This course is an introduction to the organization and administration of correctional institutions. The course examines both theoretical and practical aspects of correctional administration and focuses on such issues as decision-making, ethical values, human relations, and authority. CRJ-102 Introduction to Corrections is highly recommended before taking this course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

CRJ-115 Correctional Law

This course is an overview of the policies and practices that govern correctional institutions. The course examines current legal issues and many court cases that directly impact on prisons and prisoners. CRJ-102 Introduction to Corrections is highly recommended before taking this course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

CRJ-120 Practical Criminal Evidence

This course focuses on a comprehensive, up-to-date overview of the study of the origin, development, philosophy, and constitutional basis of evidence, constitutional and procedural considerations affecting arrest, search and seizure, kinds and degrees of evidence, and rules governing admissibility, judicial decisions interpreting individual rights, and case studies. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

CRJ-125 Introduction to Security

This course is an examination of the historical, philosophical, and legal bases of security. The course analyzes the role of security in today's society, the concept of professionalism, and the relationship between security and law enforcement functions. Such security concerns as unlawful intrusion, retail theft, internal theft, and other crimes, which seriously threaten the business community, are also discussed. The scope and nature of fire prevention and safety are reviewed in a non-technical manner. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

CRJ-127 Principles of Loss Prevention

This course examines the application of the concepts and procedures that serve to prevent losses due to waste, accidents, error, crime, and unethical practices. The emerging professional status of the loss-control manager and his/her attendant responsibilities are discussed. home loss-control technology, electronic security systems, disaster planning, and fire protection and safety are also reviewed. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

CRJ-201 Ethics in Criminal Justice

This course is the examination of the ethical dimensions of criminal justice administration. Specific attention will be paid to the moral theories and the ethical development of criminal justice officials. Topics will include ethics in law enforcement, ethics in courts, ethics in corrections, the ethics of punishment, policy and management issues, professionalism and pride and ethics for the criminal justice practitioner.
Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CRJ-101

CRJ-283 Co-Op Work Experience [Security]

This course provides the student with practical, supervised experience in various areas of business and institutional security work. Through on-the-job experience, students acquire some of the practical expertise and knowledge needed to pursue a career in this field. Students are supervised by a faculty member, and job placement assistance is available through the Cooperative Education Office. 1 lecture, 3 credits plus 180 minimum hours work experience distributed over the semester. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [12.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CRJ-125

CRJ-291 Co-Op Work Experience [Criminal Justice]

This course provides the student with practical, supervised work experience in the various areas of criminal justice work: police agencies, prosecutors? offices, courts, sheriff's offices, and the correction field. Through on-the-job experience, students can acquire the practical expertise and knowledge needed to pursue a career in this field. Students are supervised by a faculty member, and job placement assistance is available through the Cooperative Education Office. 1 lecture, 1 credit plus 60 minimum hours work experience distributed over the semester. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [3.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

CRJ-101

CRJ-292 Co-Op Work Experience [Criminal Justice]

This course provides the student with practical, supervised work experience in the various areas of criminal justice work: police agencies, prosecutors? offices, courts, sheriff's offices, and the correction field. Through on-the-job experience, students can acquire the practical expertise and knowledge needed to pursue a career in this field. Students are supervised by a faculty member, and job placement assistance is available through the Cooperative Education Office. 1 lecture, 2 credits plus 120 minimum hours work experience distributed over the semester. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [8.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

CRJ-101

CRJ-293 Co-Op Work Experience [Criminal Justice]

This course provides the student with practical, supervised work experience in the various areas of criminal justice work: police agencies, prosecutors? offices, courts, sheriff sheriff's offices, and the correction field. Through on-the-job experience, students can acquire the practical expertise and knowledge needed to pursue a career in this field. Students are supervised bya faculty member, and job placement assistance is available through the Cooperative Education Office. 1 lecture, 3 credits plus 180 minimum hours work experience distributed over the semester. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [12.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CRJ-101

DAN-102 Ballet

This course is a study of the language of ballet as an art form with emphasis on traditional, academic, and technical steps and vocabulary. Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

1

DAN-103 Modern Dance

This course is a study of the technical and choreographic skills of modern dance. Students are assisted in being individually creative through movement. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

DAN-104 Tap Dance

This course is an introduction to elementary tap skills, terminology and rotation, and beginning combinations and simple routines. Purchase of tap shoes is required. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

DAN-105 Jazz Dance

This course is a study of various styles, techniques, and vocabulary in the idiom of jazz dance. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

DAN-108 Dance Improvisation

This course is a guided discovery of the freedom of movement in a medium for the expression and development of ideas. Through the emphasis of space, rhythm, and quality, pieces of choreography are designed. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

DAN-110 Ballroom Dance

This course introduces students to the art and styles of social ballroom dancing and provides the necessary skills and understanding for an appreciation of the artistic, social qualities, and etiquette needed for each of the dances. Throughout the course, students will be introduced to the most popular dances in ballroom: waltz, American tango, swing, cha-cha, foxtrot, and rumba. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

DAN-124 Dance Appreciation

This course is designed to inform the student about dance as a performing art form. Focus is on developing a critical framework for viewing various styles of dance performance. By attending performances, tracing the development of the particular form, studying the demands the art form makes upon its performers, and discussing critics' views and evaluating the experience, students are exposed to a broad representation of dance experiences. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Cross Listed Courses

THR-124

DFT-107 Drafting I

This course is a study of drafting theory and development of drafting skills with an emphasis placed on terminology and procedures used in multi-view projection, sectional views, dimensioning, and pictorial drawing, and computer aided drafting, and architectural drawing. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

2

DFT-207 Drafting II

This course introduces the student to basic theory and design techniques used in a semester 'Reverse Engineering' project in which the student produces dimensioned CAD drawings [CAD], tolerance, assembly, perspectives and advanced isometrics. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

DFT-107

DFT-208 Engineering Graphics

This course is designed to acquaint the student with various types of graphic solutions used in solving engineering and drafting problems. Particular attention is given to orthographic projection as it relates to solving graphical space problems. Methods of visualization relating to auxiliary views, lines and planes, and points are explored in detail to help prepare the studentfor advanced drafting and CAD. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

DFT-107

DFT-209 Civil Engineering Methods

This course builds on the skills obtained in Drafting II and Engineering Graphics. This course will look at business applications of Computer Aided Drafting in the fields of Civil Engineering and Land Surveying. Preparation of site plans for land development, land surveying, and civil engineering documents used in construction will be explored. The course is designed to expose the student to the requirements and opportunities in Civil Engineering and Land Surveying. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

DFT-207, DFT-208

DFT-210 Computer Aided Drafting I

This course introduces the use of computer-aided drafting [CAD] on a PC computer using AutoCAD software. Topics include drawing setup, line drawing, editing, layer creation, display features, and dimensioning. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

DFT-107

Corequisites

DFT-107

DFT-211 Computer Aided Drafting II

This course continues the work of CAD I and covers intermediate level and advanced CAD skills. Included in this course will be file management, blocks, attributes, dynamic blocks, external references, parametric drafting, 3D surfaces and solids, rendering and architectural drawings using AutoCAD Architecture. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [5.00].

Credits

5

Prerequisites

DFT-210

DFT-212 Computer Aided Drafting III

This course is a hands-on experience where students will develop still or animated photo realistic presentations from 2D or 3D CAD drawings. The course includes a study of light and shading techniques, assigning materials to surfaces, graphics file formats, motion techniques used in animations, and output to both video and hard copy devices. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2. 00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

DFT-211

DFT-215 Building Systems

This course provides an understanding of the basic principles and appropriate application of building service and environmental systems, incorporating thermal exposure, climate modification, environmental systems and energy use with a focus on sustainability as these relate to the building envelope. The course also introduces aspects of plumbing, vertical transportation systems,and life safety in building design. An HVAC project will be assigned. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

DFT-107, DFT-207

DFT-262 Architectural Drafting

This course will provide the student with a basic comprehensive study of the field of Residential Architectural Drafting with emphasis on residential construction principles, planning, and specifications. Students will design a residential structure and will prepare a complete set of specifications and construction drawings. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

DFT-207, DFT-208

Corequisites

DFT-265

DFT-263 Architectural Design

This course explores the relationships among the environmental, functional, formal and technological dimensions of architecture. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

DFT-262

DFT-265 Architectural Practice and Planning

This course is designed to provide a student with basic practical, technical, and contractual guidelines for working in a professional architectural environment. Among the topics covered are building codes, zoning, plot and site planning, accessible facilities, construction materials, and architectural presentations. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

DFT-207,DFT-208

Corequisites

DFT-262

DFT-266 Materials and Methods of Construction

This course introduces and discusses the construction process and its role in architecture and design. The course discusses major building component systems and methods. Structural theory is also explored. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

DFT-262

DFT-270 Building Information Modeling

This course will introduce students to the principles and practice of Building Information Modeling. Course exercises and projects are designed to enrich the students' understanding of the potential of this emerging technology on both a practical and theoretical level. The principal software that we will be currently using for this course is Autodesk Revit Architecture. Many ofthe terms and concepts covered will be common to other commercial products characterized as Building Information Modelers. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

DFT-262

DFT-282 Technical Illustration

This course details the techniques used in the preparation of pictorial technical material for illustration and publication. Advanced drawing techniques in axonometric, oblique, and perspectives are covered, as well as basic shading methods used in illustration. Illustration techniques on CAD are also explored. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

DFT-207

DFT-291 Co-Op Work Experience [Drafting]

This course is designed to provide drafting and design students with part-time work experiences so that they may learn and practice under professional guidance in college approved work environments. In addition, weekly seminars are conducted by a college faculty member. Students must apply for these courses through the Co-Op Office, which offers job placement assistance; this application must precede registration for Co-Op courses. 1 lecture, 1 credit plus 60 minimum hours work experience distributed over the semester. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [3.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

DFT-207

DFT-292 Co-Op Work Experience [Drafting]

This course is designed to provide drafting and design students with part-time work experiences so that they may learn and practice under professional guidance in college approved work environments. In addition, weekly seminars are conducted by a college faculty member. Students must apply for these courses through the Co-Op Office, which offers job placement assistance; this application must precede registration for Co-Op courses. 1 lecture, 2 credits plus 120 minimum hours work experience distributed over the semester. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [8.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

DFT-207

DFT-293 Co-Op Work Experience [Drafting]

This course is designed to provide drafting and design students with part-time work experiences so that they may learn and practice under professional guidance in college approved work environments. In addition, weekly seminars are conducted by a college faculty member. Students must apply for these courses through the Co-Op Office, which offers job placement assistance; this application must precede registration for Co-Op courses. 1 lecture, 3 credits plus 180 minimum hours work experience distributed over the semester. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [12.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

DFT-207

DHY-101 Oral Hygiene I

This is the foundation course for clinical dental hygiene practice. Students are introduced to assessment, treatment planning, instrumentation and documentation skills utilizing interactive clinical laboratory sessions and computer assisted learning. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [6.00].

Credits

3

Corequisites

DHY-108, DHY-109, BIO-104

DHY-108 Dental and Oral Anatomy and Physiology

This course examines the anatomy and physiology of the teeth and oral structures. Emphasis is on identification of primary and permanent teeth, classification of occlusion, and description and location of anatomical structures of the head and neck. Dental terminology is defined and related to oral structures through the utilization of dental model devices; computer assisted learning and interactive laboratory sessions. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [4.00].

Credits

2

Corequisites

DHY-101, DHY-109

DHY-109 Oral Embryology and Histology

This course is a comprehensive study of orofacial embryology and the cellular structure of dental and associated glandular and mucosal issues. Emphasis is on clinical considerations of the developmental process so as to be relevant to dental hygiene practice. The relationship between structure and function will be stressed using microscopic and clinical visuals. Lecture [2.00].

Credits

2

Corequisites

DHY-101, DHY-108

DHY-200 Pharmacology for Dental Hygiene

This course examines medications routinely prescribed for medical and dental conditions and the role of the dental hygienist in patient assessment and treatment planning. Systemic medications, complementary medicine, anesthesia, and oral pharmacotherapy will be included. Local anesthetic agents will be emphasized. Lecture [2.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

DHY-101, DHY-201, DHY-205, DHY-207, DHY-209

Corequisites

CHM-110

DHY-201 Oral Hygiene II

This course focuses on providing clinical dental hygiene care to patients throughout the lifespan. The course incorporates age targeted prevention, culture competence, preventive therapies, clinical technologies and an introduction to soft tissue management. Opportunities for community oral health education are included. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [8.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BIO-104, BIO-109, DHY-101, DHY-108, DHY-109

DHY-202 Oral Hygiene III

This course is a continuation and refinement of the clinical therapies integrated in Oral Hygiene II. Special needs patients, oral rehabilitation and clinical technologies are the focus of this course. Both on-campus and off-campus clinical experiences are incorporated. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [12.00].

Credits

4

DHY-203 Oral Hygiene IV

This course is an advanced study of the clinical therapies introduced in Oral Hygiene III. Practice management, clinical technologies, ethics, community outreach, and preparation for dental hygiene licensing are incorporated into this course. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [12.00].

Credits

4

DHY-204 Dental Materials

This course is a comprehensive study of the science, technology, and application of dental materials incorporating reality based dental environment treatment modality scenarios to enhance and compliment both classroom and clinical setting course content. Particular emphasis is placed on various dental material and their specific uses, along with related fundamental and specialtyclinical dental hygiene skills. Specific dental materials are stressed and utilized throughout the didactic, laboratory, and clinical components of the course. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [4.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

Prerequisite[s]: BIO-209, DHY-108, DHY-109, DHY-201, DHY-207, CHM-110

DHY-205 Dental Radiology

This course provides the dental hygiene student with an introduction to the principles and practices of dental radiology. Emphasis is placed on radiographic imaging techniques, film processing procedures, identification of anatomical landmarks and radiographic interpretation. Course content includes an overview of radiation history, physics, biology, protection, quality assurance and risk management. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BIO-104, BIO-109, DHY-101, DHY-108, DHY-109

DHY-206 Community Oral Health I

This partially online course will examine public health/community health issues. It will focus on the role of the dental hygienist in community -based oral health care initiatives. This will include assessment, planning, implementation, and evaluation of public health/community issues. Health care delivery at local, national, and global levels will be discussed including agencies involved in the delivery and finance of oral health services. Lecture [2.00].

Credits

2

DHY-207 General and Oral Pathology

This course examines the relationship between systemic disease and the oral cavity. The course will focus on the understanding of disease process, recognition of deviations from normal and the differential diagnosis of oral manifestations. Computer assisted learning and clinical case studies will be integrated. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

DHY-209 Periodontology I

This course is the study of the principles and concepts of periodontal disease including the tissues surrounding the teeth in both healthy and diseased states. Soft tissue management, periodontal therapies and case management are discussed. The role of systemic disease and periodontal health is also addressed. Lecture [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

BIO-104, BIO-109, DHY-101, DHY-108, DHY-109

DHY-210 Oral Hygiene Enhanced Clinical Techniques

This course is designed to provide clinical experience for either the student returning to the program after an extended absence or the student in need of further clinical skill development. Permission from the Dental Hygiene Academic Department Chair. This course is for students in need of additional clinical skill development and is not a requirement for all dental hygiene students. Laboratory/Clinical [3.00].

Credits

1

DHY-214 Nutrition Dental Health

This course explores basic nutrition as it applies to general and oral health. Students learn to identify patients with dietary and nutritional deficiencies, provide nutritional counseling treatment plans, and adapt behavioral modification techniques. Lecture [2.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

CHM-110, DHY-202

DHY-216 Community Oral Health II

This partially online course will provide students with an opportunity to engage in a community health experience over the course of the semester and apply the principles of Community Oral Health I to a practicum project. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

DHY-219 Periodontology II

This course is an advanced study of the disease process and treatment modalities for periodontal disease. Emphasis is placed on the dental hygienist's role in developing soft tissue management programs including initial therapy, maintenance and evaluation of oral health. Implants, periodontal surgery and oral rehabilitation are also integrated. Case studies, integration of clinical therapies and computer assisted learning are used. Lecture [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

DHY-200, DHY-201, DHY-205, DHY-209, BIO-209

DHY-220 Local Anesthesia for Dental Hygienists

This course is designed to provide the student with the necessary knowledge and skills to administer local anesthesia properly to patients who require pain management during dental hygiene treatment. Special emphasis will be given to the pharmacology of local anesthetic and pain control, injection fundamentals, and the clinical administration of local anesthesia. Local and systemic complications along with legal considerations will also be presented. Laboratory/Clinical [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

DHY-201, DHY-205, DHY-209, BIO-209

Corequisites

DHY-200

DMS-101 Ultrasound Physics and Instrumentation I [Fall Only]

This course will provide the student with the relevant fundamental physical principles as well as the basic instrumentation used in diagnostic ultrasound. Modes of operation, imaging and display techniques that relate to high-frequency sound production will be stressed. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

2

Corequisites

DMS-102, DMS-113, DMS-115

DMS-102 Clinical Medicine and Patient Care [Fall Only]

This course will enable the student to provide quality patient care while demonstrating the application of technical skills needed to perform ultrasound procedures. Medical term definitions will also be presented and practical applications of medical terminology will be covered. An understanding of pertinent emergency care, patient psychology, medical ethics and management skills will be presented. Lecture [2.00].

Credits

2

Corequisites

DMS-101, DMS-113, DMS-115

DMS-113 Abdominal Sonography I [Fall Only]

This course is a comprehensive study of abdominal structures with an emphasis on specialty organ examinations. Knowledge of the diagnosis, history and physical findings, as they pertain to the pathophysiology of abdominal organs and systems are presented. Normal and abnormal tissue patterns are included within the discussions. Students will practice scanning in the lab in preparation for objectives required in Ultrasound Clinic I. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

3

Corequisites

BIO-109, DMS-101, DMS-102, DMS-115

DMS-115 Cross-Sectional Anatomy [Fall Only]

This course involves the study of the structure and function of human anatomy in the cross sectional mode. Topics will include the circulatory system, abdomen, thorax, cranium, pelvis, reproductive system and retroperitoneum. Fetal cross-sectional anatomy will also be presented. The course content will be presented through lectures, discussion, and laboratory exercises. Lecture [3. 00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Corequisites

BIO-109, DMS-101, DMS-102, DMS-113

DMS-201 Ultrasound Physics and Instrumentation II [Spring Only]

This course is a continuance of the study of the physical principles of diagnostic ultrasound. Emphasis will be placed on hemodynamics, Doppler ultrasound, image artifacts, bioeffects, safety, and quality assurance. Advanced instrumentation will also be presented. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

DMS-101, DMS-102, DMS-113, DMS-115

Corequisites

DMS-204, DMS-205, DMS-213, DMS-218

DMS-204 Introduction to Medical Imaging [Spring Only]

This course is a comprehensive course pertaining to different procedures that exist in the Radiology Department. It is an introduction to different modalities and how they interrelate to one another. Special tests will be introduced in each modality with strong emphasis on correlation with ultrasound exams. The course will be divided into certain organ systems and the modalitiesthat are useful in determining certain abnormalities. Students will be shown how different modalities utilize patient testing and the importance of the modality. Topics are chosen according to certain ultrasound procedures. Lecture [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

DMS-102, DMS-113, DMS-218

Corequisites

DMS-201, DMS-205, DMS-213, DMS-218

DMS-205 Obstetric and Gynecological Sonography I [Spring Only]

This course is designed to familiarize students with the pathophysiology of the female reproductive system, gynecological anomalies and normal and abnormal first trimester pregnancy. Pelvic scanning protocol will also be discussed and sonographic interpretation will be utilized. Recognizing the normal and abnormal sonographic patterns in gynecology and first trimester pregnancy will be covered. Pathological and/or physiological data for the interpretation by physicians is stressed. The sonographic criteria for evaluation of the gravid uterus and fetus will be demonstrated. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BIO-109, DMS-102, DMS-113, DMS-115

Corequisites

DMS-201, DMS-204, DMS-213, DMS-218

DMS-213 Abdominal Sonography II [Spring Only]

This course is a continuance of Abdominal Sonography I in studying abdominal structures where an emphasis is placed on specialty organ examinations. Knowledge of the diagnosis, history, and physical findings as they pertain to the pathophysiology of abdominal and small organs are presented. Normal and abnormal tissue patterns are included within this course. Students will practice and master a full abdominal procedure in the lab to prepare them for Ultrasound Clinic II-Abdomen rotation. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BIO-109, DMS-102, DMS-113, DMS-115

Corequisites

DMS-201, DMS-204, DMS-205, DMS-218

DMS-214 Echocardiography I [Fall Only]

This course is an introduction to cardiovascular principles. Topics covered will be anatomy and physiology, pathophysiology, patient assessment that includes palpation and auscultation of the heart and arteries, cardiovascular medications, surgical intervention and interpretation of electrocardiograms. Students will also learn how to perform a limited echo procedure in an attempt to prepare them for Vascular Practicum IV. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BIO-209, DMS-201, DMS-219

Corequisites

DMS-220, DMS-229

DMS-218 Ultrasound Clinic I [Spring Only]

This course requires the student to spend two days a week in an approved hospital Ultrasound Department. Students will perform limited abdominal and pelvic procedures under the direct supervision of the supervising sonographer. Students are given specific learning objectives for the rotation. Progress is evaluated according to a competency-based clinical education system. Clinical [16.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

DMS-101, DMS-102, DMS-113, DMS-115

Corequisites

DMS-201, DMS-204, DMS-205, DMS-213

DMS-219 Ultrasound Clinic II - Abdomen

This course requires the student to spend five days a week in an approved hospital Ultrasound Department. Students will perform complete abdomen procedures under the direct supervision of the supervising sonographer. Students are given specific learning objectives for the rotation. Progress is evaluated according to a competency-based clinical education system. Clinical [40.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

DMS-204, DMS-205, DMS-213, DMS-218

DMS-220 Ultrasound Clinic III - Obstetric and Gynecological Sonography [Fall Only]

This course requires the student to spend two days a week in an approved hospital Ultrasound Department. Students will perform pelvic and obstetrical procedures under the direct supervision of the supervising sonographer. Students are given specific learning objectives for the rotation. Progress is evaluated according to a competency-based clinical education system. Clinical [16.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

DMS-205, DMS-219

Corequisites

DMS-226

DMS-221 Ultrasound Clinic IV - Echocardiography [Spring Only]

This course requires the student to spend two days a week in an approved ultrasound department. Students will perform venous and arterial procedures under the direct supervision of the supervising sonographer. Students are given specific learning objectives for the rotation. Progress is evaluated according to a competency-based clinical education system. Clinical [16.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

DMS-214, DMS-220, DMS-226, DMS-229

Corequisites

DMS-227

DMS-222 Ultrasound Clinic V - Vascular [Summer Only]

This course requires the student to spend five days a week in an approved ultrasound department. Students will perform venous and arterial procedures under the supervision of the designated clinical instructor. Students are given specific learning objectives for the rotation. Progress is evaluated according to a competency-based clinical education system. Clinical [200 hours over the summer session.] .

Credits

1

Prerequisites

DMS-221, DMS-227

Corequisites

DMS-230

DMS-226 Obstetric and Gynecological Sonography II [Fall Only]

This course is a continuance of OB/GYN Sonography designed to familiarize the students with the pathophysiology of the female reproductive pelvic scanning protocol will also be discussed and sonographic interpretation will be utilized in the labs. Normal and abnormal obstetrical patterns will be taught, and emphasis is placed on recognizing the essential sonographic appearance when doing an obstetrical exam in 2nd and 3rd trimester. Chromosomal and congenital anomalies are discussed and the importance of the differential diagnosis. Level II and high risk OB ultrasound are presented. Pathological and/or physiological data for the interpretation by physicians is stressed. The sonographic criteria for evaluation of the gravid uterus, postpartum uterus and the fetus will be demonstrated. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BIO-209, DMS-205, DMS-219

Corequisites

DMS-214, DMS-220

DMS-227 Echocardiography II [Spring Only]

This course is a continuance of Echocardiography, explaining the normal anatomy and physiology of the adult heart. A more in-depth analysis of the physiology/hemodynamics of the heart chambers and muscles are emphasized. Doppler flow patterns and sonographic evaluation of the abnormal heart will be stressed. New techniques as an adjunct tool to Echocardiography will be discussed. Students will perform a complete echo exam in lab in preparation for Vascular Practicum IV. Cardiac measurements of the chambers and muscles will be covered. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

DMS-226, DMS-229

Corequisites

DMS-221, DMS-228

DMS-228 Advanced Ultrasound Practices [Spring Only]

This course is designed to explore new specialty techniques in the areas of Abdomen, Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Echocardiography. Intraoperative procedures will be discussed in all specialties. Specialized equipment will also be emphasized. The course will also focus on legal and ethical issues in sonography. Review of case presentations will be discussed. Independent learning assignments and various lecture formats will enhance the course. Journal articles will be introduced. Neurosonography will be stressed to include normal and abnormal sonographic findings. Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

DMS-226, DMS-229

Corequisites

DMS-221, DMS-227

DMS-229 Vascular Imaging [Fall Only]

This course introduces the use of diagnostic imaging with the use of Doppler for examining the vasculature of the human body. In this class the student will learn about diseases that affect the circulatory system. The course provides a history of diagnosis and treatment of vascular conditions. In addition, the course gives the student an awareness of alternative diagnostic tools used in conjunction with ultrasound. The student will learn how to perform vascular tests commonly performed in vascular laboratories and develop an awareness of tests that are routinely performed. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

BIO-209, DMS-201, DMS-213

Corequisites

DMS-214, DMS-220

DMS-230 Comprehensive Review [Summer Only]

This course will review specialty areas pertinent to sonography in preparation for the ARDMS exam. Emphasis will be placed on ultrasound physics, general and cardiac concentrations. Upon completion of the program, students are eligible to take the ARDMS exams in Abdomen, Ob/Gyn, and Adult Echocardiography. The matrix of ARDMS exams for Abdomen, Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Adult Echocardiography will be followed. Seventy percent of the matrix on all specialties will be reviewed. The remaining 30% will be presented in the program courses specifically focused on the specialties mentioned. Students are required to pass the exit examination in all three specialties as a requirement for program eligibility to take the ARDMS exams. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

DMS-227, DMS-228

Corequisites

DMS-222

EBS-011 Developmental Skills I

This course is the first part of a two-course basic skills sequence designed to improve fundamental academic skills in the areas of reading, writing, and critical thinking. Class instruction emphasizes the development of writing skills, literal and interpretive comprehension of reading texts, sentence structure, grammar and punctuation, and vocabulary. At least 50 minutes per week of this five-hour course meets in a computer lab where there is opportunity for individualized instruction. Lecture [5.00].

Credits

5

EBS-012 Developmental Skills II

This course is the second part of a two-course basic skills sequence designed to improve fundamental academic skills in reading, writing, and critical thinking for students who have not demonstrated mastery in all skill areas introduced in Developmental Skills I. Class instruction emphasizes the development of paragraph and essay writing skills, reading comprehension, sentencestructure, grammar and punctuation, and vocabulary. At least 50 minutes per week of this five-hour course meets in a computer lab where there is opportunity for individualized instruction. Lecture [5.00].

Credits

5

Prerequisites

EBS-011

EBS-021 English Skills

This course is a one-semester course designed to improve fundamental academic skills in reading, writing, and critical thinking. Class instruction emphasizes the development of paragraph and essay writing skills, reading comprehension, sentence structure, grammar and punctuation, and vocabulary. At least 50 minutes per week of this five-hour course meets in a computer lab wherethere is opportunity for individualized instruction. Lecture [5.00].

Credits

5

EBS-033 Directed Studies in Writing II

This course provides the opportunity for students who qualify to accelerate and who are co-enrolled in WRT-101 to learn various strategies and specific skills that will help them to succeed in their WRT-101 course. Students enrolled in the course will receive instruction in critical thinking strategies, critical reading strategies, close reading, summary, paraphrase, direct quote, essay organization, essay coherence, grammar, proper documentation, and word processing. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

EBS-011

Corequisites

WRT-101

EBS-041 Directed-Studies in Writing I

This course is required for students whose scores on the Basic Skills Placement Test indicate a need for intensive instruction in writing. Personalized instruction designed to support the student's activities in English Composition I is offered in this course. Lecture [1.00].

Credits

1

Corequisites

WRT-101

ECO-101 Principles of Macroeconomics

This course provides an analytical and institutional study of the American economy. This course explores issues such as inflation, recession, unemployment, financial markets, money and banking, and the role of government spending and taxation to achieve an optimal allocation of resources, price stability, full-employment level of national income, and long-term growth under the modern market economy. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

ECO-102 Principles of Microeconomics

This course is the study of the organization and operation of the American economy for the production and distribution of goods and services.  This course explores pricing of products and resources in market situations varying from competition to monopoly, as well as behavior of the firm in determining quantity of output and hiring of factors of production.  This course introduces dynamics of resource allocation, price determination and the importance of elasticity in different market structures. General Education Course.  Lecture [3.00].      

Credits

3

ECO-202 Intermediate Microeconomics

This course is designed to deepen student’s understanding and knowledge of theoretical and empirical microeconomic  theory.  Topics  covered  in  the  course  include  consumer  utility  and  choice;  production functions  and  cost;  pricing  of  output  and  inputs  under  various  market  structures  such  as  perfect competition,  monopoly,  monopolistic  competition  and  oligopoly,  as  well  as  externalities  and  public goods.   Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ECO-102

ECO-203 Intermediate Macroeconomics

This course is designed to deepen your understanding and knowledge of theoretical and empirical macroeconomic theory. Topics covered in the course include economic fluctuations; the role of fiscal and monetary policies in stabilizing the economy; the relationship between inflation and unemployment; the role of government policy in promoting long-term economic growth; and dynamics of exchange rate determination in an open economy. 

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ECO-101

ECO-291 Co-Op Work Experience [Economics]

This course provides the student with practical work experience in the area of economics. Students are supervised by a faculty member, and job placement assistance is available through the Cooperative Education Office. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [3.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

ECO-101

ECO-292 Co-Op Work Experience [Economics]

This course provides the student with practical work experience in the area of economics. Students are supervised by a faculty member, and job placement assistance is available through the Cooperative Education Office. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [8.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

ECO-101

ECO-293 Co-Op Work Experience [Economics]

This course provides the student with practical work experience in the area of economics. Students are supervised by a faculty member, and job placement assistance is available through the Cooperative Education Office. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [12 00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ECO-101

EDU-101 Introduction to Education

This introductory course is designed to provide the student with detailed exposure to the realities of teaching and the role of education in our society. Issues of social justice and equity are focal points as they are integrated into discussion about diversity, curriculum and testing, the purpose of schools, student life, law and ethics, and teacher effectiveness. Special features of the course include 20 hours of classroom observation in an off-campus setting. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

EDU-102 Inclusion and the Exceptional Child

This course provides an overview of the curriculum, practices, and legislation pertaining to education in inclusive classroom settings. Topics presented will relate to students who have a variety of special needs, English language learners and other diverse learners. a special feature of this course includes five hours of classroom observation in an inclusive classroom setting. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

EDU-110 Foundations of Multicultural Education

This course develops knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for teaching students from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds. This course further defines concepts presented in social science courses, such as World Geography, Sociology, Anthropology, Economics, and Political Science from the perspective of diverse societies. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

EDU-120 Early Child Development

This course provides an overview of the basic principles and concepts of early childhood education and development. The needs and abilities of young children are analyzed, and directed observations are made in early childhood education programs. Students learn about the Child Development Associate credentialing process. Lecture [2.00]. Laboratory [1.00]

Credits

3

EDU-130 Infants and Toddlers Development

The purposes of this course ae (1) to apply the principles of developmentally appropriate practice to planning, implementing, and evaluating curriculum experiences for infants and toddlers; and (2) to develop strategies for integrating a range of developmental needs and disabilities within the planned curriculum. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

EDU-140 Educational Technology

This course utilizes a brand new state of the art technology lab for instructional purposes. The lab is located in Ender Hall, E-153. Students have access to a Smartboard, iPads and Imac computers as well as new software designed for early childhood education. The course used the lab to expose students to educational technology and the Moodle online platform for the creationand submission of activities and assignments. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [4.00].

Credits

3

EDU-201 Principles and Practices in Education

This course examines various educational theories, methods of instructional planning, student evaluation, and principles of classroom questioning. The nature of cognitive, affective, and skills lessons is also explored. The course instructs students in a broad range of competencies required for state certification. focusing on how to improve the practice of teaching, and equipping students with the skills and strategies to succeed as practitioners. This course includes a required fieldwork component. Lecture [3.00] 1

Credits

3

Prerequisites

EDU-101

EDU-220 Teaching & Learning in the Early Childhood Classroom

This course examines the emergent processes of early childhood development and the best practices for meeting children's education, physical and social/emotional needs for students aged 0-8 years old. This course presents research-based theoretical perspectives for guiding teaching and effectively serving diverse student populations. A special feature of this course is five hours of observation/active participation in an early childhood classroom setting. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

EDU-120

EDU-226 Supervised Field Work Experience

This course features weekly participation in field site classrooms in order to give students an authentic teaching experience. Coursework focuses on creating developmentally appropriate lessons for young learners in preschool through third grade, with an emphasis on presenting mathematics and advancing literacy skills of these young students. All students enrolled in this course will develop a professional teaching portfolio. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [4.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

EDU-120, EDU-220

ELC-100 Introduction to Electronics Technology

This course presents an orientation to the various subspecialties within the field, their interrelationships, and their range of applications. The course also covers introductory topics in electrical and electronics drafting, computer-aided circuit analysis, and electronic fabrication. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

2

ELC-101 DC-Circuit Analysis

This course includes Ohm's and Kirchoff's laws for analysis of series, parallel, and series/parallel circuits, and Thevenin's and Norton's theorems for multiple-loop circuits. Capacitance and inductance transient behavior is also studied, as well as branch, mesh, and node analysis. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

ELC-110 Electric Power Technology

This course covers the basics of power systems for residential, commercial, and industrial applications from a practical viewpoint. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

ELC-120 Photovoltaic [PV] Systems Technology

This course covers the basics of how to site, design, and install photovoltaic [PV] systems. Topics include shading, the orientation of arrays, sizing for grid-connected and off-grid systems, design of systems for a given electrical load, safety practices for installers and the requirements of the National Electrical Code [NEC.] A PV system will be assembled and installed in class. This course can serve as a pre-requisite for the North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners [NABCEP.] Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

ELC-201 AC-Circuit Analysis

This course introduces sinusoidal inputs and time response of RL, RC, and RLC circuits. Network theorems for AC-circuits are covered, as well as resonance, filters, and pulse response of reactive circuits. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

ELC-101

ELC-203 Electronics I

This course is an introduction to the fundamental concepts and applications of solid-state devices. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Corequisites

ELC-201

ELC-204 Electronics II

This course is the second course in a two-course sequence in electronics. It builds upon the first course with a study of solid-state voltage and power amplifiers, emitter followers, field-effect transistors and circuits, thyristors, frequency effects, and op-amps. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

ELC-203

ELC-214 Communication Systems I

This course emphasizes the application of electronic communication theory to practical systems. This first course of a two-course sequence covers AM and FM systems, television, and telephone. Digital and data communication will be introduced, and continued in Communication Systems II. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Corequisites

ELC-204

ELC-215 Communication Systems II

This course follows the first course in this sequence, continuing work in digital and data communication, and then covers transmission lines, radio wave propagation, antennas, microwave systems, satellite communications, fiber-optic systems, and cellular communication systems. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

ELC-214

ELC-292 Co-Op Work Experience [Electronics]

This course provides the student with practical, supervised work experience in the field of electronic engineering technology. Through on-the-job experience, students can acquire valuable practical knowledge and skills to pursue a related career. Students are supervised by a faculty member and job placement assistance is available through the Co-Op Office. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [8.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

ELC-214

FAB-101 Introduction to Fashion Systems

This course provides students an overview of the multifaceted, global fashion industry, including sourcing, production, sustainability, wholesale and retail, marketing, calendar and technology. Students will also be introduced to major fashion milestones with a focus on the 19th through 21st centuries. Lecture [3.00]

Credits

3

FAB-102 Textile Science and Construction

This course is an introduction to textile science, including natural and synthetic fiber sourcing, and the variety of construction techniques. Emphasis is placed on identifying and evaluating fiber and fabric construction characteristics, correct use of terminology and determining appropriate uses in the design and construction of garments. Lecture [3.00] 1

Credits

3

Prerequisites

FAB-101

FAB-110 Sewing Techniques I

This course teaches the fundamentals of professional sewing and apparel construction techniques. Students learn basic cutting, sewing and finishing by hand and by machine. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00]

Credits

3

FAB-112 Flat Pattern Design I

This course focuses on garment design through flat pattern manipulation, including basic slash and spread, and pivot methods of design development. Students use the basic slopers to create original designs. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00]

Credits

3

Prerequisites

FAB-110

Corequisites

FAB-113

FAB-113 Draping I

This course focuses on garment design through draping on a dress form using muslin. Students learn the basics of grain, line and silhouette to create their own designs. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00]

Credits

3

Prerequisites

FAB-110

Corequisites

FAB-112

FAB-200 Fundamentals of Fashion Sketching and Presentation

This course covers basic principles and elements of fashion design with a focus on line, color, form, space, and texture. Basic body types and sketching techniques are emphasized. Students will apply the knowledge learned in Life Drawing 1 and Introduction to Fashion Systems to create fashion sketch presentations. Students will learn basic fashion proportions; develop a library of fashion croquis, basic rendering techniques for various fabrics and textures, flat technical sketching skills and presentation techniques. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00]

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART-123, ART-197, FAB-101

FAB-210 Sewing Techniques II

This course builds on Sewing Techniques 1, providing students with more advanced construction and finishing techniques, including sleeve insertion, pockets and closures. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00]

Credits

3

Prerequisites

FAB-110

Corequisites

FAB-112 & FAB-113

FAB-212 Flat Pattern Design II

This course builds on FAB-112, providing students with more advanced flat patternmaking techniques. Students develop sloper variations including the two-piece sleeve, jacket and pleated pant slopers. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00]

Credits

3

Prerequisites

FAB-112

Corequisites

FAB-113

FAB-213 Draping II

This course builds on FAB-113, providing students with more advanced draping techniques. Students develop design variations including the two=piece sleeve, jacket and pleated pant designs. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00]

Credits

3

Prerequisites

FAB-113

Corequisites

FAB-212

FAB-230 Trend Analysis and Product Development

This course enables students to understand, analyze and forecast fashion trends in order to successfully develop products from concept to consumer, with focus on sustainability. Students examine the fashion merchandising and marketing process, including product, price, place and promotion. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00]

Credits

3

Prerequisites

FAB-102

FAB-231 Tech Packs: Digital Flats and Specs

This course teaches students how to develop "tech packs" and garment specification sheets using manual and digital techniques such as flat garment measurement to communicate style development. An emphasis is placed on the accurate collection and communication of data for the development of first patterns, fittings, grading and production. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00]

Credits

3

Prerequisites

FAB-230

Corequisites

ART-107

FAB-250 Design Capstone/E-Portfolio

This course integrates all previous coursework into a final capstone project. Students will design and present two completed garments as part of a final 10-piece women's apparel collection based on current trends, including the technical specifications needed for production. In addition, students will prepare an e-portfolio of their collection. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00]

Credits

4

Prerequisites

FAB-112, FAB-213, FAB-230

Corequisites

ART-197, FAB-231

FIR-101 Introduction to Fire Protection

This course is an introduction to the field of fire science, and such will provide an overview of fire protection, fire prevention, fire suppression and the scientific nature of fire. Students will learn the principles relevant to hazard control, structural design, fire detection, extinguishment, and limitation of loss. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

FIR-102 Fundamentals of Fire Prevention and Inspection I

This course is an introduction to the study of the basic principles of fire prevention and inspection. Students will learn to utilize the tools necessary to perform inspections, properly make citations, and oversee corrective action. Emphasis of the course is to develop competency in basic fire code enforcement through proficient use of the New Jersey Uniform Fire Code and referenced standards. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

FIR-103 Building Codes and Standards

This course covers the basic principles of building codes and standards. The focus of the course is the nexus between building construction and design, and contemporary problems faced by fire organizations. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

FIR-104 Fire Tactics and Strategy

This course provides an in-depth analysis of the principles of fire control through utilization of personnel, equipment, and extinguishing agents on the fire ground. Emphasis is on pre-fire planning, fire ground problem solving, and decision-making in support of tactical deployment and strategic use of available resources. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

FIR-105 Fire Administration

This course is an introduction to organization and management of fire departments. The course will cover basic managerial concepts and principles of organizational structure, management, and supervisory techniques utilized in the fire service. The focus of the course will be on the company officer. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

GAM-110 Introduction Game Architecture and Design

This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of game architecture and design through critique of game play, interactive assignments, and culminating with the creation of an original game design document. Game design concepts include storytelling and narrative, game worlds and settings, game play, character development, audio, game art, level design and the user interface. Also covered are video game history, status of the game development industry and associated careers and the game development process. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

GAM-211 Game Development 2D

This course allows students to continue to develop their game programming knowledge and skills by planning, designing, implementing and testing complete games. Student knowledge of 2D scripting languages will be expanded to include high score storage techniques, timers, physics, player inputs and additional GUI controls and components. Topics for a 2D game engine include tile maps, more particle effects, camera management, inventory management, game state, and artificial intelligence. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

GAM-111

GAM-218 Game Development 3D I

This course provides the student with game programming knowledge and skills required for making 3D games. A professional game development platform will be investigated along with object-oriented programming concepts that include arrays, classes, properties, delegates, interfaces, and event handling. Students will also learn techniques for using a platform-integrated game engineto create game levels using terrain, material, object, and other level editing tools. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

INF-103

GAM-230 Game Programming 3D II

This course provides the student with game programming knowledge and skills required for making 3D games. A professional game development platform will be investigated along with object-oriented programming concepts that include arrays, classes, properties, delegates, interfaces, and event handling. Students will also learn techniques for using a platform-integrated game engineto create game levels using terrain, material, object, and other level editing tools. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

GAM-218

GEO-101 World Geography

This course is a detailed study of topography, land usage, and natural resources as they directly and indirectly affect human, economic, historical and political interaction. >General Education Course. >Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

GEO-102 Human Geography

This course is an introduction to the spatial patterning of human activities and the role of human affairs. This course explores some of the main issues in human/cultural geography including: economic development, industrialization, population distribution, organization of urban and non-urban societies, agriculture, nationalism, meaning of new spaces, and cultural expressions inorder to better understand the contemporary world. In addition, the class provides an introduction to various concepts and techniques used by geographers. >General Education Course. >Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

HIS-101 West Civilization to the Reformation

This course is a study of the Western world from ancient times to the Renaissance and Reformation. Major cultural, social, economic, political, and religious developments in the history of the West are surveyed. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

HIS-102 West Civilization since the Reformation

This course is a study of the Western world from the sixteenth century to the contemporary period. Major cultural, social, economic, political, and religious developments in modern Western history are surveyed. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

HIS-105 Women in History

This course is a study of women's roles from the classical age to the present. Various past societies are examined to determine their attitudes towards women as well as the causes and consequences of these attitudes. Particular attention is placed on studying women's roles in 19th and 20th century Europe and America. >General Education Course. > Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

HIS-106 Modern Europe to the French Revolution

This course is an analysis of western European history from the late Middle Ages to 1815. The course provides an overview of the major political, economic, and cultural developments which molded early modern Europe and culminates with an intensive examination of the French Revolution and the Napoleonic era. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

HIS-107 Modern Europe since the French Revolution

This course is an analysis of western European history from 1815 to present. The course provides an overview of the major political, economic, and cultural developments which characterize modern Europe and concludes with a comparative study of postwar Europe and America. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

HIS-111 US History to the Reconstruction

This course is a survey of the history of America from the colonial era to the Civil War and Reconstruction period. Emphasis is placed on the origins of American political system and on the social, cultural, economic, and diplomatic development of the United States. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

HIS-112 US History since the Reconstruction

This course is a survey of the history of the United States from the Reconstruction period to the present. Emphasis is placed on the American political system and on the social, economic, and diplomatic development of the United States. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

HIS-113 20th Century US History to WWII

This course is a study of the United States from the beginning of the 20th Century through the New Deal Era of the 1930's. Topics covered include Industrialism, Progressivism, the Great Depression, the New Deal, United States involvement in world affairs, World War I, and the political, social, economic, and cultural development of the United States during this period. >GeneralEducation Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

HIS-114 20th Century US History since WWII

This course is a study of the United States from the Second World War to the present. Topics covered include World War II diplomacy, the Cold War, containment, the Vietnam era, d195169tente, domestic reforms including Civil Rights, and the Great Society, Watergate, and other political, social, economic, and cultural developments in the United States from the 1940's to the present. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

HIS-116 Women in American History

This course is a survey of the history of women from the colonial period to the present. Feminism, women's suffrage, and the advocacy of social and economic equality are the unifying themes of the course. >General Education Course. >Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

HIS-121 Modern Asian History

This course is a study of modern China, India, and Japan. The course focuses on these societies' traditional cultures and world views and on the alterations and disruptions in these societies as a result of the introduction of Western values and ideas in the 19th and 20th centuries. >General Education Course. >Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

HIS-124 African American History [1877-Present]

The content of this course spans from the end of the Reconstruction Era to the present day. Its aim is to write into the historical discourse of all Americans the contributions of African Americans which shaped this country through their distinctive struggles and experiences. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

HIS-126 Modern African History

This course is a survey of African History from 1750 to the present. Emphasis is placed on the impact of slavery and western imperialism, the emergence of the new African states since the Second World War, and the social, cultural, political, and economic development of Africa. >General Education Course. >Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

HIS-130 Latin American History to the Independence

This course is a study of the European and Indian heritage of Latin American civilization. The course examines the development of colonial culture, with special emphasis on its government and economy, and concludes with an analysis of the wars of independence. >General Education Course. >Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

HIS-131 Latin American History since the Independence

This course is a study of Latin America since 1850. The course analyzes the development of the region's principal countries: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, and Mexico. Regionalism, cultural development, the impact of American and world politics, dictatorships, land reforms, and constitutional issues relative to these countries are considered. >General Education Course. >Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

HIS-132 The Spanish Speaking Caribbean and Central America since 1898

This course is a study of the Spanish Speaking Caribbean and Central America since 1898. The course analyzes the development of the region's principal countries, including Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Guatemala, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama. Cultural development, the impact of the United States and Cold War politics, dictatorships, land reforms and constitutional issues relative to these countries are considered. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

HIS-135 History of the Middle East

This course analyzes the rise of Islam with an emphasis on its cultural, intellectual, and scientific contributions to Middle Eastern civilization. Islam is examined as a religion, as a vast imperial political system, and as an advanced culture. Special attention is given to current Mideast conflicts and to the role of the United Nations in the region. International confrontation and collaboration in the region is examined. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

HIS-144 Contemporary American Issues and Problems

This course is a study in a historical context of selected political, social, economic, and diplomatic issues and problems facing the United States in the contemporary world. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

HIS-145 Anatomy of Peace

This course is a study in a historical context of peace and war, particularly in the 20th century. Topics considered include diplomacy and peacemaking, arms control, world organizations, nonviolence, conflict, and conflict resolution. Relevant ethical, economic, biological, social, political, and psychological issues are examined. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

HIS-146 Genocide and Holocaust

This course is an introduction to the history of 20th and 21st century genocide and violent conflict. Areas of focus include the Armenian, Ukrainian, Cambodian, Rwandan, Bosnian, and Darfurian genocides with special attention given to the Holocaust (Shoah). The course approaches these genocides as products of distinct historical contexts and changing international responses while developing a generic model for recognizing genocide drawn from historiographical debates. Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00]

Credits

3

HIS-195 Vietnam

This partially online course is a 13-hour television course on the history of American and French involvement in Indochina. Interviews with major figures and ordinary individuals are interspersed with the film footage from a dozen countries [including France and Vietnam] as well as from US news and government archives. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

HIS-201 American Civil War and Reconstruction Era, 1845-1877

This course explores the causes, course, and consequence of the Civil War Era. Broad political, social, military, and economics aspects of this period will be covered. Substantial attention will also be paid to the challenges and failures of Reconstruction. Students will learn historical facts and interpretation while building on their understanding of the broad scope of history as a discipline. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

HIS-291 Co-Op Work Experience [History]

This course offers students an opportunity for supervised work in the field of history. Job assistance is available through the Co-Op Office. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [3.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

1 course from HIS

HIS-292 Co-Op Work Experience [History]

This course offers students an opportunity for supervised work in the field of history. Job assistance is available through the Co-Op Office. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [8.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

1 course from HIS

HIS-293 Co-Op Work Experience [History]

This course offers students an opportunity for supervised work in the field of history. Job assistance is available through the Co-Op Office. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [12.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

1 course from HIS

HRM-101 Introduction to Hospitality Management

This course is a study of the fundamental principles of hotel, restaurant, and food service operations. Basic managerial and operating functions prevalent in the industry are considered in conjunction with the various job opportunities available. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

HRM-102 Food Protection and Safety

This course introduces the principles involved in identification and prevention of food contamination; the role of state, federal and local Public Health regulations; accident prevention; and the safety practices and control measures used in the various food service operations. Students will take the FDA Food Protection Certification exam as part of the course. Lecture [2.00],Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

HRM-103 Professional Food Preparation Techniques

This course is the study of the techniques used in the preparation of such basic foods as vegetables, potatoes, eggs, fish, shellfish, and meats. Theories of grilling, frying, broiling, and saut?ing, as well as demonstrations, lectures, and laboratory work on meat cuts and their utilization are included in the course Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [4.00].

Credits

3

HRM-104 Front Office Procedures

This course is a study of the principles of the organization and operation of public lodging facilities. Front office management and procedures covering duties of the manager, assistant manager, room clerk, night auditor, and cashier are discussed. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

2

HRM-106 Menu Planning and Nutrition

This course is a study of the principles of menu planning for a variety of food service operations. The preparation of balanced menus to meet differing nutritional needs, the human digestive system, the importance of food and diet to health, and the values of nutrients and calories in maintaining good health are some of the subjects covered in the course Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

HRM-108 Computer Applications for the Hospitality Industry

This course introduces students to computerized recording, forecasting and other analytical procedures used by management to control food and beverage costs. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

HRM-110 Introduction to Baking

This course is a study of the basic theory of baking and the skill of producing baked products. The content of the course includes types of flour, leavening agents, scaling, and icings. Hands-on baking in a laboratory setting includes the production of breads, cakes, pastries, and cookies. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

HRM-129 Event Planning and Management I

Event Planning and Management I will provide the information and tools needed to meet the needs and expectations of participants of meeting and event participants in an ever-changing profession and conceptual age, with content relevant to the required daily activities and decisions Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Cross Listed Courses

BUS-129

HRM-201 Food and Beverage Cost Control

This course is a detailed study of the cost control procedures found within the hospitality industry. The content of the course includes the factors affecting purchasing, storage, issuing, receiving, and preparation. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

HRM-101

HRM-202 Quantity Food Production and Services [Fall Only]

This course concentrates upon the student operation of a cafeteria-type food service facility under an instructor's supervision and includes the preparation and service of various menu items. Students experience all phases of an institutional food service operation through rotation laboratory assignments. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [4.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HRM-103

HRM-203 Beverage Management

This course is a study of the history, sources, production, uses, control, and legislation pertaining to alcoholic beverages. Bartending skills and mixology in hands-on laboratory settings are studied. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

HRM-101

HRM-204 Food Purchasing

This course is the study of the types and kinds of meat, poultry, fish, shellfish, fruits and vegetables. An analysis of specifications and techniques in purchasing fresh, frozen, and canned products from commercial purveyors are presented. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

HRM-101

HRM-205 Restaurant Service Management

This course introduces the principles and techniques of waiting tables and doing table setups, and the course includes an analysis of the service management responsibilities associated with the operation of restaurants. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HRM-101

HRM-206 Commercial Restaurant Operation [Spring Only]

This course concentrates upon the preparation and service of complete menus by students under the direction of program instructors. Students participate fully in the management and operation of a full-service formal restaurant. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [4.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HRM-202

HRM-207 Hotel Sales and Convention Planning

This course is a study of the principles and techniques of group sales in the lodging industry. Topics of discussion include feasibility studies, advertising procedures, market development, identification of selling objectives, maximizing room occupancy, long term sales planning, and convention operations. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

HRM-101

HRM-212 International Cuisine

This course is a study of the recipes for the preparation of foods from various countries around the world. French, Italian, German, Chinese, Japanese, Mexican, and American cuisine are considered. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HRM-103

HRM-213 Classical Garde-Manger [Fall Only]

This course is a study of a wide variety of food decorating and garnishing techniques. Laboratory work includes fruit and vegetable decoration and the preparation of aspic, chaud, froid, hors d'oeuvre, and gelatin. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HRM-103

HRM-214 Banquet and Catering Management

This course introduces students to the skills necessary to be qualified, competent and creative food service specialists. Lecture [2.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

HRM-101

HRM-217 Issues in the Hospitality Industry

This course includes the evaluation of selected food service units; a discussion of current concerns and issues common to all food services; and contemporary trends in the application of advanced technology, menu implementation strategies, marketing strategies, beverage management, and personnel management. Lecture [2.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

HRM-101

HRM-219 Hospitality Law

This course provides industry specific legal fundamentals to students and practicing professionals in the hospitality industry. It introduces basic foundations and principles of the law affecting the hospitality industry and introduces guidelines and techniques that show managers how to manage preventively and apply a practical legal awareness to their actions. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HRM-101

Cross Listed Courses

LGL-219

HRM-220 Advanced Baking Techniques

This course continues the theory of baking and the skill of producing baked products. Laboratory work includes elaborate cake and pastry making, showpiece desserts, and delicate marzipan, sugar and chocolate presentations. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HRM-110

HRM-229 Event Planning and Management II

This course will provide the information and tools needed to meet the needs and expectations of participants of meeting and event participants in an ever-changing profession and conceptual age, with content relevant to the required daily activities and decisions. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HRM-129 or BUS-129

Cross Listed Courses

BUS-229

HRM-292 Co-Op Work Experience [Hotel/Restaurant/Hospitality]

This course requires part-time employment by the student in a college-approved business organization to help the student gain insight into marketing and administrative practices of the industry. This paid work experience is supervised and coordinated by a faculty member. Hospitality industry related jobs are required and must be approved by a faculty coordinator. Job assistanceis available through the Co-Op Office. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [12.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

HRM-101

HRT-101 Fundamentals of Horticulture

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the multifaceted field of ornamental horticulture. Topics for examination include the historical role of horticulture from the artistic and scientific perspectives, as well as its commercial and aesthetic significance and applications for the future. Discussion of current employment opportunities, trends and practices will beemphasized. Noted guest lecturers from all fields of horticulture will share their views and experiences. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

3

HRT-102 Plant Science

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the horticultural relationship of plants to botanical anatomy and function, including the limiting factors that influence plant growth such as light, temperature, water and nutrients. The characteristics of soils, soil nutrient deficiencies, fertilizers and soil amendments, as well as their relationship to plant growth willbe covered. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

HRT-103 Turf and Grounds Management

This course is the study of turf and plant practices on the residential and commercial sites. Emphasis is placed on the structure and growth habits of commonly used species and cultivars including installation, renovation and maintenance practices. Exposure to grounds maintenance equipment commonly utilized in the installation and maintenance of the landscape is included. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

3

HRT-104 Landscape Plants and Materials I

This course is an introduction to the basic genera of the most commonly utilized trees, shrubs and ground covers in the landscape. In addition to identification, growth form, color, texture and habitat requirements, and their uses in the residential and commercial sites will be studied. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

2

HRT-112 Pests and the Ornamental Plant

This course introduces the student to the insects, diseases, and environmental disorders that affect plants. Identification of pests and methods of controlling them are emphasized. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

HRT-113 Principles of Landscaping

This course is a study of the design and development of landscape plans from plot plans and site analysis studies. Instruction in drafting and mechanical skills is included. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HRT-104

Corequisites

HRT-104

HRT-114 Computer Applications for Landscape Design

This course will introduce students to the Computer Aided Design [CAD] and quotation software used by professionals in the green industry. The course's focus is on learning to use industry standard computer software such as Dynascape to develop landscape design projects. Students should be familiar with basic computer functions before enrolling. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

HRT-115 Floral Design

This course is a study of the plants, supplies, and design skills used in flower arranging. Laboratory experiences include seasonal and non-seasonal arrangements for a variety of occasions. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

3

HRT-119 Greenhouse Operations and Production

This course is a study of the management practices of field and greenhouse production of foliage and floral crops. Emphasis is placed on the commercial practices of purchasing, programming, cultural production, storage, handling, and sales of cut flowers and potted plant crops. The chain-of-life concept is discussed as it relates to the consumer's aesthetic use of cut flowers and plants. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

3

HRT-120 Interior Plantscaping

This course acquaints the student with interior plant materials, with emphasis on their cultural requirements, maintenance practices and key ornamental aspects. Basic business applications regarding installation and maintenance contracts are covered. Emphasis will be placed on selection of appropriate plants in environments calling for a balance of human needs and plant culture.Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

HRT-124 Irrigation Technology

This is a course designed to expose students to landscape and turf equipment technology, system designs, installation and maintenance of a variety of irrigation types. Students will be involved with reading irrigation blueprints, troubleshooting potential problems and repair techniques. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

2

HRT-125 Equipment Management

This course introduces the student to the selection, proper use, maintenance and repair of power tools that are used in the lawn and tree care industries. Lecture topics will focus on the necessary information needed to make purchasing decisions as well as safety and proper use practices. The lab section provides the student with a hands-on approach to troubleshooting engine problems and a variety of repair options. Students will be required to present projects relating to their industry's equipment needs. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

2

HRT-130 Landscape Contracting

This course is a study of the basic requirements for developing landscape contracts and the writing of detailed specifications. Ethical practices and professional relationships among the client, consultant, contractor, other allied professions, and employees are also studied. Project costs and fee determination procedures are represented and simulated in the labs. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

HRT-204 Landscape Graphics

This course emphasizes the techniques for formulating, presenting, and drafting landscape designs. In addition, the basic design elements of planting, including form, texture, color, sequence of bloom, and ecological associations will be studied. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

HRT-113

HRT-213 Sustainable Design and Construction

This course is a continuation of the advancement of the student's design skills and practices. This course will place special emphasis on the ecological association of the land and plants. Students will develop landscape plans utilizing green technology while addressing the environment and topographical concerns of a site. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HRT-113

HRT-214 Landscape Design and Building Capstone

This course will continue improving the student's design skills with a series of group projects using a variety of sites. Students will polish their presentation skills while solving problems and business management issues of increasing complexity. Off-campus visitations to design/build facilities and project sites will offer students additional insight into the day-to-day experience of working in the green industry. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HRT-213

HRT-215 Landscape Design and Building Management

This course brings together the student's knowledge of both horticulture and business. Students will take a residential design and a project of their own choosing from start to finish, combining design with construction. Emphasis is on design and construction details, estimating, specifications, and contract documents. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00]. 3

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HRT-213

HRT-232 Plant Propagation

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the techniques, facilities and materials needed for plant propagation in the greenhouse. Techniques of both vegetative and sexual reproduction of herbaceous and woody plants, as well as greenhouse crops and crops for the interior landscape are covered. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

HRT-102

HRT-233 Landscape Plants and Materials II

This course places emphasis on the identification, culture and use of both native and cultivated herbaceous materials used in the landscape and further continues with the identification and use of more specialized and unique woody plant materials. Laboratory and field exercises include studies and demonstrations of their applications and uses in both natural and designed settings. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

HRT-104

HRT-234 Commercial Floral Design Management

This course introduces the student to the production methods encountered in a commercial floral operation. Flower selection, basic and specialized supplies and their uses in all phases of the commercial operation will be discussed and demonstrated. In addition to designs of special occasion arrangements, students will be exposed to various marketing aspects of the floral industry including purchasing, sales and profitability. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

HRT-115

HRT-235 Landscape Analysis

This course acquaints the student with the different sites encountered by the landscape contractor, emphasizing appropriate planning in the development of both residential and commercial properties. Construction considerations will include drainage, irrigation, structures and the selection of materials. The integration of site analysis and construction materials in student projects will be stressed. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HRT-104

HRT-236 Horticulture Marketing and Sales

This course introduces the student to concepts relating to preparation for a career in horticulture. Field studies into horticultural businesses, group discussions and consultations with industry professionals assist in formulating effective strategies and planning for a profitable business. Included are discussions of basic principles of marketing, current industry trends and sales. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HRT-101

HRT-237 Arboriculture and Plant Healthcare

This course is the study of the care of trees and woody plants. Emphasis is placed on pruning, pest control and proper cultural practices including planting procedures and fertilization schedules. Other important topics to be covered are the safety practices involved with tree climbing, pesticide application, and tree removal. The course will provide an understanding of the basic functions of woody plant systems. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

3

HRT-292 Co-Op Work Experience [Horticulture]

This course is a supervised work experience program which includes paid employment at an approved horticultural establishment and attendance at a weekly seminar. The course is designed to provide students with opportunities to learn and to practice skills under professional guidance. The area of placement will depend upon the student?s background and interests. Job assistance isavailable through the Co-Op Office. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [11.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

1 course from HRT

HSC-100 Cross Cultural Healthcare

This course will examine the impact of an increasingly diverse population on the healthcare system. Students will develop an understanding for diversity as a concept that includes many different types of racial, ethnic, religious, and socioeconomic categories. Case studies and discussions will provide students with opportunities to understand and acquire "cultural competence" for implementation in healthcare settings, and the impact it can have on quality of care and organization management. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

HSC-101 Introduction to Healthcare Administration

This course is designed to introduce the student to health care delivery systems around the world and to apply management principles to the medical industry. Topics covered in this course are health care delivery systems, finance, management models, collective bargaining, budgets, marketing strategies, and leadership. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Cross Listed Courses

BUS-111

HSC-102 Healthcare Ethics and Law

This is a survey course dedicated to the analysis and application of Healthcare Ethics and Law. Emphasis is placed on analysis of the legal and healthcare environment and its relationship to medical ethics. Students will examine case studies and will learn to identify and respond to legal and ethical issues. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Cross Listed Courses

LGL-104

HSC-200 Community Health

This course will provide students with an opportunity to gain knowledge of public health issues and initiatives. Students will also focus on local, state, and federal health resources for health promotion and disease prevention. The course will serve as the capstone integrating concepts studied throughout the Health Science degree program. Lecture [3.00]. ]

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HSC-100 and [HSC-101 or BUS-111] and [HSC-102 or LGL-104]

HSE-101 Introduction to Homeland Security

This course focuses on a comprehensive, up-to-date overview of homeland security, from an all-hazards perspective. Students examine threats to homeland security, including natural and technological disasters, as well as intentional threats of domestic and international terrorism, including weapons of mass destruction. Students review the roles and responsibilities of governmentagencies, non-government organizations, and individual citizens in homeland security. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

HSE-102 Introduction to Emergency Management

This course offers an in depth analysis of planning and administration of Emergency Management. The course addresses natural and manmade disasters, FEMA and state agencies, OSHA, National Incident Management System [NIMS,] Incident Command procedure, National Response Plan and safety in the working environment. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

HSE-103 Legal Aspects of Homeland Security and Emergency Management

This course is an introduction to the legal and policy framework for emergency management and response to natural and technological hazards and disasters. The course addresses the role of local, state, and federal governments in an emergency or disaster response. The duty to act, liability and negligence, the use of volunteer resources and the role of counsel in emergency management is examined. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

HSE-104 Disaster Management, Risk Assessment, and Mitigation

This course covers the basic principles of disaster management due to natural or manmade events, the identification, and assessment and monitoring of risks and the mitigation of risks using available technological, human, and organizational resources. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

INF-101 Introduction to Information Technology

This course examines computing tools, processes, and applications and their appropriate use in society. Topics include hardware, software, the Internet and web, communications and networking, and the effective use of related tools. Labs will provide hands-on activities relating to the course content. Students will work in an online learning system. >General Education Course.Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

INF-102 Introduction to Computing

This course introduces computing hardware, software, applications, and their appropriate use. Topics include purchasing a computer, securing and maintaining a home computer, and setting up a wireless home router. Labs will provide hands-on activities relating to the course content and will include use of productivity software. Laboratory [2.00]. >General Education Course.

Credits

1

INF-103 Introduction to Programming (Python)

This course introduces computer programming using a hands-on approach. Topics explored include programming logic, data types, input and output of data, computations, control structures, modular design, object-oriented concepts, and quality assurance. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00]

Credits

3

INF-107 Mini Computer Operations

This course prepares the student to use the IBM AS/400 System. Topics include database concepts, display files control language commands, and source entry utility. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

INF-108 PC Maintenance

This course provides instruction in the infrastructure, configuration, upgrade, troubleshooting and repair of PC systems. Students will partially assemble and upgrade a PC. Topics include diagnosing problems; preventive maintenance; safety and environmental issues; motherboards [components and architecture]; computer memory; input/output [I/O] interfaces; printer classes; basicnetworking and data communications concepts and components. This course assists with preparation for the CompTIA A+ Certification. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

INF-114 Microsoft Office [Office 2016]

This course uses project based exercises to teach the fundamentals of the Microsoft Office Suite - specifically, Word [word processing], Excel [spreadsheet], Access [database], PowerPoint [presentation], and Outlook [e-mail and calendar]. Labs will include exposure to web development using the suite. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

INF-115 Desktop Publishing [Publisher 2016]

This course is a hands-on experience integrating text and graphics to design, edit, and produce a variety of business documents. Knowledge of word processing is helpful. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

INF-119 Document Processing [Word 2016]

This course uses project-based exercises to teach document production using word processing software. The touch typing method of keyboarding is introduced and used to aid productivity. Labs will provide hands-on activities relating to the course content. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

INF-120 PowerPoint [PowerPoint 2016]

This course is an introduction to electronic presentations. Students will learn to create professional-looking, computer-generated presentations that include use of design templates, graphics, sounds, animations, OLE and web links. Students will work in outline and slide views. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

INF-124 Spreadsheet Excel [Excel 2016]

This course is a hands-on experience of a state-of-the-art electronic spreadsheet. The course will provide step-by-step instruction in the various commands necessary for spreadsheet creation and the manipulation and management of spreadsheets. All lab work is done on a Microsoft Windows processing platform. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

INF-130 Testing and Quality Assurance

This course introduces methodologies associated with quality assurance testing. Students will learn about the role of testing in the software development life cycle and will develop systematic approaches to facilitate thorough testing. Issues specific to multi-platform environments will be investigated. Students will document their testing procedure and results using both verbaland written communication methods. The relationship between testing, product marketing, and customer service will be explored. Projects may include testing for game programming. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

INF-140 Introduction to Multimedia

This course introduces the student to the various applications of computer-based multimedia in industry, government, education, and entertainment. Hardware systems, distribution media, flowcharts, software tools, scripts, and production will be covered. Students will work in groups to design and prepare a multimedia presentation. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Cross Listed Courses

COM-140

INF-143 Web Publishing

This course introduces the student to the principles involved in creating dynamic web sites. Students learn to use a variety of tools to make compelling and informative web s applying current web productivity software. Exercises are given that allow students to design, develop and upload their web s onto the Internet without web-based programming. Web site management strategy is also discussed. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

INF-144 Windows Desktop Operations [Vista]

This course introduces the student to the basics of the Microsoft Windows desktop. Topics presented include working with files, organizing files with Windows Explorer, personalizing your Windows environment, bringing the Web to the desktop, searching for information, working with graphics, object linking and embedding, exploring your network, working with hardware, and managingWindows. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

INF-146 Web Development

This course provides instruction in the development and composition of Web s. Students will author s that meet current professional standards as specified by the World Wide Web consortium. They will write HTML and CSS using a text editor and will be introduced to web authoring productivity software. Objects such as graphics and sound, style sheets, JavaScript, and issues surrounding cross-platform viewing will be discussed. The students will develop and publish a completed Web site. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00]

Credits

3

Corequisites

Recommended: INF-101 [To be successful in this course, students should adhere to the recommendation.]

INF-147 Web Development using Dreamweaver

This course introduces students to Web authoring using a What-You-See-Is-What-You-Get editing environment. This course will focus on technical mastery of the software tools and techniques used to create Web s with Dreamweaver, and on an understanding of the technical and environmental issues that affect Web design, performance, and effectiveness. Graphic design issues will be addressed in this context. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

INF-150 Business Programming Logic

This course develops and reinforces the student's logical thought processes using proper design techniques and tools, especially flowcharting. Topics presented include exploration of business programming considerations, such as input of data, output of information, accuracy and reliability, the use of objects and object-oriented programming, as well as data structures. Topics under data structures include linked-lists, hyperlinking, stacks, queues, trees, and traditional file structures. Lecture [2. 00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

MAT-040 or MAT-048

INF-151 Database: Access [Access 2016]

This course is a hands-on experience of a relational database management system. The course entails developing database management projects starting with the design of the structure of a database, entering and editing data, designing multi-table queries, and creating forms and reports. Various techniques of database applications development will be implemented. All work will bedone on a Microsoft Windows processing platform. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

INF-160 Networking Technologies and Data Communications

This course offers comprehensive coverage of networking and data transmission key terms, concepts, and development strategies. Topics presented include: the history of network development; network media; network protocols; network/data transmission theory [OSI layers and IEEE standards]; network types; network design; server/client configuration; network administration; networkremote access; wide area networks; and network troubleshooting. The course assists in preparing the student for the MCSE certification exams offered by Microsoft and the Foundations Level CIW certification. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

INF-161 Internet Research and Data Handling

This course provides an in-depth view of the Internet and is designed to meet both professional and research needs. Topics covered include advanced searching strategies and techniques, data mining, information integrity and intellectual property, FTP sites, downloads, file types and their integration into applications, and connectivity issues. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

INF-162 Introduction to the Internet

This course introduces the necessary skills to access the Internet using leading Internet browsers. Topics covered include the Web, its components and organization; URLs; browsing Web s; Web management techniques; saving and printing; fundamental techniques for searching using various search engines; sending and receiving electronic mail; mail management techniques; reading andposting newsgroup articles, conversing and chatting; and popular Web sites. Course credit by exam is available. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

INF-163 Internet Concepts and Applications

This course provides comprehensive coverage of the Internet. Topics presented include the Internet's history; its composition and technologies; protocols; electronic mail systems; browser and Web concepts; source integrity; searching the Web for research and gaining market intelligence; commanding FTP, newsgroups, gopher, and Telnet; and objects, plug-ins and viewers. This course assists in preparation for Foundations Level CIW certification. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

INF-164 Networking Fundamentals I

This course exposes students to the skills needed to design, build, and maintain small to medium-sized networks. Students are provided with classroom and laboratory experience in current and emerging networking technology. Focus is on the theory behind LANs. Topics include safety, networking, network terminology and protocols, network standards, LANs, WANs, OSI models, cabling,cabling tools, routers, router programming, Ethernet, Internet Protocol addressing, network standards, safety and environment issues. This course assists in preparation towards the CISCO CCNA certification. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

None; Helpful: A+ Certification; Microsoft Office Skills; introductory programming or multimedia courses; introductory electronics

INF-165 Introduction to Linux

This course provides a hands-on introduction to this open-source operating system. Students learn to configure a graphical desktop environment, install and configure office-suite applications, create a Linux server environment, configure basic services, and use Linux commands. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

INF-170 Networking Experience

This course awards transfer credit, based upon proven extensive professional experience in Network Administration or completion of sufficient networking coursework, to students wishing to enter the Network Security Certificate of Achievement. New students also may satisfy this requirement by enrolling in INF-160. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

INF-208 Systems Analysis and Design

This course addresses the effective use of equipment and management techniques in meeting the information needs of the contemporary business world. The techniques of analysis, specifications, selection, and implementation lead to the design of an optimal information system. A variety of hands-on tools will be used to complement the covered concepts. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00]. ]

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BUS-101, [INF-220 or INF-221 or INF-236]

INF-214 Administration Simulation

This course requires students to apply software products to perform general office functions. Students will prepare a variety of documents integrating multiple office software applications. Critical thinking and personal time management will be used to organize work and make effective decisions. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

INF-101, INF-114, INF-119

INF-217 Database for Applications [Oracle]

This course focuses on database design and implementation. Topics of discussion include database planning and development, normalization theory, creation of the conceptual model, conversion to the physical model, data entry and processing using SQL commands, and data integrity. Students will develop databases from specifications and demonstrate their utility by performing SQL data retrieval. Database Administration topics will be introduced. This course assists with preparation for the OCA exam. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

INF-101 or CIS-158 or CIS-165 or INF-220 or INF-221 or INF-236

INF-218 Database Programming [Oracle-PL/SQL]

This course covers the creation of database applications using a procedural language extension to SQL. Students learn some of the limitations of SQL and explore procedural logic constructs such as variables, constants, conditional statements, iterative controls, functions, and procedures. Students will use exception handlers to make their programs more robust. They will gain experience using, creating, and managing packages. The concepts will be explored using database software in a hands-on project-based environment. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

INF-217

INF-219 Database Administration

This course covers the installation, configuration, deployment and administration of database servers. Beyond basic installation and configuration issues, students will learn how to back up and recover data, administer users, transport data between databases, manage data, and configure networks for database access. These concepts and skills will be explored using database software in a hands-on project-based environment. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

INF-101

INF-220 Visual Basic Programming

This course provides effective hands-on instruction in an event-driven, high level programming language, using a series of tools to design and control object-oriented graphical user interfaces in an integrated development environment. Course content builds on the concepts presented in Introduction to Programming. All lab work is done on a Microsoft Windows processing platform. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

INF-103

INF-221 C/C++ Programming

This course provides the foundations for programming in the C and C++ languages. Students code programs applying C/C++ operators, constructs, and functions. Topics covered include language version differences, definition of variables; math, relational, and logical operators; decisions; while and for loops; C/C++ functions, user written functions, and scope and passing values. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

INF-103 Introduction to Programming

INF-224 Advanced C++ Programming

This course is a continuation of C/C++ Programming. Students code application programs in a complete object-oriented environment applying advanced concepts such as templates, inheritance, polymorphism, C style input/output streams, object-pointers, functions, the persistence of object, and attributes. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

INF-221

INF-228 Excel Problem Solving [Excel 2016]

This course focuses on the practical applications of Excel. Business applications will be analyzed and developed. Topics covered include creating and using macros, linking among worksheets and between files, importing and exporting, databases, graphics, advanced functions, and other advanced spreadsheet topics as needed to develop applications. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

INF-114 or INF-124

INF-230 Advanced Multimedia

This project-based course investigates selected areas of digital multimedia in depth. Students will work singly and in groups on hands-on projects that include subsets of the following: text as a visual design element, 2D bitmap and vector graphics, 3D modeling and animation, audio production, and video production. Open-source and commercial software tools will be used. Emphasiswill be on mastery of underlying technologies, processes, techniques, and standards to achieve efficiency and optimization. Some projects may also involve the use of scripting. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

INF-140

Corequisites

INF-150

INF-232 Windows Client

This course will introduce students to the current Microsoft Windows operating system through lectures, demonstrations, discussions, and hands-on lab exercises. Students learn about and use the various tools for administering and configuring Windows including the Microsoft Management Console, Task Scheduler, and the Control Panel. Students are instructed how to install and administer TCP/IP; install, share and administer print devices; and manage data storage. The course also assists in preparing to sit for the current Windows MCP exam. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

INF-101, INF-160

INF-236 Java Programming

This course provides effective hands-on instruction in the Java language, building upon the concepts presented in Introduction to Programming. Topics explored include Java syntax, data types, arrays, conditions, loops, methods, classes, and objects. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

INF-103

INF-237 Introduction to Business Expert Systems

This course is an overview of the concepts and business applications of expert systems. Topics presented include expert systems' characteristics, components of expert systems, and methods of knowledge acquisition. Emphasis is placed on business applications and implementation issues. One or more microcomputer-based expert system shells are demonstrated and used by students to create an expert system prototype[s] in the labs. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

INF-208

INF-239 Applications Development

This is a capstone course using the case study approach in the design and implementation of application software. Students design, code, test, and document contemporary computer application[s]. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00]. ]

Credits

3

Prerequisites

INF-217 and [INF-224 or INF-268 or INF-248 or INF-246]

INF-240 ClientSide Scripting using JavaScript

This course provides experience in building interactive and dynamic Web s. Topics taught include variables, data types, objects, operators, control structures, functions, cookies, and browser issues. Examples will include interactive forms and visual effects such as animation. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00]. ]

Credits

3

Prerequisites

INF-101, and [INF-141 or INF-146]

INF-246 Advanced Visual Basic Programming

This course continues effective hands-on instruction in the event-driven, high level programming language Visual Basic. Emphasis is on programming, using object-oriented graphical user interfaces in an integrated development environment. All work is done on a Microsoft Windows processing platform. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

INF-220

INF-248 ActiveX Control Development using Visual Basic

This course provides the Visual Basic programmer with effective hands-on instruction in developing ActiveX controls and programming them for Web applications and active documents. Topics presented in class include creating ActiveX clients, ActiveX code components and controls. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

[INF-161 or INF-162 or INF-163] and INF-246

INF-249 Visual C++ for Windows with MFC

This course provides the C++ programmer with effective hands-on instruction in developing Visual C++ applications using Microsoft Foundation Class Library [MFC]. This course introduces Windows programming concepts using Windows resource identifiers, dialog boxes, and controls. In addition, the course covers the use of Visual C++ for developing stand-alone interactive applications. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

INF-224

INF-251 Advanced Access [Access 2016]

This course will focus on using the more powerful features of Microsoft Access including the organization of multiple databases, advanced methods of query, programming, and data manipulation. All work will be done on a Microsoft Windows processing platform. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

INF-114 or INF-151

INF-252 Windows Server

This course introduces students to Microsoft Windows Server through lectures, demonstrations, discussions and hands-on labs. Students learn to install the current version of Windows Server, Active Directory, DHCP, DNS and also learn about the various file systems supported by Windows Server. Students use Microsoft Management Console, learn how to administer print services and install and administer network protocols and services. The course also assists in preparing to sit for the Windows Server MCP exam. [Completion of INF-232 is recommended before taking INF-252.] Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

INF-101, INF-160

INF-253 Technical Communications

This course employs computer-assisted methods for planning and presenting technical information in a clear and concise manner. Emphasis is placed on designing effective methods for determining the structure of oral, written, and graphic communications in a technical environment. Topics presented include preparation of end-user documentation; presenting technical information to non-technical individuals; reporting, extracting, charting, and summarizing data. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

INF-101

INF-254 Unix/Linux Network Administration

This course provides comprehensive coverage of the UNIX/Linux operating system. Topics covered include all key aspects of the operating system including installation procedures, command line usage, shell scripting and customization, commonly used tools and utilities, process control, Regular Expression [RE] pattern matching, and the X Windows system. The objective is to enable network administrators to effectively utilize the operating system and the tools it provides to automate their day-to-day activities. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

INF-160

INF-256 Topics in Networking

This course focuses on the latest advances in networking theory and administration. Students study topics that are of current relevance within this dynamic and fast-growing field. As the topics will change each semester, emphasis will be on identifying changes in networking standards and protocols; media, architecture and hardware; network security; shifts in vendor product andmarket share; and future technologies. Students are expected to use the Internet as a key fact-finding resource. Lecture [3.00]. ]

Credits

3

Prerequisites

INF-160 and [INF-161 or INF-162 or INF-163]

INF-257 Network Troubleshooting

This course establishes the methodologies and tools necessary to proactively troubleshoot computer networks. Topics covered include: methods for identification and repair strategies for network faults caused by user, hardware, and software problems; disaster recovery and backup plans; network management record keeping; configuration management; and patch/service release installation procedures. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

INF-232, INF-252

INF-258 TCP/IP

This course examines Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol [TCP/IP] concepts with emphasis on planning, deploying and managing a TCP/IP network. Topics include the configuration and logistics of TCP/IP networks; IP addressing and subnetting; Multicast IP; Mobile IP; IPv6; FTP and Remote Access Protocol [PPP and SLIP]. Students will learn how to troubleshoot and manageTCP/IP networks using a packet sniffer, TCP/IP utilities, and protocols such as Internet Control Message Protocol [ICMP]. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

INF-160

INF-260 Technical Support Operations

This course introduces students to both the methodological and hands-on customer service-related world of end user support. Course topics examined include understanding the support profession and models; customer service; mission statements and service level agreements; implementing a help desk; troubleshooting; procurement; outsourcing; evaluation measurements; help desk certification. Lab topics studied include application installation; software and virus troubleshooting; call tracking; remote support; and support documentation. Students complete an individual support project with documentation. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00]. ]

Credits

3

Prerequisites

INF-108, INF-144, and [INF-161 or INF-162 or INF-163]

INF-263 Advanced Web Development

This course investigates a broad spectrum of web tools and technologies that are required to build and maintain client and server sites on the Web. Both client-side and server-side technologies will be discussed including the deployment of web sites. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00]. ]

Credits

3

Prerequisites

INF-146, [INF-220 or INF-221]

INF-264 Networking Fundamentals II

This course continues to build skills needed to design, build, and maintain small to medium-sized networks. The combination of laboratory and lectures focus on a more detailed understanding of the Open System Interconnection [OSI] models, Wide Area Networks [WANs], routers and using the routers and associated router components. Students learn how to start and set up routers while developing configurations consistent with the various operating systems and topologies. This course assists in preparation towards the CISCO CCNA certification. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

INF-164

INF-265 Network Configuration I

This course provides students the skills required to design, build and configure small to medium sized networks using Cisco routers. Students are provided with classroom and laboratory experience using the latest networking technology. Topics include networking concepts, LAN and WAN implementation, wireless networking and custom subnet masking. The course assists in preparationtowards the Cisco CCNA certification. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

INF-160

INF-266 Network Configuration II

This course continues to build skills need to design, build and maintain small to medium sized networks. Topics include advanced switching, routing, Frame Relay, troubleshooting and network security. This student will gain these skills through hands on laboratory exercises configuring routers and switches. This course assists in preparation towards the Cisco CCNA certification.Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

INF-265

INF-267 Network Security

This course provides a foundation-level course that focuses on securing an enterprise's systems and networks. Topics presented include email security; web security; system hardening; incident response; public key infrastructure; disaster recovery; basics of cryptography; and methods for combating spam, securing a server, and preventing denial of service attacks. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

INF-160 or INF-170

INF-268 Advanced Java Programming

This course continues effective hands on instruction in the Java object-oriented, high-level programming language. Topics may include advanced array manipulation, object-oriented design solutions, exception handling, manipulating files and databases, Swing and graphical user interfaces, multimedia based programming, and Applets. Students will create programming project[s] that demonstrates their mastery of Java programming principles and concepts. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

INF-236

INF-270 Computer Crime

This course explores the use of networks as a tool of criminals. Our networked world has become a place of criminal activity that threatens our national security. This course discusses how a "networked" world has bred new crimes and new responses to those crimes and addresses the ways in which emerging technologies challenge existing laws and criminal procedures. Detecting and remediating national network security breaches will be explored. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

INF-160 or INF-170

Corequisites

INF-267

INF-271 Ethical Hacking

This course investigates the techniques used by malicious black-hat hackers to attack and penetrate a network. Students will learn to use these same hacking techniques to perform a white-hat ethical hack on the organization. Quantitative assessment and measurement of threats to information assets to determine where the organization is most vulnerable to hacking will be covered.Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

INF-160 or INF-170

Corequisites

INF-267

INF-272 Windows Active Directory

This course introduces students to the basics of managing enterprise level networks using Active Directory. Students learn to create users and groups, manage file permissions, configure server roles, use group policies to configure and secure the network, configure DNS and use certificates to secure the network. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

INF-160 or INF-170

INF-273 Intrusion Detection and Prevention

This course introduces the tools, methods and resources to help identify, assess and report unauthorized or unapproved network activity. Students will learn to analyze packets to find special patterns in network traffic, to monitor network traffic and to take action based on prescribed rules when an intrusion occurs. Students will configure Intrusion Prevention Systems/Intrusion Detection Systems, analyze results, and prevent network intrusions. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

INF-160 or INF-170

Corequisites

INF-267

INF-274 Wireless Networking

This course introduces students to wireless networking technology. The course covers wireless theory and how to apply it to modern networks. The course includes radio frequency fundamentals, wireless antennas and access, as well as configuring, managing and securing a wireless network. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

INF-160

INF-291 Co-Op Work Experience [Information Technology]

This course is a recommended elective designed to provide the INF student with part-time paid work experience in an office of his/her specialty. The student has the opportunity to learn and practice data processing skills under professional guidance in a college-approved work environment. Evaluation visitations are performed by a trained faculty member. All student appointmentsmust be approved by the Co-Op Coordinator. Job placement assistance is available through the Co-Op Office. 60 minimum hours work experience distributed over the semester. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [3.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

INF-101

INF-292 Co-Op Work Experience [Information Technology]

This course is recommended electives designed to provide the INF student with part-time paid work experience in an office of his/her specialty. The student has the opportunity to learn and practice data processing skills under professional guidance in a college-approved work environment. Evaluation visitations are performed by a trained faculty member. All student appointments must be approved by the Co-Op Coordinator. Job placement assistance is available through the Co-Op Office. 120 minimum hours work experience distributed over the semester. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [8.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

INF-101

INF-293 Co-Op Work Experience [Information Technology]

This course is recommended electives designed to provide the INF student with part-time paid work experience in an office of his/her specialty. The student has the opportunity to learn and practice data processing skills under professional guidance in a college-approved work environment. Evaluation visitations are performed by a trained faculty member. All student appointments must be approved by the Co-Op Coordinator. Job placement assistance is available through the Co-Op Office. 180 minimum hours work experience distributed over the semester. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [12.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

INF-101

INF-294 Co-Op Work Experience [Information Technology]

This course is recommended electives designed to provide the INF student with part-time paid work experience in an office of his/her specialty. The student has the opportunity to learn and practice data processing skills under professional guidance in a college-approved work environment. Evaluation visitations are performed by a trained faculty member. All student appointments must be approved by the Co-Op Coordinator. Job placement assistance is available through the Co-Op Office. 240 minimum hours work experience distributed over the semester. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [16.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

INF-101

IST-101 Introduction to Technological and Information Literacy [TIL] [A]

This course introduces students to the history and use of contemporary computer technology and to the retrieval, evaluation, and management of electronic and print information. The course covers various types of computer systems, college library systems, the Internet and its applications, networked information systems, traditional scholarly resources, central concepts underlyingthe research process, the social impact of developments in information technology [IT], and ethical, legal, and political aspects of technology and information utilization. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

IST-102 Introduction to Technological and Information Literacy [TIL] [B]

This course introduces students to the history and use of contemporary computer technology and to the retrieval, evaluation, and management of electronic and print information. The course covers various types of computer systems, college library systems, the Internet and its applications, networked information systems, traditional scholarly resources, central concepts underlyingthe research process, the social impact of developments in IT, and ethical, legal, and political aspects of technology and information utilization. [Must be taken with a TIL-intensive section of a General Education Course, such as COM-100 or WRT-101.] Lecture [1.00].

Credits

1

IST-121 Intro College Experience

This is a course which combines academic subject matter and substantial writing assignments in a discipline context established by the individual instructor. This course provides a learning opportunity for the student which includes communication skills, critical reasoning, problem solving, study skills, time management, and goal setting. The objective of this course is to help students understand the value and benefits of higher education as a life experience. Lecture [3.00]

Credits

2

IST-123 Success 101

This course is designed to help students achieve success in college. The course will focus on the strategies, habits, and values necessary for students to take charge of their own academic and personal development. Emphasis will be placed on self-assessment and goal setting, written and oral communication skills, critical thinking, time management, and study skills. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

IST-124 Success for AIMS

This course is designed to help students achieve success in college and in life. The course will focus on the strategies, habits, and values necessary for students to take charge of their own academic and personal development. Emphasis will be placed on self-assessment and goal-setting, written and oral communication skills, critical thinking, time management, and study skills.The course includes a practical component, which will focus on public speaking skills, computer literacy, and college etiquette. Lecture [3.00], Practicum [1.00].

Credits

3

IST-223 Success Practicum

This course is tailored to help students practice the knowledge acquired from Success 101 to achieve their goals in college and in life. Students will focus on career exploration, choosing a major, 4-year college transfer planning, student life and community building through Service Learning. Emphasis will be placed on self-exploration and goal setting, written and oral communication skills, critical thinking, time management and life skills.  Lecture [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

IST-123 or permission of your instructor or academic counselor

IST-281 Co-Op Work Experience [Interdisciplinary Studies]

This course provides the student with practical, supervised work experience in a professional environment. Through on-the-job experience, students can acquire knowledge and skills to pursue a career in their area of interest. A faculty member supervises students, and job placement assistance is available through the Co-Op Office. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [3.00].

Credits

1

IST-282 Co-Op Work Experience [Interdisciplinary Studies]

This course provides the student with practical, supervised work experience in a professional environment. Through on-the-job experience, students can acquire knowledge and skills to pursue a career in their area of interest. A faculty member supervises students, and job placement assistance is available through the Co-Op Office. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [8.00].

Credits

2

IST-283 Co-Op Work Experience [Interdisciplinary Studies]

This course provides the student with practical, supervised work experience in a professional environment. Through on-the-job experience, students can acquire knowledge and skills to pursue a career in their area of interest. A faculty member supervises students, and job placement assistance is available through the Co-Op Office. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [12.00].

Credits

3

IST-284 Co-Op Work Experience [Interdisciplinary Studies]

This course provides the student with practical, supervised work experience in a professional environment. Through on-the-job experience, students can acquire knowledge and skills to pursue a career in their area of interest. A faculty member supervises students, and job placement assistance is available through the Co-Op Office. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [16.00].

Credits

4

LAN-110 French I

This course is an introduction to the pronunciation, basic comprehension, and communication of French through active class use of simple vocabulary, grammar, and syntax. This course is recommended for students who have had two or less [including no] years of previous high school study of this language. Students with more than two years prior study should consult with the Academic Department Chair of the World Languages and Cultures Department for course placement guidance. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

3

LAN-111 German I

This course is an introduction to the pronunciation, basic comprehension, and communication of German through active class use of simple vocabulary, grammar, and syntax. This course is recommended for students who have had two or less [including no] years of previous high school study of this language. Students with more than two years prior study should consult with the Academic Department Chair of the World Languages and Cultures Department for course placement guidance. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

3

LAN-112 Italian I

This course is an introduction to the pronunciation, basic comprehension, and communication of Italian through active class use of simple vocabulary, grammar, and syntax. This course is recommended for students who have had two or less [including no] years of previous high school study of this language. Students with more than two years prior study should consult with the Academic Department Chair of the World Languages and Cultures Department for course placement guidance. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

3

LAN-113 Spanish I

This course is an introduction to the pronunciation, basic comprehension, and communication of Spanish through active class use of simple vocabulary, grammar, and syntax. This course is recommended for students who have had two or less [including no] years of previous high school study of this language. Students with more than two years prior study should consult with the Academic Department Chair of the World Languages and Cultures Department for course placement guidance. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

3

LAN-114 Russian I

This course is an introduction to the pronunciation, basic comprehension, and communication of Russian through active class use of simple vocabulary, grammar, and syntax. This course is recommended for students who have had two or less [including no] years of previous high school study of this language. Students with more than two years prior study should consult with the Academic Department Chair of the World Languages and Cultures Department for course placement guidance. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

3

LAN-115 Arabic I

This course is an introduction to the pronunciation, basic comprehension and communication of Arabic through active class use of simple vocabulary, grammar and syntax. The class will hold group discussions which focus on Arab Culture and Traditions in various geographical areas in the Arab world. This course is recommended for students who have had one or no years of previous high school study of this language. Students with two or more years prior study, please refer to the World Languages and Cultures Placement Policy on this syllabus. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

3

LAN-116 Chinese [Mandarin] I

This course is an introduction to the pronunciation, basic comprehension, and communication of Chinese through active class use of simple vocabulary, grammar, and syntax. It is recommended for students who have had two or less [including no] years of previous high school study of this language. Students with more than two years prior should consult with the Academic Department Chair of the World Languages and Cultures Department for course placement guidance. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

3

LAN-119 Latin I

This course is an introduction to the pronunciation, basic comprehension, and communication of Latin through active class use of vocabulary, grammar, syntax, and to the culture of the ancient Romans. This course is recommended for students who have had one or less [including no] years of previous high school study of this language. Students with more than two or more years prior study should consult the World Languages and Cultures Placement Policy on this syllabus. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

3

LAN-120 Japanese I

This course is an introduction to the pronunciation, basic comprehension, and communication of Japanese through active class use of simple vocabulary, grammar, and syntax. This course is recommended for students who have had two or less [including no] years of previous high school study of this language. Students with more than two years prior study should consult with the Academic Department Chair of the World Languages and Cultures Department for course placement guidance. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

3

LAN-144 Irish I

This course is an introduction to the pronunciation, basic comprehension, and communication of Irish through active class use of simple vocabulary, grammar, and syntax. This course is recommended for students who have had two or less [including] no years of previous high school study of this Gaelic language. Students with more than two years prior study should consult with the Academic Department Chair of the World Languages and Cultures Department for course placement guidance. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

3

LAN-150 Spanish for Health Professions

This course is designed to enable individuals in the health career programs/professions to communicate with Spanish speaking clients in a variety of settings. Participants will learn interview and assessment skills, as well as other health related terminology. Through the acquisition of these skills, an understanding of Spanish speaking cultures will be attained. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

LAN-165 Korean I

This course is an introduction to the pronunciation, basic comprehension, and communication of Korean through active class use of simple vocabulary, grammar, and syntax. This course is recommended for students who have had two or less [including no] years of previous high school study of this language. Students with more than 2 years prior study should consult with the AcademicDepartment Chair of the World Languages and Cultures Department for course placement guidance. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

3

LAN-170 American Sign Language I

This course is an introduction to the expressive and receptive skills required for communication in American Sign Language [ASL]. Through active class use of basic vocabulary, grammar, and syntax, students will begin exploration of Deaf Culture and begin to learn the language of that culture. This course is recommended for students who have had less than one year of previous study of this language. Students with more than two years of prior study should consult with the Academic Department Chair of the World Languages and Cultures Department for course placement guidance. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

3

LAN-180 Hebrew I

This course is an introduction to the pronunciation, basic comprehension, and communication of Hebrew through active class use of simple vocabulary, grammar, and syntax. It is recommended for students who have had less than one year of previous study of this language. Students with more than two years of prior study should consult with the Academic Department Chair of the WorldLanguages and Cultures Department for course placement guidance. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

3

LAN-200 French II

This course offers students an opportunity to enhance their skills in the speaking, reading, writing, and comprehension of French through active class use of vocabulary, grammar, and syntax. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LAN-110; minimum grade C

LAN-201 Intermediate French I

This course expands students? French vocabulary and enhances their conversational ability. The course is conducted entirely in French and features extensive discussion of contemporary France and some grammar review. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LAN-200; minimum grade C

LAN-210 German II

This course offers students an opportunity to enhance their skills in the speaking, reading, writing, and comprehension of German through active class use of vocabulary, grammar, and syntax. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LAN-111; minimum grade C

LAN-211 Intermediate German I

This course expands students? German vocabulary and enhances their conversational ability. The course is conducted entirely in German and features extensive discussion of contemporary Germany and some grammar review. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LAN-210; minimum grade C

LAN-220 Italian II

This course offers students an opportunity to enhance skills in the speaking, reading, writing, and comprehension of Italian through active class use of vocabulary, grammar, and syntax. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LAN-112; minimum grade C

LAN-221 Intermediate Italian I

This course expands students? Italian vocabulary and enhances their conversational ability. The course is conducted entirely in Italian and features extensive discussion of contemporary Italy and some grammar review. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LAN-220; minimum grade C

LAN-222 Intermediate Italian II

This course is conducted entirely in Italian and develops students' Italian communication skills through a study of the cultural history of Italy. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LAN-221; minimum grade C

LAN-228 Elementary Spanish for Heritage Speakers

This course is designed to address the needs of Hispanic/Latino students who can communicate in Spanish but need to develop and/or improve their reading and writing skills. It addresses specific linguistic issues such as diction, orthography, and sentence structure. The course is conducted in Spanish and includes cultural discussions. Recommended for students with some previousSpanish language instruction. >General Education Course. Lecture [4.00].

Credits

3

LAN-229 Intermediate Spanish for Heritage Speakers

This course is a continuation of Elementary Spanish for Heritage Speakers. It continues to develop reading and writing skills, and to address linguistic issues. The course is conducted in Spanish and includes cultural discussions. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LAN-228; minimum grade C

LAN-230 Spanish II

This course offers students an opportunity to enhance their skills in the speaking, reading, writing, and comprehension of Spanish through active class use of vocabulary, grammar, and syntax. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LAN-113; minimum grade C

LAN-231 Intermediate Spanish I

This course expands students? Spanish vocabulary and enhances their conversational and reading ability. The course is conducted entirely in Spanish and focuses upon more complex grammatical structures as well as upon discussions about the Hispanic culture. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LAN-230; minimum grade C

LAN-232 Intermediate Spanish II

This course is conducted entirely in Spanish and develops students Spanish communication skills through a study of the cultural history of Spain and Latin America. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LAN-231; minimum grade C

LAN-233 Spanish Conversation

This course emphasizes the spoken language, stressing fluency and correctness of structure, pronunciation, and vocabulary. Topics of discussion may include current cultural, social, and literary events. Students receive individualized instruction in syntax and vocabulary. This course is conducted in the target language. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LAN-230; minimum grade C

LAN-236 Spanish American Literature

This course is a study of Spanish American literature from 1492 to the present. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LAN-231

LAN-240 Russian II

This course offers students an opportunity to enhance their skills in the speaking, reading, writing, and comprehension of Russian through active class use of vocabulary, grammar, and syntax. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LAN-114; minimum grade C

LAN-241 Intermediate Russian

This course expands students' Russian vocabulary and enhances their conversational ability. The course is conducted entirely in Russian and features extensive discussion of contemporary Russia and some grammar review. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LAN-240; minimum grade C

LAN-244 Irish II

This course offers students an opportunity to enhance their skills in the speaking, reading, writing, and comprehension of Irish, one of the Gaelic languages, through active class use of vocabulary, grammar, and syntax. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LAN-144; minimum grade C

LAN-255 Arabic II

This course offers students an opportunity to enhance skills in the speaking, reading, writing and comprehension of Arabic through active class use of vocabulary, grammar and syntax. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LAN-115; minimum grade C

LAN-256 Intermediate Arabic I

This course expands students' Arabic vocabulary and enhances their conversational ability. The course is conducted entirely in Arabic and features extensive discussion of the contemporary Arab World and some grammar review. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LAN-255; minimum grade C

LAN-260 Japanese II

This course offers students an opportunity to enhance their skills in the speaking, reading, writing, and comprehension of Japanese through active class use of vocabulary, grammar, and syntax. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LAN-120; minimum grade C

LAN-261 Intermediate Japanese I

This course expands students' Japanese vocabularyand enhances their conversational ability. The course is conducted entirely in Japanese and features extensive discussions of contemporary Japan and some grammar review. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LAN-260; minimum grade C

LAN-262 Intermediate Japanese II

This course expands the students' vocabulary and enhances their conversational and reading ability through class discussions, pair/group work, simulations, and oral presentations. The course is conducted entirely in Japanese with some grammar review and features extensive discussions of contemporary Japanese culture. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LAN-261; minimum grade C

LAN-265 Korean II

This course offers students an opportunity to enhance their skills in the speaking, reading, writing and comprehension of Korean through active class use of vocabulary, grammar and syntax. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LAN-165; minimum grade C

LAN-266 Intermediate Korean I

This course expands students' Korean vocabulary and enhances their conversations ability. The course is conducted entirely in Korean and features extensive discussion of contemporary Korea and some grammar. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LAN-265; minimum grade C

LAN-270 American Sign Language II

This course is a continuation of American Sign Language I designed to further develop competency in ASL. Students will be given the opportunity to enhance both expressive and receptive skills by increasing vocabulary and knowledge of grammar. Students will be expected to interact with the deaf community in real-life settings thereby enhancing their awareness of and sensitivityto various aspects of Deaf Culture and ASL. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LAN-170; minimum grade C

LAN-271 Intermediate American Sign Language I

This course expands students? vocabulary and enhances their expressive and receptive skills through class discussions, pair/group work, simulations, and presentations. The course is conducted entirely in American Sign Language. It includes grammar review and features extensive discussions of Deaf culture. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LAN-270; minimum grade C

LAN-272 Intermediate American Sign Language II

This course develops American Sign Language communication skills through the study of the cultural history of the Deaf community. It is conducted entirely in American Sign Language. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LAN-271; minimum grade C

LAN-276 Chinese [Mandarin] II

This course offers students an opportunity to enhance their skills in listening, speaking, reading, writing, and comprehension of Chinese through active class use of vocabulary, grammar and syntax. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LAN-116; minimum grade C

LAN-277 Intermediate Chinese [Mandarin] I

This course expands students' Chinese vocabulary and enhances their conversational ability. the course is conducted entirely in Chinese and features extensive discussion of contemporary China and some grammar. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LAN-276; minimum grade C

LAN-278 Intermediate Chinese [Mandarin] II

This course is conducted entirely in Chinese and develops students' Chinese communication skills through a study of the culture of china and some grammar. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LAN-277; minimum grade C

LAN-280 Hebrew II

This course offers students an opportunity to enhance their skills in listening, speaking, reading, writing, and comprehension of Hebrew through active class use of vocabulary, grammar and syntax. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LAN-180

LAN-289 Latin II

This course offers students an opportunity to enhance their skills in translating, reading, writing, speaking, and comprehension of Latin through active class use of vocabulary, grammar, syntax, and their knowledge of Roman culture. Class sessions will include discussions, translations, pair/group work, simulations, oral presentations, and extensive discussions on Roman culture.> General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LAN-119; minimum grade C

LGL-101 Fundamentals of Law

This course is an introduction to the principles of substantive law in the fields of contracts, legal ethics, sales, consumer remedies, torts, crimes, and secured transactions, and analyzes the court systems. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

LGL-103 Legal Search and Writing

This course is an introduction to legal practice. Topics covered include law office systems, legal research, legal forms, and briefs. Research problems and case memo term papers are assigned. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Corequisites

WRT-101

LGL-104 Healthcare Ethics and Law

This is a survey course dedicated to the analysis and application of Healthcare Ethics and Law. Emphasis is placed on analysis of the legal and healthcare environment and its relationship to medical ethics. Students will examine case studies and will learn to identify and respond to legal and ethical issues. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Cross Listed Courses

HSC-102

LGL-110 Legal Ethics

This is a survey course dedicated to the analysis and application of New Jersey Legal Ethics Issues. Emphasis is placed on understanding New Jersey Rules of Professional Responsibility, New Jersey Supreme Court Office of Attorney Ethics Advisory Opinions, ABA Model Rules, Canons of Professional Ethics, and the professional and regulatory structure of the practice of law. The course will also explore the disciplinary and licensing process applicable to legal professionals. Students to identify, evaluate, and respond to legal ethical issues. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

LGL-200 Business Communication for Paralegals

This course covers the communications skills of writing, speaking, and listening, with particular applications to paralegals. Emphasis is placed on effective techniques to be used in interviews and meetings. Students learn how to prepare letters, memos, and reports. Oral presentations are included. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LGL-101, LGL-103

LGL-202 New Jersey and Federal Courts [Fall Only ? Evening]

This course is a study of the Rules of Court for the New Jersey Court System as they relate to court processes and procedures including pleadings, depositions, interrogatories, summary judgment, appellate practice, and rules of evidence. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LGL-101, LGL-103, LGL-203, LGL-220

LGL-203 Paralegalism

This course is a study of the role of a paralegal in the public sector. Topics of discussion include ethics and litigation support including methods of investigating cases and of preparing legal memoranda and other legal documents. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LGL-101, LGL-103

LGL-205 Mechanics of Property Transactions [Fall Only ? Evening]

This course is a study of New Jersey real estate legal practice and procedures concentrating on such topics as conveyance, forms, and the theory and practice of real estate transactions. Sample cases are used to illustrate the paralegal's role in a real property conveyance. Students examine case studies and prepare a sample problem from contract to closing. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LGL-101, LGL-103, LGL-220, REA-101

LGL-206 Mechanics of Commercial Transactions [Spring Only ? Evening]

This course is a study of legal forms, procedure and practice for organizing a business entity, sale of a business, equipment leasing, and other commercial transactions. Students examine case studies and prepare a sample problem for sale of a business. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LGL-101, LGL-103, LGL-220

LGL-207 Wills and Administrations [Fall Only - Evening]

This course is a study of the New Jersey law of wills, probate, and estate administration. Topics of discussion include the preparation of wills, probate procedures, and the preparation of New Jersey Inheritance and Federal Estate Tax forms. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LGL-101, LGL-103, LGL-220

LGL-208 Mechanics of Family Law

This course is an introduction to New Jersey family law. Topics of discussion include divorce, annulment, equitable distribution of assets, child custody, alimony, and support and visitation of children. New Jersey forms and procedures are reviewed. Students examine case studies and prepare matrimonial pleadings and pretrial memoranda. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LGL-101,LGL-103, LGL-220

LGL-209 Nonprofit Law

This course is dedicated to the analysis and application of New Jersey Nonprofit Corporation Law. Emphasis is placed on understanding New Jersey Statutes Title 15A. The course explores the effective and practical use of the nonprofit corporation from formation, application in business practices to dissolution. Students learn about formation, corporate powers, specific purpose nonprofits, tax aspects, boards, officers, minutes, registered agents, meetings and dissolution of nonprofits. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BUS-115

LGL-210 Legal Accounting

This course is a study of accounting concepts for the paralegal. The trust and escrow accounting reporting rules of the New Jersey Supreme Court are discussed. Hourly records, billing procedures, and accounting concepts are studied as they relate to legal situations. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LGL-101, LGL-103, LGL-203

LGL-219 Hospitality Law

This provides industry specific legal fundamentals to students and practicing professionals in the hospitality industry. It introduces basic foundations and principles of the law affecting the hospitality industry and introduces guidelines and techniques that show managers how to manage preventively and apply a practical legal awareness to their actions. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HRM-101

LGL-220 Computer Assisted Legal Research

This course introduces the student to modern technologies which allow efficient and accurate legal research. The course incorporates Westlaw, legal software, and the Internet into the legal research process and requires students to complete assigned computer research projects. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LGL-101, LGL-103

LGL-232 Immigration Law

This course teaches paralegals the practices and procedures in the specialty of immigration law. Lecture [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

LGL-203

LGL-234 Personal Injury and Product Liability [Spring Only - Evening]

This course teaches paralegals the practice and procedures used in the developing specializations of personal injury and product liability torts. Students will examine case studies and will prepare legal forms for sample case problems. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LGL-203, LGL-220

LGL-292 Co-Op Work Experience [Paralegal]

This course requires part-time student employment in a law office, banking institution, court or other law-related position and aims at giving students insight into the methods and procedures used by paralegals. Job assistance is available through the Co-Op office. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [12.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

LGL-101, LGL-103, LGL-202, LGL-205, LGL-208, LGL-220; and WRT-101. The student must have attained a "C" or better grade in WRT-101 and WRT-201 and all paralegal specialty courses.

LGN-105 Principles of Legal Nurse Consulting

This course examines the history and evolution of nurse consulting and legal theories. The role of the legal nurse consultant is explored as it relates to the review and analysis of medical records, litigation process, trial and witness preparation, standards of care, risk management, insurance issues, and alternative forms of dispute resolution. Business principles for legal nurse consultants are also covered. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

LGN-201 Health Law

This course provides an overview of the American health care system, examining its historical origins and the interplay of competing interests. It examines managed care organizations [MCOs] including [HMOs, PPOs, PHOs, IPAs, etc.]; and MCO regulatory issues, such as licensing and certificate-of-need requirements and patient rights legislation; legal implications of the transactions engaged in by MCOs; fraud and abuse in the health care system; managed care contracting including contract drafting and analysis; legal issues concerning hospitals; Medicare and Medicaid; interaction health law with medical malpractice. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LGN-105, LGL-101, LGL-103

LGN-204 Medical Legal Ethics, Records, and Writing

This course requires the production and preparation of medical records summaries which includes identifying standards of care; accessing, interpreting and summarizing medical records; interviewing clients; medical witnesses and preparation of the legal nurse consultant's report. Additionally, the course covers legal and medical ethics. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

3

LGN-210 Advanced Medical Legal Research

This course develops advanced research skills employing Westlaw, Medical, and Internet research. Students will become facile users of legal and medical databases online, including the Internet. Course focuses on medical and legal research used in determining appropriate standards of care. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

LGL-101, LGL-103, LGN-105, LGN-204

LGN-292 Co-Op Work Experience [Legal Nurse]

This course requires that the student complete all legal nurse specialty courses with a grade of C or better. This course can only be taken in the last semester of the Legal Nurse Program. The student must meet with the instructor and jointly prepare an agreed 179 hour lab for the course which will include on-site study and assignments in a legal nurse setting such as a hospital, HMO, doctor's office or law office plus sample medical-legal research and document assignments from the instructor. In addition, the course will meet one [1] hour each week. Two or more class absences will require repeat of the course. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [12.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

LGN-105, LGN-201, LGN-204, LGN-210

LIT-201 American Literature to 1880

This course is a study of representative American literature from its origins to the late nineteenth century. Students read selections from such areas as exploration narratives and Native American poetry, and from such authors as Bradstreet, Edwards, Douglass, Emerson, Hawthorne, Melville, Dickinson, and Whitman. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00]. 1

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

LIT-202 American Literature 1880 to Present

This course is a study of representative American literature from the late nineteenth century to the present. Students read works by such authors as Twain, O'Neill, Hurston, Hemingway, Faulkner, Frost, Wright, Ginsberg, and Rich. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

LIT-203 World Literature to 1650

This course is a study of world authors to the sixteenth century. Students read works such as Gilgamesh; selections from the Old and New Testaments, the Ramayana; and writings of such authors as Homer, Aeschylus, Li Po, Dante, Shakespeare, and Sor Juana. > General Education Course. >Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

LIT-204 World Literature 1650 to Present

This course is a study of world authors from the sixteenth century to the present. Students read works by such authors as Wu Ch'Eng-En, Racine, Goethe, Flaubert, Tolstoy, Eliot, Mahfouz, and Achebe. >General Education Course. >Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

LIT-205 English Literature to 1800

This course is a study of British literature from Anglo-Saxon times to the late eighteenth century. Students read works such as Beowulf and such authors as Chaucer, Kempe, Shakespeare, Milton, Dryden, Pope, and Swift. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

LIT-206 English Literature 1800 to Present

This course is a study of British literature from the Romantic period to the present. Students read works by such authors as Blake, Wordsworth, Austen, Hardy, Dickens, Yeats, Lawrence, Woolf, and Thomas. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

LIT-210 Introduction to the Short Story

This course is a study of short fiction: the stylistic and technical qualities of the genre, its kinship with narrative forms that stretch to the earliest literatures of diverse cultures, and the range of themes expressed in short stories, by authors writing in English and a variety of other languages. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

LIT-215 Black Literature in America

This course is a study of major African-American authors. The course provides a literary, historical, and sociological survey of the African-American experience. Students read works by such authors as Wheatley, Douglass, Ellison, Hurston, Baldwin, Malcolm X, Morrison, and Walker. >General Education Course. >Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

LIT-216 European Literature to 1650

This course is a study of European authors from Greco-Roman times to the Renaissance. Representative works are studied in their historical context. The course includes selections from such works as the Bible, ancient Greek tragedies and comedies, medieval epics and dramas, and such authors as Sappho, Plato, Virgil, Dante, Marie de France, Shakespeare, and Milton. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

LIT-218 American Ethnic Literature

This course examines the literature of America's ethnic groups. The course draws upon significant works of fiction, poetry, drama, and autobiography written by representatives of such groups as Native Americans, Hispanics, Irish, Jews, Asians, Blacks, and Italians. >General Education Course. >Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

LIT-220 Social Aspects of Literature

This course examines various concerns and issues that exist within human communities. The course allows students to explore social structures and the role of the individual within a larger social context, with the aim of developing a greater understanding of the interaction of self and society. Literary texts provide the foundation for discussion and analysis. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

LIT-221 Shakespeare

This course is an introduction to the works of William Shakespeare. Students will read several plays and sonnets. The variety of Shakespeare's themes, such as the nature of love, betrayal, leadership, and the power of art, will be examined. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

LIT-222 Introduction to Literary Criticism

This course provides students with the tools of literary critical theory. Students will be exposed to a variety of critical theories and will gain proficiency in applying these theories to selected poems, short stories, and novels. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

LIT-223 Contemporary Latin American Literature

In this course, students will read poetry, essays, short prose, and novels from several Latin American nations including Colombia, Peru, Cuba, Argentina, Mexico, Brazil, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, and Chile. We will also examine Latin American literature from various critical perspectives. >Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

LIT-224 International Literature

This course is an exploration of major themes in the literature of various cultures. Each semester a specific theme is developed through the study of literary works that are representative of a number of nations and cultures. >Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

LIT-226 Introduction to the Novel

This course is an introduction to the novel as a literary genre from its beginnings to the present. Authors to be studied may include, but are not limited to, Lady Murasaki, Cervantes, Richardson, Fielding, Voltaire, Austen, Melville, Dickens, Eliot, Flaubert, Dostoevsky, James, Joyce, Garcia Marquez, Achebe, Mahfouz, and Bolano. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

LIT-227 Introduction to Poetry

This course is a representative study of poetic forms and poetry from around the world. Through a close examination of the poetry, students will explore the evolution of poetic form, literary movements and a wide range of themes addressed through poetry. Topics for discussion and analysis will include historical, cultural, and social influences. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

LIT-228 Women in Literature

This course is a study of representative works by women writers in a variety of forms. The course provides a literary, historical, and sociological context for the study of this literature. Students read works by such authors as Julian of Norwich, Dickinson, Chopin, Woolf, Emecheta, Morrison, and Tan. >General Education Course. >Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

LIT-229 Myth and Literature

This course gives students an overview of the mythology of various selected cultures and shows the relation of mythology to our everyday lives. Works ranges from antiquity to the present. After taking this course, students will be able to analyze and understand mythic symbols in literature [poetry, short stories, or novels.] Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

LIT-230 Psychological Ideas in Literature

This is a course in which students read and study psychological ideas in literature. Themes such as exile, the unconscious, psychosis, and dreams will be addressed. Works range from antiquity to the present. The basic objective of the course is to raise provoking questions about psychological ideas in literature and to draw out the many ways in which psychology informs and offsets a literary perspective. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

LIT-231 Literature & Environmental Issues

This course traces the evolution of literary responses to our natural environment. Students will engage with a range of literary forms including (but not limited to) pastoral verse, Transcendentalist prose, Romantic lyric, post-industrial parody, postcolonial poetics, and climate fiction (or "cli-fi"). Students will likewise study corresponding critical methodologies, including, postcolonial criticism and ecocriticism, in addition to a range of global environmental histories. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

MAT-010 Basic Mathematics Support

This course is a review class designed to provide additional instructional time for students enrolled simultaneously in MAT-011. Lecture [1.00].

Credits

1

MAT-011 Basic Mathematics

This course is a study of the fundamental operations of arithmetic, intended for students whose placement examination indicates a need for review of arithmetic skills. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

MAT-012 Basic Mathematics Accelerated [Computer Assisted]

This course is a computer assisted class designed to provide the necessary reinforcement needed to complete the Basic Mathematics, MAT-011, requirements. Lecture [1.00].

Credits

1

MAT-040 Algebra for Liberal Arts

This course is for students whose program of study does not require the completion of MAT-160 Intermediate Algebra and whose placement score indicates a need for a review of basic algebra. MAT-040 does satisfy the prerequisite requirement for MAT-130, MAT-150 and MAT-155. Topics include signed numbers, variables, integral exponents, linear equations and problem solving, graphing equations, systems of equations and exponents and polynomials. Lecture [4.00]

Credits

4

Prerequisites

MAT-011 with a grade of C or better or by testing.

MAT-044 Algebra Topics

This is an algebra course for students who have completed MAT-040 Algebra for Liberal Arts and whose program of study requires the completion of MAT-160 Intermediate Algebra. Topics include integral exponents, polynomials, and absolute value equations. Rational expressions, square roots and quadratic. Lecture [3.00]

Credits

3

Prerequisites

MAT-040 with a grade of C or better.

MAT-048 Algebra [5.00 cr. (non-degree)

This course is a basic algebra course for students whose placement examination indicates a need for review in algebra and whose program of study requires the completion of MAT-160 Intermediate Algebra. MAT-048 does satisfy the prerequisite requirement for MAT-160. Topics include signed numbers, variables, literal equations and formulas, square roots, integral exponents, polynomials, linear, quadratic and absolute value equations, rational expressions, and inequalities. Lecture [5.00] .

Credits

5 (non-degree)

Prerequisites

MAT-011 with a grade of C or better

MAT-090 Intermediate Algebra Support

This course is a recitation class designed to provide additional instructional time for students enrolled in or repeating MAT-160. Lecture [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

MAT-040 or MAT-048; minimum grade C.

Corequisites

MAT-160

MAT-091 Pre-Calculus Support

This course is a recitation class designed to provide additional instructional time for students enrolled in or repeating MAT-180. Lecture [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

MAT-160; minimum grade C.

Corequisites

MAT-180

MAT-092 Calculus I Support

Calculus I Support is a recitation class designed to provide additional instructional time for students enrolled simultaneously in MAT-280. Lecture [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

MAT-180; minimum grade C.

Corequisites

MAT-280

MAT-093 Calculus II Support

This course is a recitation class designed to provide additional instructional time for students enrolled simultaneously in MAT-281. Lecture [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

MAT-280; minimum grade C.

Corequisites

MAT-281

MAT-130 Contemporary Math

This course is a study of some of the fundamental concepts in mathematics. Topics considered include set theory, symbolic logic, number systems, principles of counting, and probability. Applications of these topics in various fields of study are included in the course. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

MAT-040 or MAT-048

MAT-150 Statistics I

This course is a study of frequency distributions, measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability, the normal distribution, sampling and sampling distributions, the central limit theorem, confidence interval estimation, and hypothesis testing. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

MAT-040 or MAT-048

MAT-155 Finite Mathematics

This course is an introduction to the solution of problems in the management, natural, behavioral, and social sciences. Topics covered include mathematical models, matrices, linear systems, and linear programming. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

MAT-040 or MAT-048

MAT-160 Intermediate Algebra

This course is the study of polynomial and rational expressions, integral and fractional expressions, roots and radicals, linear and quadratic equations, functions, elementary curve sketching, and inequalities. Lecture [4.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

MAT-044 or MAT-048; minimum grade C

MAT-180 Precalculus: College Algebra and Trigonometry

This course is a study of coordinate geometry; functions and graphing; polynomial and rational functions; exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, and inverse trigonometric functions; analytic geometry, and applications. >General Education Course. Lecture [4.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

MAT-160; minimum grade C

MAT-223 Calculus for the Managerial and Social Sciences

This course covers the essential ideas of the Calculus: functions, limits, continuity, differentiation and integration. The course includes applications to problems in business, economics, psychology, the social sciences and mathematical modeling. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

MAT-160; minimum grade C

MAT-250 Statistics II

This course is an introduction to methods for the design of research studies and the interpretation of data that result from these studies. Topics considered include a brief review of elementary statistical concepts, additional cases of hypothesis testing and estimation, analysis of variance, analysis of enumerative data, linear regression and correlation, and nonparametric statistics. Laboratory assignments using a statistical software package are included in the course. >General Education Course. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

MAT-150; minimum grade C

MAT-268 Statistical Methods

This course provides the student with a foundation in the techniques that underlie more advanced courses in statistics. Topics include descriptive statistics, sampling distributions, hypotheses testing and estimation for one and two populations, goodness-of-fit and contingency tables, analysis of variance, linear regression and correlation, and nonparametric statistics. Lecture[4.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

MAT-160; minimum grade C

MAT-280 Calculus I

This course is a study of limits, continuity, the derivative of a function, differentiation of algebraic, trigonometric, inverse trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions, applications of the derivative, antidifferentiation, area under a curve, the definite integral, the Fundamental Theorem of the Calculus and its applications. >General Education Course. Lecture [4.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

MAT-180; minimum grade C

MAT-281 Calculus II

This course is a study of differentiation and integration of transcendental functions, methods of integration, applications of the integral, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, infinite series, power series, and applications. >General Education Course. Lecture [4.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

MAT-280; minimum grade C

MAT-282 Calculus III

This course is a study of vectors, partial differentiation, directional derivatives, gradients, multiple integrals, vector calculus, line integrals, topics from vector analysis, and applications. >General Education Course. Lecture [4.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

MAT-281; minimum grade C

MAT-283 Differential Equations

This course covers equations of order 1, linear equations with constant coefficients, non-homogeneous equations, variation of parameters, series solutions, equations with variable coefficients, Laplace transforms, convolutions, boundary value problems, Fourier transforms and applications. Lecture [4.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

MAT-282; minimum grade C

MAT-285 Discrete Mathematics

This course is a study of mathematical concepts and techniques that form the foundation for many upper level mathematics courses. Topics considered include sets and logic, proof techniques, functions and relations, algorithms, introduction to number theory, counting techniques, discrete probability, recurrence relations, trees, graphs, networks, and Boolean algebra. Mathematical reasoning and proofs with be stressed. Lecture [4.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

MAT-280; minimum grade C

MAT-286 Linear Algebra

This course is a study of finite dimensional vector spaces. Topics considered include vectors and vector spaces, matrices, determinants, systems of linear equations, linear transformations, quadratic forms, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and applications. Lecture [4.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

MAT-280

MFG-119 Pro/Engineer Design I

This course is a study of the basic functionality and use of Parametric Technology's [PTC] Pro/Engineer Wildfire 3D solid modeling software. Emphasis will be placed on the technology as well as the terminology in relation to this advanced tool. Lecture and lab will be used to teach not only how to use specific features of the software but also how to use it in design. Lecture[2.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

3

MFG-122 Machine Tool Principles I

This course introduces students to the basic hands-on theoretical skills necessary of a machinist. Machining processes such as drilling, milling, turning, and grinding will be studied and developed. Theoretical skills such as machine terminology, speeds and feeds, uses of machinery handbook, and safety issues are also included. It would be beneficial if incoming students had some exposure to basic machining principles and equipment. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

MFG-124 Applied Metrology

This course is the study of the fundamental skills used by machinists for the calibration and quality control of measurements and their application. Students will study and use precision measuring equipment such as calipers, dial indicators, gauges, and hole measuring devices in a practical laboratory. Use of Coordinate Measurement Machine and Optical Comparator will also be introduced. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

MFG-130 Welding Technology I

This course is an introduction to metal joining techniques using welding, brazing, and soldering with an emphasis on safe work practices. This course provides students with a basic understanding of electricity as applied to electric arc welders, metallurgy of welding, welding processes and safe use of oxy/fuel welding and heating. Students will study theory and techniques in a classroom environment. Demonstrations and applications will be performed in a laboratory setting. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

MFG-206 Concepts of Industrial Design

This course is an exploration of 2D and 3D techniques used by industrial designers to communicate ideas for new products and product designs. Course includes a brief history of industrial design. Exercises in ideation and conceptualization will be used to familiarize students with design development philosophy. Use of freehand drawing techniques and drafting skills will be explained to produce presentations of proposed product concepts. Model making techniques will be explored to develop 3D communication skills. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

DFT-107

MFG-219 Pro/Engineer Design II

This course is a study of the intermediate to advanced functionality of Parametric Technology Corporation's Pro/Engineer 3D solid modeling software. Emphasis will be placed on the technology as well as the various design techniques in relation to this advanced tool. Lecture and lab will be used to teach not only how to use specific features of the software but also how to use it in design. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

MFG-119

MFG-220 Pro/Engineer Design III

This course includes advanced techniques for the design and analysis using Pro/Engineer, Pro/Sheetmetal, and Pro/Mechanica. Emphasis will be placed on the technology as well as utilizing advanced techniques in relation to both lab exercises as well as a practical design. Lecture, lab, and a comprehensive project will be used to teach how to use specific features of the softwarein relation to product design. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

MFG-219

MFG-221 Pro/Engineer Design IV

This course includes advanced techniques for the design and analysis using Pro/Engineer Pro/Mechanica. Emphasis will be placed on the technology as well utilizing advanced techniques in relation to both lab exercises as well as practical design. Lecture, lab, and a comprehensive project will be used to teach how to use specific features of the software in relation to product design. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

MFG-220

MFG-222 Machine Tool Principles II

This course continues the work of Machine Tool Principles I by broadening the basic skills of a machinist by introducing intermediate and advanced topics such as milling and turning tools and their geometry, tool inserts, coolants and basic metallurgy. Students will experience these topics both in theory and hands-on in a practical laboratory setting. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory[2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

MFG-122

MFG-226 Methods, Fixture Design, and Estimating

This course will explore and develop the skills necessary to mentally visualize how to effectively and economically make precision-machined parts. Students will learn how to select materials, type of process, type of equipment, sequence of operations, fixtures, tools, etc. Methods development and documentation will be demonstrated and practiced. Jig and fixture types and designcriteria will be reviewed. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00]. ]

Credits

3

Prerequisites

MFG-224, [DFT-210 or MFG-119]

MFG-227 CNC Programming I

This course provides the fundamentals of programming Computer Numerical Control equipment with a heavy concentration on CNC turning and machining centers. Included in this course will be language and graphics-based programming, automated features and capabilities, advanced CNC applications and integration. Students will receive hands-on programming experience using industry preferred software and controllers. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [4.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

MFG-229

Corequisites

DFT-210, MFG-119

MFG-228 CNC Programming II

This course continues the work of CNC Programming I by expanding the skills of programming with advanced techniques and equipment such as 5-Axis programming, use of A, B, and C-Axes, development and use of macros, program verification, and troubleshooting. MasterCAM software for the use of part design, NC code production, and back-plotting will be introduced. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

MFG-227

MFG-229 Materials Processing and Fabrication

This course will include both an overview of materials and processes used in the manufacture of precision products and a practical exploration of fabrication techniques used in industry. A comparative study of casting, welding, heat treating, molding, laminating, EDM, CNC machining, grinding, etc. will be undertaken, as well as forming processes such as rolling, shearing, stamping, cutting, and joining methods for metallic and non-metallic materials. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [4.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

MFG-122, MFG-124, DFT-107

MFG-230 Welding Technology II

This course expands on the concepts and applications presented in MFG-130. Further exploration of the construction of welded components and the metallurgic effects on more exotic materials will take place. Students will study the application of welding to aluminum, magnesium, copper alloys, nickel and cobalt alloys, lead, and zinc. Related safety and health considerations will be addressed. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

MFG-130

MFG-293 Co-Op Work Experience [Manufacturing]

This course provides the student with practical, supervised work experience within the broad field of manufacturing technology. Through on-the-job experience, students can acquire the practical expertise and knowledge needed to pursue a career in this field. Students are supervised by a faculty member, and job placement assistance is available through the Co-Op Office. 1 lecture, plus 180 minimum hours work experience distributed over the semester or over combined summer sessions. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [12.00].

Credits

3

MFG-294 Co-Op Work Experience [Manufacturing]

This course provides the student with practical, supervised work experience within the broad field of manufacturing technology. Through on-the-job experience, students can acquire the practical expertise and knowledge needed to pursue a career in this field. Students are supervised by a faculty member, and job placement assistance is available through the Co-Op Office. 1 lecture, plus 240 minimum hours work experience distributed over the semester or over combined summer sessions. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [16.00].

Credits

4

MOA-140 Medical Terminology

This course provides an introduction to the basic structure of medical words, including prefixes, suffixes, roots, combining forms, and the formation of plurals. Emphasis is placed on the correct pronunciation, spelling, and definition of medical terms, allowing the student to build a professional vocabulary for working in the medical field. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

MOA-141 Introduction to Medical Office Assisting

This course is a study of the professional attitudes and behavior required of medical assistants. The fundamentals of meeting the special needs of patients are also studied. The fundamental principles of human relations and the importance of professional growth and communication skills are stressed. Additional emphasis is placed on development of medical science, health agencies, medical specialties, and common disease processes. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

MOA-145 Medical Office Assistant: Overview

This course is offered to candidates for the Certified Medical Assistant Examination administered by the American Association of Medical Assistants. Subjects to be covered in the course are medical terminology, human relations, medical law and ethics, anatomy and physiology, administrative procedures, and clinical procedures. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Corequisites

MOA-244

MOA-200 Pharmacology for Medical Office Assistants

This course introduces the student to drug practices, procedures, and preparations utilized in ambulatory care settings. Topics include legislation, drug sources, classifications, and actions. Emphasis is placed on function of drugs, vitamins and minerals, and substance abuse, as well as the effects of medications on the various body systems. Lecture [2.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

MOA-140

MOA-201 Diagnostic and Procedural Coding

This course enables the student to develop competence in coding systems, diagnoses, and procedures for data collection and processing. The student will follow federal regulations and guidelines for sequencing of diagnoses and processing activities. The laboratory component of the course is utilized to develop the skills and competencies to perform coding through both manual andcomputer-based methods. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

MOA-140

MOA-203 Medical Office Assistant Administrative Procedures I

This course provides a comprehensive medical office simulation in medical administrative competencies. Students will be exposed to both paper and electronic medical records applications. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Corequisites

MOA-140, INF-119

MOA-204 Medical Office Assistant Administrative Procedures II

This course provides advanced training in medical office procedures and management. Students are required to complete a computer-based simulation in medical accounting and billing procedures. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

MOA-203

MOA-218 Medical Economics

This course is a study of various types of medical practice and medical care, fee determination, health and accident insurance programs, and government medical care programs. Medical law and ethics are also emphasized. Lecture [2.00].

Credits

2

Corequisites

MOA-141

MOA-240 Clinical Office Practice

This course enables the student to develop competence in examination room techniques. Special emphasis is placed on preparing the patient for examination, taking vital signs, preparing for sterilization and injection procedures, taking electrocardiograms, performing first aid and emergency procedures including CPR, and caring for supplies and equipment in the physician's office.Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

MAT-040, MOA-140, MOA-141

MOA-241 Clinical Laboratory Technology

This course enables the student to develop competence in the techniques of laboratory procedure commonly performed in a physician's office. Procedures studied include urinalysis, hematology, bacteriology, immunology, and basal metabolism. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

MOA-240

MOA-243 Medical Office Assistant Externship I

This course provides the student with 120 hours of directed experience in a physician's office or other relevant medical facility. Attendance is required at scheduled seminars. Laboratory [8.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

MOA-240

Corequisites

MOA-203, MOA-241

MOA-244 Medical Office Assistant Externship II

This course enables the student to continue with 120 hours of directed experience in an assigned physician's office or other relevant medical facility. Emphasis is on refinement of skills and performance of all administrative and clinical tasks. Attendance is required at scheduled seminars. Laboratory [8.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

MOA-243

MUA-101 Bass I

This course provides instruction in bass designed to develop the student's level of proficiency. The student attends one lesson per week. Lesson times are arranged during the first week of classes. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

MUA-102 Guitar I

This course provides instruction in guitar designed to develop the student's level of proficiency. The student attends one lesson per week. Lesson times are arranged during the first week of classes. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

MUA-103 Percussion I

This course provides instruction in percussion designed to develop the student's level of proficiency. The student attends one lesson per week. Lesson times are arranged during the first week of classes. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

MUA-104 Piano I

This course provides instruction in piano designed to develop the student's level of proficiency. The student attends one lesson per week. Lesson times are arranged during the first week of classes. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

MUA-105 Strings I

This course provides instruction in string instruments designed to develop the student's level of proficiency. The student attends one lesson per week. Half-hour individual lesson times are arranged during the first week of classes. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

MUA-106 Voice I

This course provides instruction in voice designed to develop the student's level of proficiency. The student attends one lesson per week. Lesson times are arranged during the first week of classes. Lecture [1.00].

Credits

1

MUA-107 Woodwinds/Brass I

This course provides instruction in woodwinds and brass designed to develop the student's level of proficiency. The student attends one lesson per week. Lesson times are arranged during the first week of classes. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

MUA-231 Bass II

This course provides instruction in bass designed to develop the student's level of proficiency. The student attends one lesson per week. Lesson times are arranged during the first week of classes. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

MUA-101

MUA-232 Bass III

This course provides instruction in bass designed to develop the student's level of proficiency. The student attends one lesson per week. Lesson times are arranged during the first week of classes. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

MUA-231

MUA-233 Bass IV

This course provides instruction in bass designed to develop the student's level of proficiency. The student attends one lesson per week. Lesson times are arranged during the first week of classes. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

MUA-232

MUA-234 Guitar II

This course provides instruction in guitar designed to develop the student's level of proficiency. The student attends one lesson per week. Lesson times are arranged during the first week of classes. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

MUA-102

MUA-235 Guitar III

This course provides instruction in guitar designed to develop the student's level of proficiency. The student attends one lesson per week. Lesson times are arranged during the first week of classes. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

MUA-234

MUA-236 Guitar IV

This course provides instruction in guitar designed to develop the student's level of proficiency. The student attends one lesson per week. Lesson times are arranged during the first week of classes. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

MUA-235

MUA-237 Percussion II

This course provides instruction in percussion designed to develop the student's level of proficiency. The student attends one lesson per week. Lesson times are arranged during the first week of classes. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

MUA-103

MUA-238 Percussion III

This course provides instruction in percussion designed to develop the student's level of proficiency. The student attends one lesson per week. Lesson times are arranged during the first week of classes. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

MUA-237

MUA-239 Percussion IV

This course provides instruction in percussion designed to develop the student's level of proficiency. The student attends one lesson per week. Lesson times are arranged during the first week of classes. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

MUA-238

MUA-240 Piano II

This course provides instruction in piano designed to develop the student's level of proficiency. The student attends one lesson per week. Lesson times are arranged during the first week of classes. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

MUA-104

MUA-241 Piano III

This course provides instruction in piano designed to develop the student's level of proficiency. The student attends one lesson per week. Lesson times are arranged during the first week of classes. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

MUA-240

MUA-242 Piano IV

This course provides instruction in piano designed to develop the student?s level of proficiency. The student attends one lesson per week. Lesson times are arranged during the first week of classes. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

MUA-241

MUA-243 Strings II

This course provides instruction in string instruments designed to develop the student's level of proficiency. The student attends one lesson per week. Half-hour individual lesson times are arranged during the first week of classes. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

MUA-105

MUA-244 Strings III

This course provides instruction in string instruments designed to develop the student's level of proficiency. The student attends one lesson per week. Half-hour individual lesson times are arranged during the first week of classes. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

MUA-243

MUA-245 Strings IV

This course provides instruction in string instruments designed to develop the student's level of proficiency. The student attends one lesson per week. Half-hour individual lesson times are arranged during the first week of classes. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

MUA-244

MUA-246 Voice II

This course provides instruction in voice designed to develop the student?s level of proficiency. The student attends one lesson per week. Lesson times are arranged during the first week of classes. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

MUA-106

MUA-247 Voice III

This course provides instruction in voice designed to develop the student?s level of proficiency. The student attends one lesson per week. Lesson times are arranged during the first week of classes. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

MUA-246

MUA-248 Voice IV

This course provides instruction in voice designed to develop the student?s level of proficiency. The student attends one lesson per week. Lesson times are arranged during the first week of classes. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

MUA-247

MUA-249 Woodwinds/Brass II

This course provides instruction in woodwinds and brass designed to develop the student's level of proficiency. The student attends one lesson per week. Lesson times are arranged during the first week of classes. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

MUA-107

MUA-250 Woodwinds/Brass III

This course provides instruction in woodwinds and brass designed to develop the student's level of proficiency. The student attends one lesson per week. Lesson times are arranged during the first week of classes. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

MUA-249

MUA-251 Woodwinds/Brass IV

This course provides instruction in woodwinds and brass designed to develop the student's level of proficiency. The student attends one lesson per week. Lesson times are arranged during the first week of classes. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

MUA-250

MUS-101 Introduction to Music

This course is an introduction to the study of music, including a variety of musical styles and genres, spanning from ancient times to the present. Through attentive listening and critical thinking, students will develop the ability to analyze and communicate effectively about the role of music in human societies. >General Education Course Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

MUS-103 Fundamentals of Music

This course is a study of such rudiments of music as notation, the structure of scales, intervals, keys, triads, and simple harmonic progressions. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

MUS-105 History of Jazz in America

This course is a study of the historical development of jazz from its origin as a form of Black American folk music to its acceptance as a major expression of American art. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

MUS-106 World Music

This course is an introductory study of the world's musical cultures. Global musical styles from Africa, Asia, Europe, the Middle East, North America, and South America will be examined from both socio-cultural and musicological perspectives. >General Education Course  [ Lecture 3 credits ]

Credits

MUS-107 History of Western Music before 1750

This course is a study of the historical and stylistic development of music from the Gothic period through the Baroque period. > General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

MUS-108 History of Western Music after 1750

This course is a study of the historical and stylistic development of music from the Classical period to the present. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

MUS-109 History of Musical Theatre

This course is a chronological survey course that explores musical theatre from its early beginnings to the present. In a lecture and discussion format, students will explore examples of musical theatre to illustrate musical elements, musical and theatrical techniques, and structural form. Selected works will be considered from the context of their relationship with historicaland artistic values. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Cross Listed Courses

THR-109

MUS-110 Music, Art, and Drama

This course is designed to promote an understanding and appreciation of the human cultural heritage and concentrates upon major developments in music, art and drama during the Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Contemporary periods. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

MUS-118 Vocal Workshop

This course is an introduction to the basic principles of vocal production. Application of correct vocal techniques is introduced through a series of group and solo singing activities. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

2

MUS-119 Songwriting Workshop

This course provides students with a solid background in the art and craft of songwriting. Students will study the elements of songwriting: lyrics, rhythm, melody, harmony, and song structure. Students will work on their original compositions through a series of group and solo activities. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

2

MUS-120 Pop/Rock Ensemble I

This course requires students to study and to perform in a variety of popular music styles. Special attention will be given to the development of creative skills and reading pop charts. Students are expected to participate in concerts for college ceremonies and functions. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

MUS-121 Chorus I

This course requires students to study and to perform standard and contemporary choral literature for mixed voices and to participate in concerts for college ceremonies and functions. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

MUS-125 Chamber Ensemble I

This course requires students to study and to perform standard and contemporary instrumental literature and to participate in concerts for college ceremonies and functions. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

MUS-131 Class Piano I

This course is an introductory course designed to provide fundamental piano instruction. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

2

MUS-132 Music Theory I

This course is a study of elementary diatonic harmony. It includes the study of major scales, natural, harmonic, and melodic forms of minor scales. Also included is the study of interval and triad construction, the figured bass, cadences, plus bass and soprano harmonization. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

2

MUS-134 Ear Training and Musicianship I

This is a basic course designed to develop a comprehension of musical structure and styles through sight singing and musical dictation. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

2

MUS-137 Guitar in the Classroom

This course is a systematic approach to basic guitar technique and an introduction to contemporary music. Lecture [2.00].

Credits

2

MUS-140 Jazz Ensemble I

This course requires students to study and to perform in a variety of jazz styles. Special attention will be given to the development of improvisational skills and reading jazz charts. Students are expected to participate in concerts for college ceremonies and functions. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

MUS-150 Introduction MIDI Sequencing and Synthesis

This course introduces students to the concepts of composing music and processing sounds using software-based sequencers and synthesizers. Topics covered include MIDI theory; composing with MIDI controllers, sequencing software and virtual instruments; synthesizing and manipulating sounds with synthesizers and audio processing tools; converting MIDI to audio; and mixing multi-track productions. Students will also be exposed to various forms of MIDI-based music as a basis for composing techniques. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

MUS-151 Music Production Technology

This course introduces students to the concepts of recording, mixing, and other audio using computer-based Digital Audio Workstations [DAWs.] Topics covered include digital audio theory, DAW signal flow and system requirements, stereo mixing techniques, and use of software-based audio effects processors such as equalizers, compressors, reverbs, and amp simulators. Students arealso introduced to the concepts of MIDI recording using virtual instruments and receive hands-on practice in digital music production in a state-of-the-art production lab. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

MUS-152 Introduction to Music Business

This is a course designed to provide students with important skills and knowledge that will enhance their abilities for a career in fields combining music and business. Basic concepts of how the music industry works and how music is created and marketed will be presented along with discussions of numerous career options. Topics discussed will provide an overview of the record, radio, video, film, television, and advertising industries and how each uses music. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

MUS-160 Sound for Visual Media

Sound for Visual Media ia a hands-on course exploring the ways dialogue, sound effects and music intertwine with various forms of visual media including film, video, and multimedia content. Topics include diegetic vs. non-diegetic sound, Foley, location sound, automated dialogue replacement, voiceover recording, recording techniques, mixing, and signal processing. Students will study how sound has been used historically in visual media, as well as create their own soundscapes. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00]

Credits

3

Cross Listed Courses

ART-160, COM-160

MUS-163 Careers in Music

This course is an introductory survey of career opportunities in the field of music, including music performance and composition, music publishing, sound recording, concert promotion, arts administration, music retail, music education, and music therapy. Students will prepare a portfolio including promotional materials necessary for embarking on a career in the music field. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

MUS-220 Pop/Rock Ensemble II

This course requires students to study and to perform in a variety of popular music styles. Special attention will be given to the development of creative skills and reading pop charts. Students are expected to participate in concerts for college ceremonies and functions. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

MUS-120

MUS-221 Pop/Rock Ensemble III

This course requires students to study and to perform in a variety of popular music styles. Special attention will be given to the development of creative skills and reading pop charts. Students are expected to participate in concerts for college ceremonies and functions. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

MUS-220

MUS-222 Pop/Rock Ensemble IV

This course requires students to study and to perform in a variety of popular music styles. Special attention will be given to the development of creative skills and reading pop charts. Students are expected to participate in concerts for college ceremonies and functions. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

MUS-221

MUS-231 Class Piano II

This course provides continuing piano instruction for any student who fulfills the Prerequisite[s] for the course. The course includes the study of piano literature from the Baroque period to the present and emphasizes the further development of the student?s piano technique. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

MUS-131

MUS-232 Music Theory II

This course is a study of harmonization and harmonic progressions. The course includes the study of six-four chords, non-harmonic tones, modulation, and the dominant seventh chord. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [2.00.

Credits

2

Prerequisites

MUS-132

MUS-234 Ear Training and Musicianship II

This course is a continuation of Ear Training and Musicianship I focusing on the development of aural comprehension skills through sight-singing and music dictation exercises. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

MUS-134

MUS-241 Class Piano III

This is a course designed to develop skills in sight reading, transposition, harmonization styles, and improvisation techniques. Included is the study of piano literature from the Baroque to the present. The emphasis is on good pianist technique. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

MUS-231

MUS-242 Class Piano IV

This is a course designed to further develop skills in sight-reading, transposition, harmonization styles, and accompaniment techniques. Included is further study of piano literature from the Baroque to the present. There is continued emphasis on good pianistic technique. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

MUS-241

MUS-246 Jazz Ensemble II

This course requires students to study and to perform in a variety of jazz styles. Special attention will be given to the development of improvisational skills and reading jazz charts. Students are expected to participate in concerts for the college ceremonies and functions. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

MUS-140

MUS-247 Jazz Ensemble III

This course requires students to study and to perform in a variety of jazz styles. Special attention will be given to the development of improvisational skills and reading jazz charts. Students are expected to participate in concerts for the college ceremonies and functions. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

MUS-246

MUS-248 Jazz Ensemble IV

This course requires students to study and to perform in a variety of jazz styles. Special attention will be given to the development of improvisational skills and reading jazz charts. Students are expected to participate in concerts for the college ceremonies and functions. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

MUS-247

MUS-250 Electronic Music Composition

This course introduces students to advanced concepts of creating standalone electronic music compositions as well as compositions for visual media. Topics covered include subtractive, additive, granular, FM and RM synthesis, mosque concrete composition, film/video scoring, and programming. Students will also be exposed to various forms of MIDI-based music as a basis for composing techniques and will use state-of-the-art music software and hardware to create compositions. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

MUS-150

MUS-251 Studio Record Techniques

This course introduces students to the concepts of recording live instruments and vocals in a state-of-the-art digital recording studio. Students will learn techniques for recording orchestral instruments as well as instruments used in popular music. Topics covered include studio signal flow, microphone selection and placement, use of outboard and software-based effects processors, overdubbing, creating composite audio tracks, and mixing. Students are expected to spend additional time in the studio and/or music technology lab working on assigned projects. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

MUS-151

MUS-252 Music in the Marketplace

This course provides further study of the music industry for students who wish to seek employment in fields combining music and business. This course will provide an in-depth study focusing upon topics including music publishing, national and international copyright law, live performance, managers and agents, music organizations, recording agreements, music publishing, film andtelevision music production, music merchandising, and other contractual obligations. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

MUS-152

MUS-255 Chorus II

This course requires students to study and to perform standard and contemporary choral literature for mixed voices and to participate in concerts for college ceremonies and functions. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

MUS-121

MUS-256 Chorus III

This course requires students to study and to perform standard and contemporary choral literature for mixed voices and to participate in concerts for college ceremonies and functions. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

MUS-255

MUS-257 Chorus IV

This course requires students to study and to perform standard and contemporary choral literature for mixed voices and to participate in concerts for college ceremonies and functions. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

MUS-255

MUS-258 Chamber Ensemble II

This course requires students to study and to perform standard and contemporary instrumental literature and to participate in concerts for college ceremonies and functions. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

MUS-125

MUS-259 Chamber Ensemble III

This course requires students to study and to perform standard and contemporary instrumental literature and to participate in concerts for college ceremonies and functions. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

MUS-258

MUS-260 Chamber Ensemble IV

This course requires students to study and to perform standard and contemporary instrumental literature and to participate in concerts for college ceremonies and functions. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

MUS-259

MUS-261 Advanced Recording Techniques

This course is a further study of recording technology as applied to music production. Topics covered include techniques of live multi-track recording and overdubbing, including microphone selection and setup, mixing techniques such as creating automated mixes using software- and hardware-based signal processors, as well as basic mastering techniques for CD, DVD and other consumer formats such as web-based audio and video. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

MUS-251

MUS-262 Concert Promotion and Production

This course is a practical introduction to the structure of the live performance industry. Topics covered include artist relations, talent and venue management, advertising and public relations, licensing, live sound reinforcement, stage and lighting systems, as well as performing arts administration. The student will gain practical experience by participating in the promotion and production of college sponsored events. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

MUS-151 or MUS-152

MUS-292 Co-Op Work Experience [Music]

This course is designed to provide the student with hands-on experience in a work environment. It is an opportunity for a student to bridge classroom theory with on-the-job experience under professional guidance in a college approved work environment. Onsite evaluations are done by a faculty member/employer. 120 hours work experience distributed over the semester. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [8.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

MUS-252 or MUS-261

MUS-293 Co-Op Work Experience [Music]

This course is designed to provide the student with hands-on experience in a work environment. It is an opportunity for a student to bridge classroom theory with on-the-job experience under professional guidance in a college approved work environment. Onsite evaluations are done by a faculty member/employer. 180 hours work experience distributed over the semester. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [12.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

MUS-252 or MUS-261

MUS-294 Co-Op Work Experience [Music]

This course is designed to provide the student with hands-on experience in a work environment. It is an opportunity for a student to bridge classroom theory with on-the-job experience under professional guidance in a college approved work environment. Onsite evaluations are done by a faculty member/employer. 240 minimum hours work experience distributed over the semester. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [16.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

MUS-252 or MUS-261

- and

Credits

- and

Credits

BUS- Restricted Elective*

Credits

3

DAN/THR-124

Credits

- Dance Technique Class***

Credits

1-2

- Free Elective*

Credits

- Free Elective†

Credits

3

- Humanities Elective*†

Credits

- Humanities Elective**

Credits

3

MUA-1 Applied Music

Credits

MUA-2 Applied Music

Credits

MUS-1 Performance Ensemble

Credits

MUS-2 Performance Ensemble

Credits

- or

Credits

- or

Credits

- or

Credits

<----- or ----

ART- Studio Art Elective

Credits

ART- Studio Art Elective

Credits

3

ART- Studio Art Electives***

Credits

9

NUR-181 Physical Assessment

This course is a first-level course in the nursing sequence which focuses on taking a nursing history including a psychosocial assessment and performing a basic systematic head-to-toe physical assessment of adults using selected techniques. At the end of this course, students will be able to perform a beginning level physical assessment. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

Corequisites

NUR-182, NUR-183, BIO-109, PSY-101

NUR-182 Pharmacology for Nurses

This course is a first-level course in the nursing sequence which introduces the student to the drug classification system. Students will learn basic actions and side effects of drugs and drug regulations. Mathematical calculations necessary to the practice of nursing are taught, and students must achieve a passing score on a medication calculations test in order to pass this course. Lecture [1.00].

Credits

1

Corequisites

NUR-181, NUR-183, BIO-109, PSY-101

NUR-183 Basic Concepts and Skills of Nursing

This course is a first-level course in the nursing sequence. Concepts developed throughout the program are introduced. Orem's nursing model is presented as the organizing framework of the curriculum. The nursing process is introduced as a problem solving technique. Students will be required to pass performance tests and are expected to practice these skills to perfect techniques. Students will plan and implement nursing care in a variety of health care settings. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [12.00].

Credits

6

Corequisites

NUR-181, NUR-182, BIO-109, PSY-101

NUR-281 Adult Health Nursing A

This course is a second-level course in the nursing sequence which focuses on the health care of individuals and families who have needs related to fluid and electrolytes, oxygenation and circulation. Students will use the nursing process in a variety of health care settings to assist individuals, families and groups achieve optimum health. This course runs for half the semesterconcurrently with NUR-282. Lecture [4.00], Laboratory [12.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

NUR-181, NUR-182, NUR-183, BIO-109, PSY-101

Corequisites

BIO-209, NUR-282, PSY-106

NUR-282 Adult Health Nursing B

This course is a second-level course in the nursing sequence which focuses on the health care of individuals and families who have needs related to nutrition and elimination. Students will use the nursing process in a variety of health care settings to assist individuals and families achieve optimum health. This course runs for half the semester concurrently with NUR-281. Lecture [4.00], Laboratory [12.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

NUR-181, NUR-182, NUR-183, BIO-109, PSY-101

Corequisites

BIO-209, NUR-281, PSY-106

NUR-284 Maternal-Child Health Nursing

This course is a third-level course in the nursing sequence which focuses on family units, reproduction, childbearing, and the health care needs of infants, children and adolescents to meet universal self-care requisites. Students will use the nursing process in a variety of health care settings to assist individual families and groups achieve optimum health. Lecture [6.00], Laboratory [12.00].

Credits

5

Prerequisites

NUR-281, NUR-282

Corequisites

BIO-104, SOC-101, NUR-285

NUR-285 Mental Health Nursing

This course is a third-level course in the nursing sequence which focuses on adaptive and maladaptive psychosocial behaviors. Concentration is on the interpersonal and intrapersonal relationships for infants, children, adolescents and adults. Students will use the nursing process in a variety of health care settings to assist individuals and families achieve optimum health. Lecture [4.00], Laboratory [12.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

NUR-281, NUR-282

Corequisites

BIO-104, SOC-101, NUR-284

NUR-290 Adult Health Nursing C

This course is a fourth-level course in the nursing sequence which focuses on the health care of individuals, families and groups who have self-care deficits related to mobility and neurosensory problems. Students will use the nursing process in a variety of health care settings to assist individuals, families and groups achieve optimum health. Professional Role Management content will be integrated within this course during clinical conference time. Students will examine principles and skills inherent in advanced nursing practice, case management, health care economics and leadership. Critical thinking exercises, patient care scenarios, role play and discussion will be utilized. Lecture [4.00], Laboratory [12.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

NUR-284, NUR-285

Corequisites

NUR-291

NUR-291 Adult Health Nursing D

This course is a fourth-level course in the nursing sequence which focuses on the health care of individuals and families who have self-care deficits related to cellular regulation, sexual practices and endocrine and immune function. Students will use the nursing process in a variety of healthcare settings to assist individuals, families and groups achieve optimum health. Professional Role Management content will be integrated within this course during clinical conference time. Students will examine principles and skills inherent in advanced nursing practice, case management, health care economics and leadership. Critical thinking exercises, patient care scenarios, role play, and discussion will be utilized. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [15.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

NUR-284, NUR-285

Corequisites

NUR-290

PAR-101 Principles of Paramedic Science I

This course provides students with the foundation principles of pre-hospital emergency medical care. Students will explore body systems and the pathophysiology that causes a patient to experience the life-threatening ailments that requires them to call 9-1-1. Lecture 4.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

BIO-209, MAT Elective, PSY-201, SOC-101, [WRT-201 or WRT-202]

Corequisites

PAR-102, PAR-103, PAR-104

PAR-102 Paramedic Patient Care Techniques I

This course provides students with the patient assessment and treatment techniques related to excellent pre-hospital emergency medical care. Students will explore the human body systems and learn the systematic ways to approach life-threatening ailments. Lecture [4.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

BIO-209, MAT Elective, PSY-201, SOC-101, [WRT-201 or WRT-202]

Corequisites

PAR-101, PAR-103, PAR-104

PAR-103 Paramedic Diagnostic Methods I

This course provides the student with the ability to gain paramedic skill competency for critically ill patients. Immersion in medical simulation will allow students to demonstrate the concepts and understanding of the roles and responsibilities of a paramedic. Audio-visual recording will be utilized to promote patient safety. This course prepares students for clinical and fieldinternship rotations. Lecture [4.00], Lab [1.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BIO-209, MAT Elective, PSY-201, SOC-101, [WRT-201 or WRT-202]

Corequisites

PAR-101, PAR-102, PAR-104

PAR-104 Paramedic Clinical Concepts I

This course introduces the student to actual patient experiences in the hospital clinical environment. Students will demonstrate the concepts and understanding of paramedic clinical skills. Rotations include various patient care areas allowing competency in respiratory care, airway management, cardiac care, intravenous access and medication administration. Students are assignedto a preceptor who is responsible to observe and assess performance. Travel to off-site clinical affiliates is required. Lecture [2.00], Clinical [7.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BIO-209, MAT Elective, PSY-201, SOC-101, [WRT-201 or WRT-202]

Corequisites

PAR-101, PAR-102, PAR-103

PAR-200 Paramedic Cardiac and Trauma Care

This course certifies students to the credentialing standards set by the American Heart Association for the Advanced Cardiac Life Support [ACLS] course and by the American College of Surgeons for the Advanced Trauma Life Support [ATLS] course. Students must obtain the minimum requirements outlined by the independent credentialing agency to pass the course. Lecture [1.00], Lab 2.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

PAR-101, PAR-102, PAR-103, PAR-104

PAR-201 Principles of Paramedic Science II

This course provides Principles of Paramedic Science II provides the advanced principles of pre-hospital emergency medical care related to age targeted populations, systemic disease and the pathophysiological effects of these emergencies. Integration of special populations and unique response situations will be addressed. Lecture [4.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

PAR-101, PAR-102, PAR-103, PAR-104, PAR-200

Corequisites

PAR-202, PAR-203, PAR-204

PAR-202 Paramedic Patient Care Techniques II

This course is a continuation and exploration of assessment and treatment techniques related to excellent pre-hospital emergency medical care. Students will explore body systems and learn the systematic ways to approach life-threatening ailments. Lecture [4.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

PAR-101, PAR-102, PAR-103, PAR-104, PAR-200

Corequisites

PAR-201, PAR-203, PAR-204

PAR-203 Paramedic Diagnostic Methods II

This course continues to provide the student with the ability to gain paramedic skill competency for critically ill patients. Immersion in medical simulation will allow practice for demonstrating the concepts and understanding of the roles and responsibilities of a paramedic. Audio-visual recording will be utilized to promote patient safety. This course prepares students for clinical and field internship rotations. Lecture [1.00], Lab [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PAR-101, PAR-102, PAR-103, PAR-104, PAR-200

Corequisites

PAR-201, PAR-202, PAR-204

PAR-204 Paramedic Clinical Concepts II

This course continues to introduce students to actual patient experiences in the hospital clinical environment. Students will demonstrate the concepts and understanding of paramedic clinical skills. Students will be introduced to higher acuity areas such as the Intensive Care Units, Emergency Departments and specialty care areas like Obstetrics, Neonatal and Pediatrics. Studentsare assigned to a preceptor who is responsible to observe and assess performance. Travel to off-site clinical affiliates is required. Clinical 4.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

PAR-101, PAR-102, PAR-103, PAR-104, PAR-200

Corequisites

PAR-201, PAR-202, PAR-203

PAR-205 Paramedic Clinical Concepts III

This course is designed to review materials covered by the National Standard Curriculum for the Paramedic. Emphasis is placed on validation of knowledge and skills through didactic review, skills lab performance, computer simulation and practice testing. Current trends in pre-hospital care will be reviewed. Upon course completion, students will be sufficiently prepared to sit for the paramedic licensure examination. Lecture [2.00], Lab [1.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PAR-200, PAR-201, PAR-202, PAR-203, PAR-204

Corequisites

PAR-206, PAR-207

PAR-206 Paramedic Field Externship I

This course provides the student with the opportunity to connect theory and clinical skills learned through the Paramedic Program with the reality of rendering patient care in the pre-hospital environment. Students will be exposed to suburban, urban and rural patient care environments. Travel is required to off-site clinical affiliates throughout the state. Clinical [336 field hours.] .

Credits

4

Prerequisites

PAR-200, PAR-201, PAR-202, PAR-203, PAR-204

Corequisites

PAR-205, PAR-207

PAR-207 Paramedic Field Externship II

This course continues to provide the student with the opportunity to connect theory and clinical skills learned through the Paramedic Program with the reality of rendering patient care in the pre-hospital environment. Students will be exposed to suburban, urban and rural patient care environments. Travel is required to off-site clinical affiliates throughout the state. Clinical[132 field hours.] .

Credits

2

Prerequisites

PAR-205, PAR-206

Corequisites

PAR-205, PAR-206

PHR-100 Reasoning

This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of critical thinking. Topics covered may include the qualities and attitudes of the critical thinker; the nature and importance of rationality; the weighing of evidence and the rationality of belief; common errors in reasoning [e.g., fallacies]; the evaluation of concepts and definitions; the analysis and evaluation of arguments in ordinary language; argument diagramming; and reasoning about causes and probability. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

PHR-101 Introduction to Philosophy

This course is a study of the basic problems and methods of philosophical inquiry, concentrating on the work of such major thinkers as Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Descartes, Hume, Kant, Hegel, Marx, Kierkegaard, and Sartre. Topics of discussion include the nature and limits of human knowledge, the existence of God, the differences between right and wrong conduct, thenature of the good life, and the meaning and value of human existence. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

PHR-102 Contemporary Moral Issues

This course is an introduction to applied or practical ethics. This involves discussions of specific moral problems, issues, controversies, and questions. Topics may include abortion; euthanasia; the death penalty and other punishments; sexual morality; pornography and censorship; discrimination on the basis of race, gender, or sexual orientation; drugs; environmental ethics; the moral status of animals; and the meaning of virtue and vice. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

PHR-103 Introduction to Logic

This course is an introduction to the principles and methods of correct reasoning. Topics of discussion include the relationship between logic and language; the distinction between formal and informal logic; the detection and avoidance of formal and informal fallacies; the formulation and evaluation of deductive arguments; the differences between traditional and modern [symbolic] logic; and the nature, scope, and limits of inductive reasoning. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

PHR-106 Eastern Philosophy

This course is an introduction to the major philosophical traditions of China and India, concentrating on the work of such major thinkers as Lao Tzu, Confucius, Nagarjuna, Vasubandhu, Shankara, and Ramanuja. Topics of discussion include the nature, problems, and methods of Eastern philosophy; the nature of ultimate reality; the nature of the self; the nature and existence of God; the nature and limits of human knowledge; human nature and the human condition; the meaning and value of life and death; the nature of the good life; and the search for enlightenment. >General Education Course. >Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

PHR-107 Introduction to the Philosophy of Art

This course is a study of the basic problems, issues, and questions with respect to the understanding, interpretation, and evaluation of art and beauty. Readings may include philosophers such as Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Kant, Nietzsche, Beardsley, and representation in the arts; environmental aesthetics; the connections between art and ethics and politics; and the nature of aesthetic value. >General Education Course. Lecture: [3.00].

Credits

3

PHR-110 Introduction to Ethics

This course is a study of the basic theories, methods, and problems of moral philosophy. Topics may include the study of the moral theories of Aristotle, Aquinas, Hobbes, Kant, Mill, and Rawls; the relationship of ethics and morality to religious belief; morality and evolution; the nature and meaning of moral terms; moral absolutism and relativism; egoism and altruism; the nature of moral reasoning; conceptions of the good life; free will and moral responsibility. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

PHR-111 Social and Political Philosophy

This course is a general introduction to the broad themes of political philosophy and social theory. Discussions will include: how human life is and should be organized into societies; the nature of political systems and different forms of government; the relationship between the individual and the state; the nature of justice; the influence of economy on society; how human nature influences social nature; and the meaning of freedom and democracy. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

PHR-120 Introduction to Religion

This course is a study of major themes in religious and theological thought. Topics of discussion include the nature and existence of God; the relationship between God, humanity, and the universe; human nature and the human condition; religious responses to the problems of human existence; and the relationship between religion and society. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

PHR-121 Religions of the World

This course is a comparative study of the history, basic beliefs, and characteristic practices of such major religious systems as Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Some attention is also given to the religions of ancient Middle Eastern and Mediterranean peoples, to ancient and modern tribal religions, and to contemporary sectarian and cultic movements. >General Education Course. >Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

PHR-122 Women and Religion

This course analyzes the relationship of women to the major religious traditions of the world, including Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and others. The course examines such issues as religious statements about the nature of women, religious codes of behavior for women, and the extent and nature of women's religious participation within the various traditions.>Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

PHR-124 The Christian Scriptures

This course is an introductory study of traditional and modern perspectives on the Old and New Testaments, with primary emphasis on the New Testament. >Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

PHR-125 The Hebrew Scriptures

This course is an introductory study of traditional and modern perspectives on the Hebrew Bible. The relationship between the Bible and the Talmud will also be discussed. >Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

PHR-126 The Islamic Scriptures

This course is an introductory study of the origins, content, and meaning of the primary sacred text of Islam, the Koran [Qur'an]. The relationship between the Koran and the Hadith [a record of sayings and actions of Muhammed] will also be discussed. >Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

PHR-127 The Buddhist Scriptures

This course is an introductory study of the origins, content, and meaning of the primary texts of Buddhism. In addition to its origins in India and the development of the Theravada and Mahayana schools, the course will also examine the development of Buddhism in Tibet and East Asia, including Pure Land and Zen Buddhism, and in the contemporary West. >Diversity Course. Lecture[3.00].

Credits

3

PHY-100 Energy and Society

This course provides an overview of the nature of energy, its uses, and its effect on the individual, society and the environment. The course will explores the use of energy in contemporary society and the development of renewable energy technologies. Emphasis is placed on conservation, energy efficiency, renewable energy sources and technologies that can be utilized to create a sustainable energy society. The laboratory part of the course will involves service learning projects. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

MAT-011

Corequisites

MAT-011

PHY-111 Astronomy

This course is a survey of the universe, light, astronomical instruments and the historical development of Astronomy. Topics to be studied are the heavens, which include the Earth as a planet, the Moon, the Solar System, stars, galaxies, quasars, black holes, and scientific theories of the creation of the universe. The possibility of life elsewhere is discussed throughout. Labs supplement the course material and include an evening at our observatory. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

PHY-112 Climatology

This course is a study of the Earth's climate. Climate elements and atmospheric heat transfer processes will be studied and applied to climate classification schemes. The effects of climate on human activities will be considered. Special attention will be given to the greenhouse effect, El Nino, Ice Age theories, climate explanations for the extinction of the dinosaurs, and past and future climates. Laboratory work features simple analytical and statistical analysis of climate data. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

PHY-113 Geology

This course is a study of the solid Earth. Topics include minerals and rocks, weathering and soils, groundwater, glaciers, deserts, earthquakes, and volcanism. Special attention will be given to mining and oil prospecting and their environmental effects, fossils and rocks, plate tectonics, analysis of the structure of the Earth's interior, and geologic time and Earth history. Laboratory work includes mineral and rock analysis, soil and vegetation studies, topographic mapping, and review of the geologic calendar. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

PHY-114 Meteorology

This course studies the physics of weather. All concepts are taught from their appropriate Physics principles. Our atmosphere's composition is studied along with those heat transfer mechanisms that lead to its thermal structure. Weather elements - temperature, humidity, clouds, pressure, winds, and precipitation - and their physical interactions are analyzed. The equations of motion are applied to the dynamics of hurricanes, cyclones, and anticyclones. Labs emphasize the Physics of sun-weather relationships, weather maps, and forecasting. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

PHY-185 Introduction to Physics

This course covers a series of topics selected from the following: Newton's Laws of Motion, mechanical energy, work and power, heat and heat transfer, electricity and magnetism, light, sound, atomic structure, and radioactivity and relativity. Conceptual principles are emphasized without dwelling on the rigorous mathematical aspects of the topics studied. Application of principles to environmental and health problems is included. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

PHY-186 General Physics I

This course is the first half of a two-semester, algebra-based physics sequence, and is a study of mechanics [motion, forces, and the conservation laws], waves, sound, and fluids. It covers kinematics, dynamics, energy, momentum, rotation, and the mechanical properties of matter. The laws of physics are investigated and applied to problem solving. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

MAT-160; minimum grade C

PHY-280 Physics I

This course is the first semester of a three-semester, calculus-based physics sequence, and is a study of mechanics [motion, forces, and the conservation laws]. It covers kinematics, dynamics, statics, energy, momentum, oscillations, gravity, and the properties of solid matter. The laws of physics are investigated and applied to problem solving. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

MAT-180; minimum grade C

Corequisites

MAT-280

PHY-286 General Physics II

This course is the continuation of PHY-186 General Physics I, and is a study of heat, electricity and magnetism, light, and modern physics. It covers thermodynamics, electrostatics, magnetic fields and forces, capacitance and inductance, electrical and electronic circuits, geometrical and physical optics, relativity, and quantum theory. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

PHY-186; minimum grade C

PHY-290 Physics II

This course is the continuation of PHY-280 Physics I, and is primarily a study of electricity and magnetism. It covers electrostatics, electrical circuits, magnetic fields and forces, capacitance and inductance, Maxwell?s equations, and the properties of fluids. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

MAT-280, PHY-280; minimum grade C

Corequisites

MAT-281

PHY-291 Physics III

This course is the continuation of PHY-290 Physics II, and is a study of waves, heat, and modern physics. It covers sound and light, geometrical and physical optics, thermodynamics, relativity, and quantum theory. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

MAT-281, PHY-290; minimum grade C

PHY-294 Engineering Mechanics

This course is a study of the state of rest or motion of bodies under the action of forces. This course builds a foundation of analytic capability for the solution of a great variety of engineering problems. Topics covered include the statics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies. Lecture [4.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

MAT-282, PHY-280; minimum grade C

POL-101 American Government

This course is the study of the American national political system and the uses, options, patterns, and limitations of public power. The course examines the theoretical roots of government, the American adaptation of the Western political tradition, the Constitution, decision making structures, the role of the people in government, political parties, lobbies and civil rights. Current policies and problems are analyzed and discussed. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

POL-102 International Relations

This course is an examination of the basic elements and processes of the modern nation-state system. Political power, nationalism, diplomacy, international law, international organizations, balance-of-power strategies, imperialism, regionalism, polycentrism, and current world issues are analyzed. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

POL-103 Political Ideology

This course focuses on the ideologies that have dominated contemporary world politics. Such theories as Socialism, Communism, Fascism, Islamism and Feminism are studied. Writings of key theorists will be read. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

POL-104 State and Local Government

This course is the study of state, county, and municipal political systems. The course examines the making and enforcement of public policy and the political roles of the people, political parties, political machines, and pressure groups. Intergovernmental relations and evolving patterns of metropolitan government are analyzed with an emphasis on New Jersey and Bergen County.>General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

POL-106 Themes in U.S. History [Modern American Presidency]

This course is an analytical and historical examination of the development of the office and powers of the modern American presidency. Emphasis is placed on studying the roles of the president as described in the Constitution, the relationship of the executive with the other branches of government, presidential views of the office, the presidential election system, and presidential character and personality. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

POL-107 Introduction to Politics

This course is a survey of the basic concepts and methodologies of political science. Topics considered include power, comparative and international politics, the state, government, forms of representation, and methods of social science analysis. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

POL-291 Co-Op Work Experience [Political Science]

This course provides a student with practical, supervised work experience in the area of political science. This program is under professional guidance in a college approved work environment. Job placement assistance is available through the Cooperative Education Office. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [3.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

2 courses from POL

POL-292 Co-Op Work Experience [Political Science]

This course provides a student with practical, supervised work experience in the area of political science. This program is under professional guidance in a college approved work environment. Job placement assistance is available through the Cooperative Education Office. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [8.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

2 course from POL

POL-293 Co-Op Work Experience [Political Science]

This course provides a student with practical, supervised work experience in the area of political science. This program is under professional guidance in a college approved work environment. Job placement assistance is available through the Cooperative Education Office. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [12.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

2 courses from POL

PSY-101 General Psychology

This course is an analysis of human behavior with special reference to thinking, learning, memory, perception, and emotion, individual differences in intelligence, psychotherapy, and personality. The scientific nature and practical relevance of psychological investigations and research findings are discussed. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

PSY-102 Introduction to Abnormal Psychology

This course is an examination of psychological adjustment and of the prevention and treatment of psychological disorders. The course focuses on the framework established by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Topics of discussion include community mental health problems, stress and coping mechanisms, anxiety disorders, sexual variations and dysfunction, and the more severe disorders such as schizophrenia. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

PSY-103 Educational Psychology

This course introduces the student to psychology as applied to the teaching-learning process. Topics of discussion include the varieties of human learning, the physical, social, and cognitive development of the learner, the teacher's use of the environment to influence learning, the teacher's role in education, and education self-direction. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

PSY-104 Psychology of Human Relations

This course is designed to encourage the active participation of each student in a series of activities and lectures that promote increased self-awareness and self-concept. Source materials in the psychology of human relations, communications, group behavior, adjustment, and leadership are studied and discussed. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

PSY-106 Developmental Psychology: Lifespan

This course is a survey course that provides an overview of the psychological development of the individual through the lifespan. The changes during the childhood, adolescent, adult and elderly periods are studies via theories applied to the whole human lifecycle. Theories about psycho-social, moral, and language development as well as the effect of work, gender, intelligence,personality, health, and other factors on human development are examined. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

PSY-110 Psychology of Sexuality

This course emphasizes the changing concepts in human sexuality. Of importance are socialization, deviance, treatment, and psychotherapy in the field of sexuality. Of major interest are the paraphilia, victimization, homosexuality, gender identity, and the psychodynamics involved in sexual expression. >Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

PSY-111 Sport Psychology

This course is an introduction to sport psychological theory, research, and application. Sport Psychology examines how psychological factors affect an individual's physical performance, and how participation in sport and exercise enhances psychological health and personal well-being. The topics covered include personality; motivation; arousal and anxiety; group cohesion and leadership; effective communication; imagery and skills training; and psychological reactions to athletic injuries. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

PSY-123 Cross-Cultural Psychology

This course is an analysis of psychological development in a variety of cultural settings. The course explains the similarities and differences in personality between people with different cultural backgrounds. Topics included in the course are childbearing, abnormal and normal behavior, sex roles, attitudes toward authority, and moral/religious traditions in various cultures.>Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

PSY-127 Stress Management

This course is a study of stressful tension and of its psychological and physiological management. Students practice several techniques of coping with stress including problem solving, relaxation techniques, biofeedback, exercise, and work strategies. Personal stress management approaches are emphasized. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

PSY-201 Child Psychology

This course is designed to help the student understand the significant stages of motor, cognitive, linguistic, emotional, and social development of the child as these are influenced by genetic, cultural, and individual forces from the prenatal period through middle childhood. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PSY-101

PSY-202 Adolescence Psychology

This course is the study of human development from late childhood to adulthood. The course examines the physical, psychological, sexual, and social development of adolescents, the development of identity and self-concept, relationships with parents, and the maturation process. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PSY-101

PSY-207 Psychology of Women

This course is an in-depth examination of the psychology of women. The course analyzes the interplay of biological and cultural factors as they affect gender roles. 226128156Typical226128157 female behaviors are examined and assessed in terms of these factors in an attempt to understand the bases of social similarities as well as differences. >Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PSY-101

PSY-210 Social Psychology

This course is an introduction to social psychological theory, research, and application. It examines how people perceive, influence, and relate to others. It also investigates the diverse cultural contexts that shape social interactions. The topics covered will include social perception, attitude formation and change, persuasion and social influence, cultural norms, interpersonal attraction, prejudice and stereotyping, group interaction, aggression, and helping behavior. >Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PSY-101

PSY-291 Co-Op Work Experience [Psychology]

This course provides the student with the opportunity to gain human relations work experience in social institutions that relate to his/her career goals. The program is under professional guidance in a college approved work environment. Students are supervised by a faculty member, and job placement assistance is available through the Co-Op Office. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [3.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

PSY-101

PSY-292 Co-Op Work Experience [Psychology]

This course provides the student with the opportunity to gain human relations work experience in social institutions that relate to his/her career goals. The program is under professional guidance in a college approved work environment. Students are supervised by a faculty member, and job placement assistance is available through the Co-Op Office. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [8.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

PSY-101

PSY-293 Co-Op Work Experience [Psychology]

This course provides the student with the opportunity to gain human relations work experience in social institutions that relate to his/her career goals. The program is under professional guidance in a college approved work environment. Students are supervised by a faculty member, and job placement assistance is available through the Co-Op Office. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [12.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PSY-101

RAD-180 Introduction to Radiography

In this course, the healthcare system and the radiography profession are studied. Specific topics related to patient care management include communication, medical law, ethical practice, vital signs, basic pharmacology, infection control, transfer techniques, medical equipment and emergencies are addressed. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Corequisites

RAD-181, RAD-182

RAD-181 Radiography I

This course introduces the study of radiography. The theory and application of positioning of the chest, abdomen, and upper limb will be explored. Basic principles of radiation protection and radiographic exposure and medical terminology will be reinforced in class and in the laboratory. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [6.00].

Credits

5

Corequisites

RAD-180, RAD-182, BIO-109

RAD-182 Radiography Clinical I

This course is designed to introduce the student to the physical layout and operation of a department of radiology. This course requires the performance of some routine examinations under the direct supervision of a registered radiographer and a college clinical instructor. The student rotates throughout three affiliated hospitals during this experience. Laboratory [8.00].

Credits

1

Corequisites

RAD-180, RAD-181

RAD-183 Radiographic Pathology

This course is a survey of medical and surgical diseases designed to acquaint the student with changes caused by diseases that have a relation to the scope of medical and imaging diagnostics. Lecture [2.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

BIO-209, RAD-283

Corequisites

RAD-184, RAD-285, RAD-286

RAD-184 Advanced Imaging Equipment and Patient Care

This course focuses on advanced diagnostic imaging systems and equipment, quality management, and patient care practices. Topics of this course include advanced principles of pharmacology, venipuncture, contrast media, and complications. This is an exploration of all imaging equipment and quality management practices. Lecture [2.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

RAD-180, RAD-276

Corequisites

RAD-183, RAD-285, RAD-286

RAD-275 Therapeutic and Imaging Modalities

This course offers students an exploration of advanced imaging techniques and related imaging sub specialties. This course also offers legal and ethical issues as they pertain to radiography. Lecture [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

RAD-184, RAD-285, RAD-286

Corequisites

RAD-288, RAD-289

RAD-276 Principles of Imaging Equipment

This course orients the student radiographer to the fundamental principles, operation, and application of radiation-producing imaging equipment used in diagnostic imaging. Topics in this course include atomic structure, radiation, diagnostic x-ray circuit, tomography, image intensification, mobile and automatic exposure control units. Radiation safety and patient care principlesare reinforced. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

RAD-180, RAD-181, RAD-182

Corequisites

RAD-281, RAD-282

RAD-280 Image Production and Evaluation

This course involves the study of the theoretical and practical aspects of image creation. The photographic, geometric, and imaging systems will be explored. Evaluation of changes caused in the radiographic image with equipment and recording systems, demonstrated, and discussed. Also included in this course are the basic concepts of the origin and effects of ionizing radiation on the patient and radiographic image. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

RAD-181, RAD-182, RAD-276

Corequisites

RAD-283

RAD-281 Radiography II

This course continues the study of radiographic procedures. The theory and application of positioning of the lower limb, spinal column, and an introduction to the contrast studies will be explored. Principles of positioning techniques, exposure, and critique will be explored in the laboratory. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

RAD-180, RAD-181, RAD-182

Corequisites

RAD-276, RAD-282, BIO-209

RAD-282 Radiography Clinical II

This course requires students to spend two clinical days a week in a radiology department where students will perform routine as well as some complex examinations under the direct supervision of a registered radiographer and a college clinical instructor. Procedures performed are evaluated on the basis of a competency-based clinical education system. Laboratory [16.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

RAD-182

RAD-283 Intermediate Radiography Clinical

This course requires students to spend two clinical days a week in a radiology department where students will perform routine as well as some complex examinations under the direct supervision of a registered radiographer and a college clinical instructor. Procedures performed are evaluated on the basis of a competency-based clinical education system. Laboratory [25.60].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

RAD-281, RAD-282

RAD-285 Radiography III

This course continues with the study of radiographic procedures, theory, and application of basic skull, advanced skull, an overview of the management and care of trauma, geriatric and pediatric patients. It also includes a study of contrast agents typically utilized and their respective radiographic examinations. This course includes a component of faculty guided independent study of medical terminology. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

RAD-281, RAD-283

Corequisites

RAD-183, RAD-184, RAD-286

RAD-286 Radiography Clinical III

This course requires the performance of routine, complex, and advanced X-ray procedures under the supervision of a registered radiographer and college clinical instructor in a Radiology Department. Students spend 16 hours a week for 15 weeks meeting the established requirements for competency based clinical education. Laboratory [16.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

RAD-282, RAD-283

RAD-288 Radiography IV

This course incorporates three major areas of study - radiation protection, computed tomography, and sectional anatomy. There will be an introduction to sectional anatomy. The use of computer software programs will also be used in the laboratory. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

RAD-276, RAD-285, RAD-286

Corequisites

RAD-275, RAD-289

RAD-289 Radiography Clinical IV

This course requires the performance of routine, complex, and advanced X-ray procedures under the supervision of a registered radiographer and a college clinical instructor in a radiology department. Students spend 24 hours per week for 15 weeks meeting the established requirements for competency based clinical education. Rotations into specialty areas and elective rotations arealso begun. Laboratory [24.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

RAD-276, RAD-285, RAD-286

Corequisites

RAD-275, RAD-288

RAD-290 Senior Student Seminar

This course involves the performance of routine, complex and advanced radiographic procedures under the supervision of a registered radiographer and college instructor in the radiography department. The students will spend twelve [12] weeks meeting the established requirements for a competency-based clinical education. The specialty elective rotations will continue. Upon completion of all required radiography core and clinical competency based requirements, the students are eligible to apply to the ARRT for the radiography certification examination. Laboratory [32.00].

Credits

3

REA-101 Principles of Real Estate I

This course is an introduction to real estate law. Topics covered include property rights, title concepts, liens, contracts, mortgages, deeds, and other property instruments. Students must complete this course and REA-201 in same or consecutive semesters to qualify for the New Jersey Real Estate Salesperson's Examination which must be taken within one year after completion of REA-201. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

REA-201 Principles of Real Estate II

This course is a structured review of real estate law with emphasis on leases, landlord-tenant relations, appraisals, the law of agency, the License Act and Regulations, and other state and municipal laws and regulations. Students must complete this course and REA-101 in same or consecutive semesters to qualify as a candidate for the New Jersey Real Estate Salesperson's Examination which must be taken within one year after completion of this course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

REA-101

REA-202 Zoning, Planning, and Land Use

This course is a study of Land Use Law in New Jersey as set forth in New Jersey Statutes and Case Law with emphasis on the law, practice and procedures before Municipal Zoning and Planning Boards. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BUS-101, REA-101

REA-203 New Jersey Environmental Regulations

This course is a study of environmental regulations in New Jersey and their impact on development, expansion of existing structures, and infrastructure serving municipal land use. Existing statutes, administrative regulations, and recent news articles will be reviewed. Students will be required to submit a research paper involving an assigned problem. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BUS-101, REA-101

REA-204 Real Estate Leasing

This course is a study of New Jersey commercial and residential leasing, civil rights leasing laws, condominiums and cooperatives. Lecture [2.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

BUS-101, REA-101

REA-205 Real Estate Financing

This course is a study of Real Estate Finance including introduction to appraisal, mortgage calculations, and investment analysis. Lecture [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

BUS-101, REA-101

RSP-110 Respiratory Care Pharmacology

This course introduces the student to the medications utilized in the treatment of patients with acute and chronic cardiopulmonary disorders. Lecture [2.00].

Credits

2

Corequisites

RSP-119, RSP-121

RSP-119 Introduction to Respiratory Care

This course is a study of the respiratory therapist's role as a member of the medical team. Gas laws, physics, physiology, and medical equipment terminology are taught. In addition, it provides the student with an in depth understanding of medical gas administration, humidity and aerosol therapy, safety systems, airway management, and infection control. Students will also learnthe mechanical devices utilized to maintain patient airways and the various utilities in the treatment of respiratory and cardiac arrest. Laboratory exercises provide students with an opportunity to develop skills in the application of all equipment modalities, and to demonstrate their skills in resuscitation and airway management. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Corequisites

RSP-110, RSP-121

RSP-121 Respiratory Care Clinical Externship I

This course introduces the student to the hospital environment. The student studies the relationship of the respiratory therapy department with other medical departments in the hospital. The student learns charting, patient rounds, equipment modalities, medication administration, and bronchial hygiene therapy. Laboratory [16.00].

Credits

1

Corequisites

RSP-110, RSP-119

RSP-210 Cardiopulmonary Diseases and Disorder

This course offers the student an opportunity to study the various disease entities and their effect on the cardiopulmonary system. The pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of pulmonary disease are presented in this course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

RSP-119, RSP-121, RSP-110

Corequisites

RSP-222, RSP-225, RSP-220

RSP-220 Fundamentals of Respiratory Critical Care

This is a course of study of the respiratory therapists' role as a member of the critical care team. Students will be introduced to advance management devices utilized to maintain patent airways. Students will learn interpretation of blood gases and sampling techniques. Introductory preparation to conduct therapeutic procedures needed to achieve adequate artificial ventilation with emphasis on non-invasive support and invasive support is part of this course. Students will learn procedures needed to assist the physician. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

RSP-110, RSP-119, RSP-121

Corequisites

RSP-210, RSP-222, RSP-225

RSP-222 Cardiopulmonary Anatomy and Physiology

This course is a study of physiologic mechanisms of the cardiopulmonary system, including a review of the anatomy of the pulmonary and circulating systems; ventilatory physics/mechanics, gas diffusion, physiology of internal and external respiration, oxygen transport, carbon dioxide transport and elimination, ventilation/perfusion relationships; and the neurological control of ventilation. Lecture [2.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

RSP-110, RSP-119, RSP-121

Corequisites

RSP-210, RSP-220, RSP-225

RSP-225 Respiratory Care Clinical Externship II

This course provides the appropriate setting for the continuation of practicing and refining skills obtained throughout the course of the initial clinical experience. The student is provided the opportunity to administer medication through various types of therapy. They will also perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation, airway care and management, infection control procedures, patient assessments, apply non-invasive ventilation therapy, and evaluate and record pertinent data in the patient's chart. Laboratory [16.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

RSP-110, RSP-119, RSP-121

Corequisites

RSP-210, RSP-220, RSP-222

RSP-226 Respiratory Care Clinical Externship III

This course gives the student an opportunity to develop their clinical skills of airway management, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, aerosol therapy, arterial puncture and interpretation, oxygen therapy, hyperinflation therapy, non-invasive ventilation, and patient evaluation. In addition, the student will begin learning basic mechanical ventilation concepts through assessment andmonitoring. Students may have exposure to the ICU's during this rotation. Laboratory [40.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

RSP-210, RSP-220, RSP-225

RSP-231 Respiratory Care Clinical External IV

This course is designed to provide the student with the opportunity to develop advanced skills in the management of ventilator patients in adult critical care areas. Students will also receive an introduction to the neonatal/pediatric intensive care units. In addition, rotations through specialty areas are provided. Emphasis is placed on patient evaluation and education, decision-making skills, communication, and critical thinking skills. Laboratory [16.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

RSP-226

Corequisites

RSP-240, RSP-250

RSP-235 Respiratory Care Clinical Externship V

This course is designed to enable the student to finalize their training in the critical care areas and specialty sites. In addition, students will also rotate through the neonatal and pediatric units. Emphasis is placed on patient evaluation, management strategies, decision-making skills, and critical thinking skills. Laboratory [16.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

RSP-231, RSP-240, RSP-250

Corequisites

RSP-241, RSP-260

RSP-240 Diagnostic Monitoring and Patient Assessment

This course provides the student with an understanding of logical therapeutic interventions based upon pulmonary and hemodynamic procedures utilized in the collection, analysis, and the interpretation of this data in diagnosis and evaluation of treatment of the patient. Attention is given to fundamental physiological concept because these concepts provide a foundation for discussion of cardiopulmonary pathophysiology and common cardiopulmonary abnormalities that occur in patients. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

RSP-226

Corequisites

RSP-231, RSP-250

RSP-241 Neonatal and Pediatric Respiratory Care

This course is a comprehensive overview of pediatric and neonatal respiratory care. Special considerations of respiratory care practice unique to pediatrics and neonatology are discussed. Topics include pediatric anatomy and physiology, fetal development, clinical assessment, oxygen therapy, airway management, mechanical ventilation, resuscitation, cardiopulmonary pathophysiology and disorders specific to this specialty. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

RSP-231, RSP-240, RSP-250

Corequisites

RSP-235, RSP-260

RSP-250 Respiratory Critical Care

This course provides the student with advance skills necessary to manage the intensive care patient. Students will learn to evaluate, monitor, and use protocols to provide advance management therapies based on pathophysiology of the critically ill patient. The laboratory portion of this course will reflect the practical application of the topics presented in lecture. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

RSP-226

Corequisites

RSP-231, RSP-240

RSP-260 Special Topics Respiratory Care

This course will focus on legal, ethical, and cultural issues in healthcare. It will address management issues, healthcare delivery and principles of reimbursement. Students will utilize cased based scenarios and simulations to enhance patient management and critical thinking skills. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

RSP-231, RSP-240, RSP-250

Corequisites

RSP-235, RSP-241

RTT-110 Introduction to Radiation Therapy and Patient Care Management

This course is an exploration of the foundation of radiation therapy practices and variety of roles for the professional in the delivery of health care. Principles of practice, professional responsibilities, medical law and ethics will be addressed. Lecture [2.00].

Credits

2

Corequisites

RTT-120, RTT-121, RTT-130, RTT-150

RTT-120 Radiation Therapy Practices I

This course introduces the student radiation therapist to treatment equipment and techniques. Topics include patient immobilization, localization, simulation, documentation, patient positioning, treatment delivery parameters, prescriptions, and patient care. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Corequisites

RTT-110, RTT-121, RTT-130, RTT-150

RTT-121 Radiation Therapy Clinical Practicum I

This course serves as a clinical orientation to radiation therapy where students are afforded an opportunity to develop professional clinical skills and knowledge through structured rotations and assignments in radiation therapy. Treatment competencies and related objectives will be used to measure clinical outcomes. Students will be afforded 352 hours for this clinical experience. Clinical [24.00].

Credits

2

Corequisites

RTT-110, RTT-120, RTT-130, RTT-150

RTT-130 Radiation Biology and Safety

This course explores the cellular and systemic effects of radiation exposure. Radiation health, safety, and federal and state requirements will be enforced. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Corequisites

RTT-110, RTT-120, RTT-121, RTT-150

RTT-150 Principles of Diagnostic Radiation Physics

This course is a continuation of the exploration of radiation physics. Emphasis will be on basic principles of physics, atomic structure, electro-magnetic and particulate radiation, x-ray circuits, radiographic tubes and radiation production. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Corequisites

RTT-110, RTT-120, RTT-121, RTT-130

RTT-200 Survey of Diseases

This course orients students to disease and disorders that compromise the human body. Emphasis is on cellular, systemic and manifestations. There will be an emphasis on the management of pathologies as well. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

RTT-120

Corequisites

RTT-210, RTT-220, RTT-221, RTT-230

RTT-210 Dosimetry and Treatment Practices

This course applies the concepts of radiation physics to therapy practice. Treatment units, scatter radiation analysis, isodose curves, patient contouring, dosimetric calculations, compensating filtration and equipment calibration are introduced. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

RTT-110, RTT-150

Corequisites

RTT-200, RTT-220, RTT-221, RTT-230

RTT-220 Radiation Therapy Practices II

This course is an exploration of cancer; its detection, diagnosis, correlation and prognosis. The focus of the course is on the management of neoplastic disease and its mechanism of spreading. Various laboratory experiments will be used to demonstrate the role of radiation therapy in the treatment of cancer. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

RTT-120

Corequisites

RTT-200, RTT-210, RTT-221, RTT-230

RTT-221 Radiation Therapy Clinical Practicum II

This course affords student radiation therapists an avenue to continue their development of professional skills through rotations on various treatment machines, treatment planning, and simulation. Objectives and treatment competencies will be used to assess outcomes. Students will be given 352 hours for this clinical experience. Clinical [24.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

RTT-121

Corequisites

RTT-200, RTT-210, RTT-220, RTT-230

RTT-222 Radiation Therapy Clinical Practicum III

This course affords student radiation therapists with an avenue to continue the development of advanced professional clinical skills through the correlation of didactic theory. Students continue towards competency and mastery and will be given 408 hours of clinical experience. Clinical [34.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

Prerequisite[s]: RTT-210, RTT-220, RTT-221, RTT-230

RTT-230 Advanced Procedures

This course explores advanced practices that the student will incorporate into their basic foundation of knowledge. Cross-sectional anatomy will be presented through didactic presentation. Quality control parameters for therapeutic and simulation equipment will be presented through a synchronous didactic and laboratory presentation. There will be an introduction to computing,information processing, computer concepts and various laboratory experiments. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

RTT-120, RTT-150

Corequisites

RTT-200, RTT-210, RTT-220, RTT-221

SOC-101 Sociology

This course is an examination of the culture and structure of human societies. The course focuses on social groups and institutions, their norms and controls, and how and why they change. Topics of discussion covered include the family, education, deviance, race and ethnicity, gender roles, social change, and social inequalities. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

SOC-102 Introduction to Human Services

This course is an analysis of social service systems in the United States. The course provides an overview of educational, mental health, child care, and recreational social service agencies. Through group participation, lectures, role-playing, and field trips, students learn to recognize the common aspects of helping within the broad field of human services. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

SOC-103 Sociology of the Family

This course is a study of the oldest and most fundamental social institution. This course analyzes various types of courtship, parenting, human sexuality, marital breakup, and family patterns. Family life is viewed from the perspective of society and of the individual. Students are encouraged to examine their own family patterns in relation to the broad range of possibilities that are discussed. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

SOC-104 Intro to Social Work

This course is an analysis of the goals, ethics and values of social worker’s, agency structure, how social workers can advocate for change across client role that advocacy and a strengths-based perspective plays in the role of a social worker. Though lectures and group participation, student’s learn perspectives, definitions, dynamic, current issues, and social work roles while working within a multicultural society.  3 lectures, 3 credits > Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

SOC-113 Social Problems

This course is the study of contemporary social issues and problems in the United States. Various theoretical perspectives are utilized in an effort to understand why particular issues become defined as problems, to determine the origin of social problems, and to critically assess proposed solutions to these perceived problems. Topics of discussion can include: crime and delinquency, poverty, family violence, overpopulation, war, AIDS, sexual assault, mental illness, racism, sexism, and classism [social inequality]. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

SOC-115 Introduction to Substance Abuse

This course presents an introductory systems-oriented approach to addressing alcohol and other drug problems. Providing an overview of chemical dependency and addiction services, the course examines causal theories, models, and definitions. In addition, intervention and prevention strategies, as well as public policy issues will be explored. Special attention will be given to the family systems perspective in theory, research, and treatment. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

SOC-116 Substance Abuse Counseling

This course offers an introduction to the field of substance abuse counseling, and examines the impact of substance abuse on individuals, families and society. Specific techniques for counseling the alcoholic and the problem drinker are presented. Additionally this course will address the etiology of substance abuse, intervention tactics, and primary/relapse prevention strategies will be discussed. Special attention will be given to substance abuse problems in diverse populations. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

SOC-120 Sociology of Gender Roles

This course is a study of the changing roles of men and women in contemporary society. Topics of discussion covered include the biological bases for differentiation in gender roles, male and female roles in a cross-cultural perspective, changing expectations for men and women in work and sports, the sexual revolution, and the consequences of gender role change. >General Education Course >Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

SOC-121 The Changing Roles of Women

This course is an introductory, interdisciplinary study of the changing roles of women today. Topics of discussion include women?s roles in a cross-cultural and historical perspective, the influence of biology, sexuality, and psychology on the roles of women, women in the work force, and women as portrayed in literature, the impact of religious beliefs on women, women?s changingfamily roles, and traditional and present-day feminism. >Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

SOC-222 Ethnic-Minor Group Relations

This course is a study of the diverse ethnic and multicultural structure of the United States. Particular attention is given to Native Americans, Hispanic Americans, Asian Americans, African Americans, Italian Americans, Irish Americans, and Jewish Americans. Topics taught include social, economic, and familial structures of various ethnic groups, the dislocation of new immigrants, prejudice and discrimination, and the life styles of various minority groups. >General Education Course. >Diversity Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

SOC-101

SOC-291 Co-Op Work Experience [Sociology]

This course provides a student with the opportunity to gain human relations work experience in social institutions that relate to his/her career goals. This program is under professional guidance in a college approved work environment. Students are supervised by a faculty member, and job placement assistance is available through the Co-Op Office. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [3.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

SOC-101

SOC-292 Co-Op Work Experience [Sociology]

This course provides a student with the opportunity to gain human relations work experience in social institutions that relate to his/her career goals. This program is under professional guidance in a college approved work environment. Students are supervised by a faculty member, and job placement assistance is available through the Co-Op Office. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [8.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

SOC-101

SOC-293 Co-Op Work Experience [Sociology]

This course provides a student with the opportunity to gain human relations work experience in social institutions that relate to his/her career goals. This program is under professional guidance in a college approved work environment. Students are supervised by a faculty member, and job placement assistance is available through the Co-Op Office. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [12.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

SOC-101

SPE-001 Speaking/Listening I for International Students

This course for international students is designed for beginning students whose native language is not English. The course aims at developing comprehension of the spoken language, greater fluency, and intelligibility in speaking American English. This course should be taken in conjunction with American Language I. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

SPE-002 Speaking/Listening II for International Students

This course is designed for intermediate students whose native language is not English. The course aims at extending and reinforcing students' skills in listening comprehension, pronunciation, and fluency through extensive practice in using spoken American English. This course should be taken in conjunction with American Language II. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

SPE-001

SPE-006 American Language Pronunciation

This is a course designed to help the nonnative speakers of English improve their American pronunciation. Basic drill material on all the individual sounds, the more important combinations of the English sound system, and the study of intonation and stress in ordinary speech patterns will be provided for practice. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

SPE-007 Advanced Pronunciation for English Language Learners

This course is designed to help advanced non-native speakers of English to polish their American pronunciation. The primary goals of pronunciation training are clarity of speech and effective communication. Emphasis of this course is placed on rhythm, phraseology, intonation, thought groups, and linking. Individual challenging vowels and consonant blends are addressed. This course offers ample opportunities to help students internalize and use their new skills through interactive activities. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

SPE-006

SPE-008 Advanced Listening for English Language Learners

This course is a one-credit listening course that aims to develop listening strategies and improve listening comprehension skills in high intermediate and advanced English language learners. In this course students will practice listening to college lectures, understanding main ideas and details, making inferences, and taking effective notes. Students will increase their abilityto understand academic listening passages by studying lecture organization, recognizing language cues, noting numbers and statistics, and learning academic vocabulary. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

SPE-002

SPE-009 American Language Foundations: Speaking and Listening

This course is for international students with little or no exposure to English. It provides them with instruction in basic expression and understanding simple oral language, including following instructions. They will learn to use vocabulary in everyday speaking situations. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

SPE-010 Idioms, Conversation, and American Culture (Home and School)

This course aims to develop cultural awareness and improve conversation skills in high intermediate and advanced English language learners through the understanding of idioms. Students will recognize and produce the high-frequency idioms and expressions needed in a range of conversational and academic situations. Students will increase their ability to understand spoken and written discourse through structured and communicative activities. This one-credit elective provides training for students who want to build their idiomatic vocabulary and cultural fluency for communicative success in a variety of situations. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

SPE-002

Corequisites

SPE-002

SPE-011 Idioms, Conversation and American Culture (Life and Work)

This course aims to develop cultural awareness and improve conversation skills in high intermediate and advanced English language learners through the understanding of idioms. Students will recognize and produce the high-frequency idioms and expressions needed in a range of conversational and academic situations. Students will recognize and produce the high-frequency idioms andexpressions needed in a range of speech acts, focusing on idioms related to thire daily like and work life. Students will increase their ability to understand conversations through structured and communicative activities. This course will help learners to build their idiomatic vocabulary and cultural fluency for increased communicative success. Laboratory [2.00]

Credits

1

SPE-100 Advanced oral Communication for Non-Native Speakers

This course is designed to help advanced English language learers master the oral/aural skills necessary to succeed in college and professional settings. Students will learn to speak confidently and effectively while focusing on academic presentations, group discussions, and extemporaneous oral communication. This course will address pronunciation and intelligibility issues, teach vocabulary for clear presentations, examine cultural differences, and reduce speech anxiety. Students will improve their ability to comprehend college lectures, academic speeches, and conversational discourse. Lecture [3.00]. 0

Credits

3

Prerequisites

SPE-002 Or Accuplacer placement into SPE-10

SUR-101 Surgical Technology I [Fall Only]

This course is a study of the surgical technologist's role as a member of the surgical team. Surgical principles, technique, and procedures are taught. The laboratory segment consists of demonstrations and return demonstrations of performance skills. Lecture [5.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

6

Corequisites

SUR-102, SUR-103, SUR-104

SUR-102 Surgical Technology Externship I [Fall Only]

This course introduces the student to the operating room environment. Approximately six weeks are spent on campus in a preclinical segment, during which time the student is exposed to background information and practice of entry level skills. The remaining time is spent in the clinical area with directed experience in surgical procedures and operating room practice. Laboratory[16.00].

Credits

2

Corequisites

SUR-101, SUR-103, SUR-104

SUR-103 Surgical Terminology [Fall Only]

This course is a study of the basic structure of medical and surgical words, including roots, combining forms, prefixes and suffixes. Emphasis is placed on correct pronunciation and definition of surgical terms, allowing the student to build a professional vocabulary for working in the operating room. Lecture [1.00].

Credits

1

Corequisites

SUR-101, SUR-102, SUR-104

SUR-104 Microbiological Applications in Surgery [Fall Only]

This course is a study of microorganisms and their relationship to disease. This overview of the fundamentals of Microbiology includes historical aspects, cell structure, and the functions of microorganisms. Emphasis is placed on infectious disease, modes of transmission, infection control and their clinical application in surgery. Discussion is centered on the role of the Surgical Technologist regarding operating room techniques, infection control and sterilization, and disinfecting of supplies, instruments and the environment. Lecture [2.00].

Credits

2

Corequisites

SUR-101, SUR-102, SUR-103

SUR-201 Surgical Technology II [Spring Only]

This course is an in-depth study of specialty surgical procedures with emphasis on common diseases and surgical procedures in relation to the various body systems. Lecture [5.00].

Credits

5

Prerequisites

SUR-101, SUR-102

Corequisites

SUR-202

SUR-202 Surgical Technology Externship II [Spring Only]

This course gives the student the opportunity for further directed experience in the operating room. The student will scrub for procedures in general and specialty areas surgery. A study of surgical instrumentation and equipment is also included in this course. Laboratory [24.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

SUR-101, SUR-102

Corequisites

SUR-201

SUR-203 Surgical Technology Externship III [Summer]

This course enables the student to continue with directed experience in the operating room. Emphasis is on refining skills and scrubbing for a wide variety of surgical procedures. Laboratory [24.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

SUR-201, SUR-202

TEC-180 Problem Solving using Technology

This course is a hands-on course using computers and graphic calculators to solve problems related to various industrial and engineering technologies. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

TEC-203 Work Based Learning for Science Technologists I

This course is designed to give students experience in on-the-job laboratory situations to which they can apply the lessons of their interdisciplinary, advanced laboratory-based science technology courses. Students in this course will be counseled by industry and faculty mentors. Laboratory [4.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

TEC-201

TEC-204 Work Based Learning for Science Technologists II

Work Based Learning for Science Technologies II is the second semester of Work Based Learning for Science Technologies designed to give students experience in on-the-job laboratory situations to which they can apply the lessons of their interdisciplinary, advanced laboratory-based science technology courses. Students in this course will be counseled by industry and faculty mentors. Laboratory [6.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

TEC-203

THR-101 Introduction to the Theatre

This course is a study of live theatre and of how it is produced, how it has developed historically and culturally, and how it is analyzed and evaluated. This is primarily a theory course, but it also includes theatre-going assignments. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

THR-109 History of Musical Theatre

This course is a chronological survey course that explores musical theatre from its early beginnings to the present. In a lecture and discussion format, students will explore examples of musical theatre to illustrate musical elements, musical and theatrical techniques, and structural form. Selected works will be considered from the context of their relationship with historicaland artistic values. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Cross Listed Courses

MUS-109

THR-110 Basic Act Techniques

This course utilizes practical exercises to aid the beginning actor in developing technique from which to build self-confidence and believable characterizations. The course stresses the importance of self-discipline in developing creativity and freedom in voice and movement. Assignments include the presentation of scenes from various works during the semester. Lecture [2.00],Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

THR-111 Oral Interpretation of Literature

This course explores the development of performance and vocal techniques in the oral presentation of all types of literature. The use of variety in pitch, volume, tempo, and attitude is stressed in communicating the author's meaning through the reader to the audience. Following specific guidelines, most of the literature is selected directly by each student. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

THR-113 Movement for the Performing Artist

This is a practical course in directing the student to experience, explore, and visualize movements. The aim of the course is to help the actor become a more physically secure and expressive performer. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

2

THR-120 Stage Make-Up

This course provides a practical approach to makeup techniques for theatre and related arts. Through practical experience, students investigate basic, character, and stylized makeup. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

1

THR-124 Dance Experience

This course is a practical and critical introduction to various dance forms. By attending performances, tracing the development of the particular form, studying the demands the art form makes upon its performers, discussing critics' views, and evaluating the experience, students are exposed to broad representation of dance experiences. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Cross Listed Courses

DAN-124

THR-125 Costume Construction I

This course is an introduction to the historical significance of costume design and construction. They will then have an overall look at the technical side of stage costuming, with an emphasis in construction. Students will develop practical skills using the machinery as well as learning patterning for the various parts of a costume. They will learn hand sewing, fabric dyeing techniques as well as the organizational tools such as budgeting costumes for a show. Lecture [2.00].

Credits

2

THR-131 Stagecraft and Lighting

This course introduces the student to the theory and practice of stagecraft. It includes study in scene design, practice in construction of sets, and the setting and control of lighting. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

THR-140 Introduction to Cinema

This course is a study of film as an art form. The course is designed to awaken a more sensitive and critical response to the cinema through an understanding of its form, content, development, and criticism. Films are screened to demonstrate these elements. >General Education Course. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Cross Listed Courses

CIN-140

THR-210 Scene Study

This course includes advanced work in characterization, vocal and body control, and exercise in the development of style and technique relevant to scenes and plays selected for study and presentation. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

THR-110

THR-214 Audition Techniques

This is a practical course which helps the student investigate, select, and prepare audition material appropriate to the individual and the audition call. The course includes exercises in handling cold readings and in learning to look at auditions from the casting director's point of view. Lecture [2.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

THR-110

THR-215 Directing for the Stage

This course is designed to instruct students in the fundamentals of direction for the stage. Student directors will learn how to analyze a script, cast, block, and direct a scene that will be presented in a performance for the public. This course explores various directing techniques that emphasize not only the artistic approach but also the practical and technical elements ofthe theatre. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

THR-101, THR-110

THR-216 Theatre Production Workshop

This is a practical course that produces a selected dramatic work as a result of collective class involvement in casting, set design and construction, lighting, costuming, makeup, promotion, rehearsal, stage management, and performance. The workshop culminates in a public performance of the project. Lecture [4.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

THR-110, THR-131

THR-217 Theatre Performance and Production

This is a practical course in which students are introduced to acting and/or technical production. As a part of the course, students will actually be involved in theatre productions. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

THR-131

THR-231 Stage Electrics

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the fundamental skills requisite to actualizing lighting and sound designs. Emphasis is given to the identification, use, and maintenance of equipment, as well as to basic electronics theory and practice. Special attention is given to basic theories and aesthetics of light and sound as design elements. Lecture [4.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

THR-131

THR-232 Stage Management

This course is an analysis of the techniques and responsibilities of the stage manager in the various forms of the performing arts. Areas of study covered include stage management in the theatre, concerts, and television. Lecture [1.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

THR-131

THR-294 Co-Op Work Experience [Stage Technology]

This is a field work course in preproduction, production, and/or shop work arranged on an individual basis by the student. The student must attend periodic seminars and/or prepare reports or other projects as required by the Theatre Arts faculty. Credit is based on a predetermined number of hours/weeks worked in an approved theatre shop, or other entertainment facility. Job placement assistance is available through the Co-Op Office. 240 minimum hours work experience distributed over the semester. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [16.00].

Credits

4

VET-102 Introduction to Veterinary Technology

This course introduces the student to the profession of veterinary technology through a study of the duties and responsibilities of the graduate veterinary technician and available career opportunities. In addition, other basic issues such as occupational safety and health, membership in professional organizations, certification and licensing, professional standards and behavior, the human-companion animal bond, and introductory animal restraint and handling will be covered. The course is the Prerequisite[s] to all other VET courses. Lecture [1.00].

Credits

1

Corequisites

VET-103

VET-103 Veterinary Medical Terminology

This course introduces the student to prefixes, suffixes, and word roots used in the language of veterinary medicine. Topics presented include veterinary medical vocabulary and the terms that relate to the anatomy, physiology, pathological conditions, and treatment of selected systems in the various species. Upon completion, students should be able to pronounce, spell, and define medical terms as related to body systems and their pathological disorders. Lecture [1.00].

Credits

1

Corequisites

VET-102

VET-104 Research Animal Technology [Spring Only]

This course is an introduction to the handling, husbandry, and nursing care of the common laboratory animals. In addition, classroom study will cover the principles and ethics of animal research, as well as the laws that regulate the use of animals to ensure that they are treated humanely. Laboratory sessions provide hands-on training in restraint, drug administration, sample collection, anesthesia and research techniques. Dissection is required. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

VET-102, VET-103

VET-110 Nutrition and Principles of Feeding [Spring Only]

This course is designed to introduce the fundamentals of nutrition. Materials cover the six classes of nutrients [water, protein, carbohydrates, lipids, minerals, and vitamins]; their general functions, deficiencies, and toxicities; general digestion, absorption, utilization, and excretion of these classes in domestic animals. We will cover the feeding of animals in health and disease during various stages of the life cycle. Of primary concern will be the dietary management of specific diseases that affect domestic animals. Lecture [2.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

VET-102, VET-103

VET-112 Veterinary Pharmacology [Spring Only]

This course is a study of pharmacology and its practical applications. This course is designed to give the student a basic understanding of drugs and other substances used in the treatment of disease. Emphasis is on classification of drugs based on their effects and therapeutic usage, sources of drugs, standards and regulations, weights and measures, conversions, labeling, and pharmacy maintenance. In addition, the student studies possible toxicological effects of these drugs and other toxic plants and substances. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

VET-102, VET-103

VET-115 Vertebrate Anatomy and Physiology I

This course focuses on the structures and functions of vertebrate organ systems, with primary emphasis on mammals. After a brief overview of vertebrate development and evolutionary history, the major portion of the course reviews each system, across all principal groups. Study of basic cellular biology and of skeletal, muscle, and nervous systems are included. Normal homeostatic mechanisms and pathophysiological conditions are emphasized, as well as the interrelationships of organs and organ systems. Dissection is required. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

VET-203 Veterinary Nursing I [Fall Only]

This course will furnish the skills and considerations necessary for the nursing duties of the veterinary technician. Topics include general animal care, handling and restraint, administration of medications and bandaging techniques. Special emphasis will be placed on safety of both patient and handler. Includes laboratory demonstrations and practice on live animals. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [6.00].

Credits

3

VET-204 Veterinary Dental Techniques

This course encompasses various procedures in veterinary dentistry along with the skills necessary to assist the veterinarian in a complete dental prophylaxis and other complicated dental procedures. Oral and dental anatomy will be reviewed. The course will focus on the operation and maintenance of dental equipment, including dental radiography; the performance of a small animaldental prophylaxis procedure; and a survey of dental diseases in small and large animals and exotics. Emphasis will be placed on the scope of services that may be provided by the veterinary technician, including client education. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

VET-112, VET-215

Corequisites

VET-207

VET-205 Clinical Laboratory Procedures I [Fall Only]

This course deals with the examination of blood, urine, and other body substances for diagnostic and prognostic purposes in veterinary practice. Students will learn to perform complete blood counts, blood chemistries, serological tests, and urinalysis. Lecture periods will cover the theories on which the tests are based and the relevance of laboratory results in the evaluationof the health of animals. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

VET-102, VET-103, VET-112, VET-115, VET-215

VET-207 Diagnostic Imaging [Fall Only]

This course is an introduction to basic radiology, ultrasound and associated diagnostic techniques. The student will learn how to correctly position a patient, calculate exposure values, expose radiographic film, and process radiographs of diagnostic quality, both manually and automatically, for the veterinarian to examine. Special emphasis is placed on the potential hazards of radiation and occupational safety. Laboratory experiences provide skills practice in radiographic technique. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

VET-102, VET-103, VET-115, VET-215

VET-214 Veterinary Nursing II [Spring Only]

This course is a continuation of Veterinary Nursing I. Principles of emergency care, intensive care, administration of drugs and fluids, shock therapy, oxygen therapy and the application of indwelling catheters will be discussed. This course will include a general study of diseases, their definition, etiology, pathogenesis, clinical signs, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. Intensive care nursing will include hands on experience with animals and models. Lecture [1.00], Laboratory [6.00]. 3

Credits

3

Prerequisites

VET-203

VET-215 Vertebrate Anatomy and Physiology II

This course is a continuation of Vertebrate Anatomy and Physiology I. The endocrine, circulatory, respiratory, renal, reproductive and digestive systems will be studied. Normal homeostatic mechanisms and pathophysiological conditions are emphasized, as well as the interrelationships of organs and organ systems. Dissection is required as part of the laboratory syllabus. Lecture[3.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

4

Prerequisites

VET-115

VET-216 Veterinary Office Management [Fall Only]

This course is designed to introduce the student to modern veterinary hospital business practices. Study of inventory procedures, accounting and computer skills, medical records, personnel management, and psychology of client and staff relations will be addressed. The course emphasizes professional ethics, interpersonal and client communication. Lecture [2.00].

Credits

2

Prerequisites

VET-102, VET-103

VET-217 Clinical Laboratory Procedures II [Spring Only]

This course will cover basic parasitology, cytology, histology and necropsy techniques. The student will study the life cycles, pathogenesis, identification, prevention, control and public health concerns of internal and external parasites in domestic animals. Cytological specimens will be collected and processed. A necropsy prosection will be performed, with the collection of specimens and preparation of histology slides for examination by the veterinarian. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

VET-205

VET-218 Large Animal Nursing [Summer Only]

This course is designed to teach the student the skills associated with assisting the large animal practitioner. The essential tasks relating to handling, restraint, treatment, venipuncture, treatment, anesthesia, and administration of drugs and fluids to far animals will be covered. A study of diseases of these animals with emphasis on disease control, prevention, treatment andimmunization will be discussed. Common surgical procedures, as well as specimen collection and preservation will be reviewed. Lecture [2.50], Laboratory [3.75].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

VET-110, VET-112

VET-219 Surgical Assist and Anesthesia [Spring Only]

This course includes in-depth discussion and hands-on experience with hygiene of the surgical suite and surgical prep room, asepsis, surgical instruments, and sterilization. The student will learn the basics of animal anesthesia as used in surgical procedures. It includes drugs and equipment for anesthetic administration, recovery, and emergencies, along with management of thesepreparations. We will also provide the student with in-depth coverage of preoperative and postoperative patient care. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

VET-203

VET-220 Veterinary Technology Externship I

This course is a clinical experience providing the student with the opportunity to refine technical skills developed in areas such as animal handling, nursing care and treatment, surgical assistance, radiology, anesthesia, dental prophylaxis, diagnostic laboratory procedures, practice management, and client communication. Students spend 12 weeks in total in a pre-approved smallanimal hospital, animal research facility, or other allied animal health facility within the metropolitan area. Students train under the supervision of licensed veterinarians and graduate veterinary technicians. Laboratory [16.00].

Credits

1

VET-221 Veterinary Technology Externship II

This course is a clinical experience providing the student with the opportunity to refine technical skills developed in Externship I. Students spend 12 weeks in total in a pre-approved small animal hospital, animal research facility, or other allied animal health facility within the metropolitan area. Students train under the supervision of licensed veterinarians and graduate veterinary technicians. Veterinary Technology Externship II is the second half of the student's clinical experience Laboratory [16.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

VET-220

WEX-101 Dynamics of Health and Fitness

This course is a theory based study of exercise and its effects on humans. Topics investigated are lifestyle issues in wellness including cardiovascular function, weight management and nutrition, strength, flexibility, stress management and principles/programs of exercising. Lecture [2.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

2

WEX-104 Aquacise

This course is an opportunity for the student to increase fitness through selected aquatic activities such as in-the-water stretching, running, and calisthenics movements. A comfortable exercise program will be adapted to each person's tolerance level. No swimming ability is required. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

WEX-105 Fitness Center Plus

This course is a physical activity which provides students with the opportunity to participate in personal conditioning programs. Fitness evaluations and computer prescribed exercise programs are generated for each student. All equipment in the Fitness Center is employed to develop and maintain these individualized fitness programs. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

WEX-106 Nutrition, Exercise, and Fitness

This course explores concepts of nutrition as they apply to exercise and performance. Topics include bioenergetics, thermodynamics and the energy equation, ergogenic aids, supplements and computerized diet analysis. Required for Exercise Science Certificate and Degree. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

WEX-111 Aerobic Conditioning

This course is an application of the theories explored in WEX-101. The course is designed to provide students with opportunities to improve cardiovascular health, muscle endurance, flexibility and stress reduction. Different modes of aerobic training will be used which may include movement to music. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

WEX-112 Body Conditioning

This course is an application of the theories explored in WEX-101. The course is designed to effect changes in such fitness areas as cardiorespiratory endurance, flexibility, strength, and body composition thorough aerobic conditioning, progressive resistance exercises, and flexibility exercises. The development of personal exercise regimens for lifelong participation is emphasized. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

WEX-114 Keep Young, Fit, and Alive

This course is an application of the theories explored in WEX-101. The course is designed to emphasize the management of musculoskeletal concerns such as low back and stress reduction. It may include aerobic, flexibility and various resistance modalities. Dietary practices may also be addressed. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

WEX-115 Swimming for Conditioning

This course is an application of the theories explored in WEX-101. The course is designed to effect changes in cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength, and flexibility. Students must have good swimming ability. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

WEX-116 Weight Training

This course is an application of the theories explored in WEX-101. The course is designed to effect changes in muscular strength and endurance through a variety of appropriate training techniques and applications. The development of personal exercise regimens for lifelong participation is emphasized. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

WEX-117 Core Stability Training

This course is designed to strengthen the core musculature of the body. Students will strengthen abdominal and low back core musculature, improve posture and balance, enhance flexibility, and decrease occurrence of injury and low back pain. This course will also implement resistance training with the use of free weights and the stability balls to improve upper and lower body strength. The use of specific core and balance equipment will be a focus of this experience. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

WEX-118 50+ Fitness

This course is an application of the theories explored in WEX-101. The course is designed to provide students [50 years or older] with opportunities to increase fitness through individualized programs emphasizing flexibility, aerobic conditioning, muscle strength/endurance and weight management. Laboratory [2.00]. 1

Credits

1

Prerequisites

WEX-101

WEX-123 Sports Ethics

This is an introduction to ethics within the sporting context. The values promoted within sport will be examined along with common ethical dilemmas faced by those involved in sport. The course covers topics ranging from fair play to sportsmanship to current ethical issues. Lecture [3.00]

Credits

3

WEX-124 Issues and Trends in Sport

This course is designed to address the issues and trends happening in sports today. it includes historical analysis, instructional perspective, and political influences regarding trends and issues. Current events in the media will be used as case studies to identify their impact in both the sporting world as well as on society. Lecture [3.00]

Credits

3

WEX-125 Recreational Sport and Fitness Administration

This course is the study of the organization and direction of recreational activities and their management. it is a study of nature and function of fitness and recreation and the general principles of organization in the recreation field and fitness clubs Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

WEX-126 Sports Administration

This course provides an overview of the general principles of management, applies them to the sports industry, and sports organizations in particular. The course includes basic organizational business structures, trends, and observations. Students will also consider the ethical and moral dilemmas facing sports managers as well as the role of sports in society, and explore careeropportunities. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

WEX-127 Sports Facilities & Events Management

This course provides the student with an overview and examination of the facility master planning process, including legal requirements and economic considerations. This course includes planning, supervising, maintaining and evaluating sports facilities and events. Financial considerations for both the private and public sector will be emphasized. Everyday supervision of maintenance, inventory, potential vandalism, and comprehensive event planning management is included. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

WEX-128 Sports Fundamentals

This course is a practical study of the fundamental principles and techniques of major sports. Students experience and practice various common sports activities. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

WEX-130 Massage for Sport and Leisure Activities

This course is the theory and practice of manual manipulation and its role in exercise. Topics will include basic anatomy, physiologic concepts relative to massage and the healing process, as well as assessment of selected musculoskeletal issues. Included in the course will be the opportunity to investigate and practice a variety of techniques that can be applied to these situations. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

3

WEX-131 Scuba Diving

This is a course that allows students to develop basic skills in skin and scuba diving by means of lectures, demonstrations, and class practice. Students must have good swimming ability. [International certification is optional.] Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

WEX-133 Mindfulness & Good Health

Mindfulness & Good Health is an introduction to the theory and practice of mindfulness: mind-body exercises that develop awareness of present-moment thoughts, feelings, and actions. Students will learn how to incorporate mindfulness practices into their lives to reduce stress, improve emotional balance and resilience, and enhance their personal and academic lives. (2 labs; 1 credit)

Credits

1

WEX-159 Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation [CPR] and Emergency First Aid

This course provides the student with the knowledge and practical skills needed to respond to various emergency situations including: burns; wounds; respiratory and cardiac problems; broken bones; poisoning; etc. Students will receive certification in CPR and First Aid upon successful completion of the course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

WEX-160 Kinesiology for Personal Training and Exercise

This course is the study of movement and the neuromuscular skeletal structures and their function in relation to activity. The purpose is to analyze human movement through applied anatomy for injury protection during exercise and sport. The role of muscles during movement and types of muscle contractions will be explored. Emphasis of kinesiology will be explored through relatedresearch. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

WEX-163 Nutrition Today

This course is an investigation of basic nutrition concepts. Current studies and findings are explored and evaluated. Information is used to formulate practices that maximize health benefits. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

WEX-164 Exercise Science

This course is a theory based investigation of the effects of exercise on human health, fitness, and sport performance. Emphasis is on basic principles of exercise physiology, exercise prescription, bioenergetics, body composition, training programs, and practical applications to the exercise setting. Requirementfor Exercise Science Certificate and Degree. Lecture [3.00], Laboratory [1.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Recommended as a Prerequisite to: WEX-106, WEX-183 and WEX-184

WEX-167 Self-Defense

This is a course that provides the opportunity to learn basic techniques in judo, karate, and jujitsu. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

WEX-169 Yoga Dance

This course integrates the principles of yoga with the fundamentals of dance. The course offers a stimulating workout that combines stretch and strengthening with the enjoyment of dancing. Students will develop awareness, experience the flow of energy, improve alignment and core strength, and enhance creative expression. The course is open to students of all levels and aims to promote health and balance by improving the body as an instrument of communication. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

WEX-170 Yoga

This is an introductory level course to the practice of yoga with emphasis on flow and energy. The fundamentals of yoga practice, including mediation and breathing techniques, basic yoga postures [Asana] and basic flow sequences [Vinyasas] will be the focus. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

WEX-171 Golf

This course is a study of the fundamental theories, skills, etiquette and rules needed to play the game of golf. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

WEX-172 Intermediate Golf

This course is designed to further acquaint the student with the game of golf beyond the beginner level, reviewing fundamental skills and developing shot-making strategies. Some previous golf experience recommended either having played the game or taking golf lessons. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

WEX-173 Beginner Tennis

This is a course that provides the student with the opportunity to develop the fundamental skills of the game. It also acquaints students with the basic rules, regulations and strategy of both singles and doubles play. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

WEX-174 Volleyball

This is a course that provides fundamental skills, strategies, and knowledge of power volleyball through teaching-learning experiences and active participation. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

WEX-175 Beginner Level Swimming

This is a basic course for non-swimmers that includes fundamental water safety and survival, crawl stroke, back crawl, breaststroke, sidestroke, and recreational aquatic activities. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

WEX-176 Advanced Swim Training

This course provides an introduction to competitive swimming while increasing cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength and athletic confidence. Advanced Swim Training is designed to prepare students for open-water, long and short course competitive swimming. Emphasis will be placed on skill development and improved swimming performance. Laboratory [2.00].

Credits

1

WEX-182 Fitness Measurement and Interpretation

This is a course involving analysis of the parameters of fitness, sport performance, and their assessment. Topics include measurement protocols and the quantitative expression of body composition, aerobic capacity and energy expenditure, strength, endurance, flexibility and sport specific elements relative to exercise application. Requirement for Exercise Science Certificate andDegree. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

WEX-183 Principles of Conditioning

This course is an application of theories explored in Exercise Science [WEX-164]. This course is designed to provide the student with opportunities to apply conditioning concepts, teaching methodology and presentation experience in a one-on-one and Co-Op teaching setting. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

WEX-184 Sports Medicine - Theory and Practice

This course develops an awareness of sports medicine and provides the student with concepts, knowledge, and practical skills in the areas of prevention, evaluation, management, and rehabilitation of exercise-induced trauma. Athletic taping for support of joints and muscles is taught and practiced. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

WEX-281 Co-Op Work Experience [Exercise Science]

This course enables the student to gain essential hands-on experience in a fitness center under professional guidance and supervision. 60 minimum hours work experience distributed over the semester. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [3.00].

Credits

1

Prerequisites

WEX-164, WEX-183

WEX-283 Co-Op Work Experience [Sports Management]

This course provides students with practical experience in professional, collegiate, amateur, or business institutions in sports-related industries. Students can pursue their individual interests and goals through the Co-Op program in Sports Management. 180 minimum hours work experience distributed over the semester. Lecture [1.00], Cooperative [12.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WEX-127

WRT-101 English Composition I

This course provides students with extensive practice in critical reading and thinking, and academic essay writing. The course emphasizes the writing process, and concentrates on the organization and development of ideas. Students will develop their reading and writing skills, and learn how to integrate primary and secondary sources into their writing for the purpose of supporting a thesis. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

EBS-101; EBS-012, EBS-021 or ALP-063 or by placement exam

WRT-201 English Composition II

This course continues the emphasis of English Composition I on the writing process, and on critical reading and thinking skills. Particular attention is devoted to writing with sources and to argumentative writing. Emphasis is placed on correct language usage and on research and the techniques of MLA documentation. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

WRT-202 Technical Writing

This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of expository writing in the business, scientific, and industrial fields. Special attention is given to the writing of progress reports, sales and statistical reports, and other types of office, clinical, and scientific material. >General Education Course. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

WRT-204 Creative Writing

This is a course in which students write in such forms as poetry, fiction, and drama. Students read and discuss each other's work as well as that of published authors. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

WRT-205 Creative Writing Workshop - Fiction

This course gives students the opportunity to focus on the elements of fiction writing. Students read and discuss each other's work. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

WRT-206 Memoir/Creative Non-Fiction

This is a course in which students write memoir and creative non-fiction using such forms as essay, narrative, and poetry. Students read and discuss each other's work as well as that of published authors; they utilize blogs to store and share their writings. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

WRT-207 Creative Writing - Poetry

This is a course in which students write poetry using both lyric and narrative styles. The course will focus on a study of contemporary poetry, but students will also gain an understanding of traditional poetic forms such as the sonnet, villanelle, sestina, ode, and elegy. In addition to producing a portfolio of original poems, students will read and discuss each other's work aswell as that of published authors. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

WRT-208 Creative Writing - Playwriting

This course allows students to experience and practice the creative process involved in writing. It provides students with an understanding of dramatic text, the skills necessary to create character, relationship, dialogue, and dramatic action. In addition, the course introduces students to the process of stage performance and managing their scripts for this medium. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101

WRT-216 Writing for Professional Purposes

This course gives students a background in the fundamentals of professional, edited English. It is designed to build upon basic competency in writing and provide a basis for students seeking careers in fields in which a command of the technical and stylistic terminology of writing is essential. Lecture [3.00].

Credits

3

Prerequisites

WRT-101